2005 Judge Article of the Year

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The clear winner was:

Judging Side Events: The myth

10/11/2005 - George Michelogiannakis, Level 3

It’s a common misperception that side events are "lowly" and that side event judges are not as important as main event judges. A few judges and players see side events as a place where inexperienced judges work with inexperienced players, while the "cool" judges get to judge under camera flashlights in the main event. You might, however, be surprised by the fact that side events are as important as the main event, and often have more to offer to judges working in them.


The majority portion of the other votes were a close tie between:

Principles of Leadership

03/30/2005 - Paul Morris, Level 2(now 3)

Leadership is often overlooked among judges. Head judges who only handle appeals, while letting the tournament organizer and floor judges run the rest of the event, are missing many opportunities to positively influence the tournament through good leadership. In the words of Sun Tsu: "Leadership is a matter of intelligence, trustworthiness, humaneness, courage, and sternness." -- Sun Tsu, The Art of War. (As translated by Thomas Cleary)

Reviews that Work

11/16/2005 - Mike King, Level 3

The review process is a necessary and (dare I say) interesting part of our job as judges. This simple process gives us an opportunity to assist our colleagues in improving themselves and, by extension, the DCI judge program as a whole...

For many judges, the review process is an uncomfortable part of working premiere events. You never know what to include as feedback, you don’t feel comfortable critiquing a higher-level judge, you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings, you don’t want to interfere with someone’s advancement, etc.

Don’t look at the review as a confrontational process. It is intended as a learning process for both the reviewer and the person being reviewed. Look at it as an opportunity to strengthen yourself, your colleagues, and the DCI program as a whole.

Making Rulings Better

10/20/2005 - Toby Elliott, Level 3 (now 4)

"Instilling player confidence in your rulings is an important part of being a judge. When dealing with players you are familiar with, you have the advantage of history. For players who do not know you as well, making the right impression can be a big help. All Judges spend a lot of time working towards making the very best rulings they can, but many neglect how they are presenting themselves. This article is not intended to help you make better rulings. It is intended to make your rulings better."

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