gpbei13

Zhou Brings Back Beijing!

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Congratulations to Zhou Quan, your Grand Prix Beijing 2013 Champion. Steamrolling through the entire field of 894 with only one match loss all weekend, Zhou was able to retain the trophy on local soil by defeating Thailand's Kositaporn Nonthakorn in the finals.

Three other Chinese players also made the cut, but all fell in the quarterfinals, including World Team Champ and Grand Prix Shanghai Champ Li Bo, Nandi Zhang, and Shuo Li. Rounding off the Top 8 are Toshiya Kanegawa of Japan, Wong Wei Quan from Singapore, and Daniel Godfrey from Wales.

The ten guilds' history is a web of wars, intrigue, and political machinations as they have vied for control of Ravnica, and players will need to deftly maneuver past the challenges and perils of this brand new Sealed format. Will the ten guilds of Ravnica destroy each other or is there a chance of restoring the peace? Only time will tell!




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Bo Li   Toshiya Kanegawa, 2-1        
8 Toshiya Kanegawa   Quan Zhou, 2-1
       
4 Quan Zhou   Quan Zhou, 2-0   Quan Zhou, 2-0
5 Nandi Zhang    
       
2 Daniel Godfrey   Wei Quan Wong, 2-1
7 Wei Quan Wong   Nonthakorn Kositaporn, 2-1
       
3 Shuo Li   Nonthakorn Kositaporn, 2-0
6 Nonthakorn Kositaporn    







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EVENT COVERAGE INFORMATION
 1.  Quan Zhou $3,500
 2.  Nonthakorn Kositaporn $2,300
 3.  Toshiya Kanegawa $1,500
 4.  Wei Quan Wong $1,500
 5.  Daniel Godfrey $1,000
 6.  Shuo Li $1,000
 7.  Nandi Zhang $1,000
 8.  Bo Li $1,000
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  • Top 8 – Players

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen


  • Nonthakorn Kositaporn

    Age: 26
    Hometown: Bangkok, Thailand
    Occupation: Engineer


    Byes:
    3

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    9-0 (White Black Green)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    2-1 (Naya)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    1-02 (Naya)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    This one is the first.

    Other MTG Achievements:
    World Magic Cup Team 2012

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    Pick the bombs!

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    Yes, someone in the Thai MTG community posted the news on our local forums.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Tajic, Blade of the Legion. Because he helped me to get this Grand Prix Top 8!




    Quan Zhou

    Age: 33
    Hometown: Shanghai, China
    Occupation: Logistics


    Byes:
    3

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    8-0-1 (White Blue Red Black)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    2-1 (Blue Black Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    2-0-1 (White Blue Black)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    NIL

    Other MTG Achievements:
    NIL

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    Slightly slower and much more colorful and very interesting!

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Lavinia of the Tenth. I'm always a supporter of the Azorius Senate.




    Daniel Godfrey J

    Age: 27
    Hometown: Cardiff, Wales
    Occupation: Teacher + Student


    Byes:
    0

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    8-1 (Black Red Green)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    3-0 (White Black Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    1-0-2id (Blue Red Green)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    0

    Other MTG Achievements:
    PT Yokohama Day 2

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    Just because the set is multi-colored doesn't mean every deck should be evenly three colors.

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Melek, Izzet Paragon. I generally prefer Izzet!




    Yoshiya Kanegawa

    Age: 32
    Hometown: Yamanashi, Japan
    Occupation: Card Shop Owner (HAMAYA)


    Byes:
    3

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    9-0 (White Black Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    2-1 (Esper)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    1-1-1 (White Green splash Black)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    GP Shanghai Top 8, GP Singapore Top 8

    Other MTG Achievements:
    NIL

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    2/2s are bad. 2/4s are good!

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Tajic, Blade of the Legion, because I'm wearing a Boros shirt!




    Wong Wei Quan

    Age: 24
    Hometown: Singapore
    Occupation: Card Trader


    Byes:
    3

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    8-1 (Naya)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    2-1 (Bant)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    2-0-1 (Esper)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    0

    Other MTG Achievements:
    GP Top 64

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    It's kind of tough, plus there is lots of splashing for bombs and removals.

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Varolz, the Scar-Striped. He's too good in a Jund/Golgari aggro deck!




    Shuo Li

    Age: 25
    Hometown: Daqing City, China
    Occupation: Student


    Byes:
    2

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    7-2 (White Blue Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    3-0 (Esper)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    2-1 (White Blue Black Green)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    First one!

    Other MTG Achievements:
    None

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    Stable mana base is very important, since we usually play many colors.

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    Yes, I do.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Vorel of the Hull Clade. Because I'm from the Simic!




    Zhang Nandi

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Beijing, China
    Occupation: Officer


    Byes:
    0

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    7-1-1 (White Black Green)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    2-1 (White Black Green)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    3-0 (White Black Green)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    NIL

    Other MTG Achievements:
    2012 China Open Top 8

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    The tempo of Junk suits this draft format very well.

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Tajic, Blade of the Legion. Because he is patient and brave.




    Li Bo

    Age: 26
    Hometown: Beijing, China
    Occupation: Freelancer


    Byes:
    2

    Score & Colors for Sealed:
    7-2 (Black Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #1:
    3-0 (White Black Red)

    Score & Colors for Draft #2:
    2-0-1 (Naya)

    Pro Tour & Grand Prix Top 8s:
    Worlds Team Champion 2009, Grand Prix Shanghai 2012 Champion

    Other MTG Achievements:
    China Nationals 2009 Top 4

    Any opinions on the current DGM Draft Format?
    Pick the better card, not choose cards because of the colors.

    Do you know about the secret message printed on the Guildgates?
    No.

    Who is your favorite Maze Runner and why?
    Tajic, Blade of the Legion, because he can't die.

    Editor's Note: Tajic can die to Fatal Fumes, you know? =)






     

  • Top 8 – Decklists

    by Jim Jen











  •  

  • Quarterfinals – Toshiya Kanegawa vs. Li Bo

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen

  • Toshiya Kanegawa has been on a tear recently. After achieving Top 8s in Shanghai and Singapore, he has now come to Beijing in search for greater glory. Now standing at a minimum of 21 Pro Points, Li Bo needed to win this one to qualify himself for Pro Tour Theros. It was a really important match for both of them and may the best man win!

    Game 1

    Kanegawa developed with Azorius Cluestone, ramping him into a Blaze Commando, which Li promptly killed with Auger Spree. Kanegawa flooded the board with Goblin Rally tokens, but luckily Li had Experiment One and Gatecreeper Vine to keep the tokens at home for a short moment.


    Li Bo

    Of course, Kanegawa's plan did not rely solely on those tokens and added Daring Skyjek, Ascended Lawmage plus Leyline Phantom to the board. Li could only manage to evolve his Experiment One into a 3/3 with Stonefare Crocodile.

    Kanegawa ignored all those, since he had a wealth of tokens to chump block with, and attacked for six with (now flying) Daring Skyjek and Ascended Lawmage. One more attack put Li at a life total low enough for Kanegawa to end things with a Warleader's Helix.

    Kanegawa 1 – Li 0

    Game 2

    Despite stumbling on mana, Li was able to recover by slapping Unflinching Courage on Stonefare Crocodile. That was good enough to race Kanegawa's Gore-House Chainwalker and Wojek Halberdiers, especially when Li added Tenement Crasher to the board.

    Warleader's Helix from Kanegawa removed the lifelinking alligator that had been causing him so much anguish but the 5/4 monstrosity eventually closed the game for Li.

    Kanegawa 1 – Li 1

    Game 3

    Seeing how both players had relatively fast decks, it was not surprising to see this game ending quickly. Kanegawa summoned Wojek Halberdiers and Azorius Cluestone. Li increased his mana-producing capacity by summoning Zhur-Taa Druid and Boros Cluestone.

    The industrious Wojek Halberdiers attacked for three, and then three more, and then three more, until Li finally had a creature. When Li tried to defend with Tenement Crasher, Kanegawa was ready with Totally Lost. When it came back for seconds, Kanegawa revealed Warleader's Helix from his hand.


    Toshiya Kanegawa

    Li resurrected the Crasher with Wildwood Rebirth, but by then, Wojek Halberdiers had already taken five punches and Li was on the brink of death. Kanegawa's next recruitment was the mighty Lavinia of the Tenth, shutting down Li's Zhur-Taa's Druid. Li could not produce any non-red creatures and eventually fell to the Azorius mazerunner, ending his hopes of attending the Pro Tour in Dublin.

    Kanegawa 2 – Li 1

    Toshiya Kanegawa defeats Li Bo and advances to the semifinals!




     

  • Quarterfinals – Daniel Godfrey vs. Wong Wei Quan

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen

  • Both players were playing in their very first Grand Prix Top 8 and were clearly very excited to be among the last 8 men standing. Wong Wei Quan hails from Singapore, who dropped by Beijing en route to attending the Pro Tour Dragon's Maze in San Diego. Opposite him was Daniel Godfrey, living less than 500 kilometers from Dublin, also needed the invite to Pro Tour Theros as well and would need to win this one in order to attend.

    Game 1

    The first game was pretty lopsided as Wong kept an iffy hand with little action, possibly mana-screwed. Despite starting with Foundry Street Denizen, Wong soon found himself being overwhelmed by Disciple of the Old Ways, Shambleshark, Opal Lake Gatekeepers (netting Godfrey a card, seeing that he laid Guildgates on turns one and three).


    Daniel Godfrey

    When Wong finally reached five mana, he tried to create a blockade with Towering Thunderfist but that plan was put on hold by Inaction Injunction. Wong took another hit and went down to just nine life. He added two Knight Watch tokens to the board, hoping not to get crushed on the next turn.

    However, Lavinia of the Tenth made an appearance and detained everything except the 4/4 Thunderfist, allowing Godfrey to reduce Wong down to one single life point and finishing him off the next turn with an all-out attack.

    Godfrey 1 – Wong 0

    Game 2

    Wong started poorly once again and found himself mana screwed. The situation looked dire, as Godfrey resolved Stealer of Secrets and then coming in for a card.

    Eventually, Wong managed to assemble a team of Skyknight Legionnaire, Knight Watch and Wojek Halberdiers, only to enter a brief stalemate against Godfrey's Crocanura and Opal Lake Gatekeepers.

    Godfrey didn't want to wait any longer and attacked with his team, eventually losing Stealer of Secrets to a token, and added yet another Opal Lake Gatekeepers to his side.

    His next attack was thwarted with a timely Martial Glory, causing him to lose a significant part of his once overpowering board. A Foundry Champion from Wong picked off the final creature and winning was merely a formality from that point.

    Godfrey 1 – Wong 1

    Game 3

    The mana gods were on Wong's side this time and he was able to quickly summon a slew of dangerous threats. Wojek Halberdiers stared down at Godfrey's Stealer of Secrets, while Wong added a pair of Nivix Cyclops and a very dangerous-looking Court Street Denizen.

    Godfrey had Opal Lake Gatekeepers but seemed to be in grave danger, since any instant or sorcery could transform Wong's board into a formidable force. True enough, Wong used Martial Glory as a "sorcery speed" Giant Growth on Wojek Halberdiers, transforming both cyclopes into 4/4s before crashing into the red zone.


    Wong Weiquan

    Godfrey blocked with his Gatekeepers, and used Chorus of Might to kill one of one-eyed monsters, but went down to 10 from this single attack. He was able to add a second Opal Lake Gatekeeper while drawing a card, but that was no match for the game-changing Foundry Champion.

    An Azorius Arrester and Dragonshift later, Wong Weiquan was off to the semifinals and Daniel Godfrey would have to be content with his great day thus far.

    Godfrey 1 – Wong 1

    Wong Weiquan beats Daniel Godfrey and advances to the semifinals! Congratulations on qualifying for Pro Tour Theros!




     

  • Semifinals – Zhou Quan vs. Toshiya Kanegawa

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen

  • Now that both players had secured their blue envelopes, their eyes were set on a slightly different prize now, the finalist trophy at the very least. Silently shuffling up, both players appeared to be slightly worned out from the long day of intense competition.

    Round 1

    Zhou won the die roll but Kanegawa was the first to kick start with Syndic of Tithes. It attacked into Corpse Blockade the very next turn, and the Japanese player used Dynacharge to clear it.


    Toshiya Kanegawa

    Zhou then added a bunch of tokens to the board via Centaur's Herald and Knight Watch and Kanegawa had to keep Daring Skyjek on defense.

    Lavinia of the Tenth had them detained for a full turn, allowing his creatures to rumble in for a quick jab. A subsequent Traitorous Instincts reduced Zhou to one lowly life. Unable to handle the freshly summoned Blaze Commando and Precinct Captain, Zhou scooped up his cards silently and reached for his sideboard.

    Zhou 0 – Kanegawa 1

    Round 2

    This time round, it was Zhou who administered the savage beating. Using Selesnya Cluestone, he was able to assemble a horde of monstrosities including Thrashing Mossdog, Maze Abomination and Pontiff of Blight.

    Kanegawa had a great start as well, but his smaller creatures like Daring Skyjek and Gore-House Chainwalker were quickly outclassed. He had Totally Lost to repel Maze Abomination. When Gore-House Chainwalker attacked next turn, Zhou bit the bait and blocked, resulting in the abomination falling to Warleader's Helix.

    A relatively useless Growing Ranks entered play on Zhou's side, and also Boros Mastiff, Hired Torturer. As Kanegawa's life total gradually declined thanks to the ridiculous Pontiff of Blight, he tried to inflict some damage with Smelt-Ward Gatekeepers and Lavinia of the Tenth.

    However, that plan didn't work so well and Kanegawa was forced to press the emergency reset button, Supreme Verdict. Zhou was not out of reinforcements and rebuilt with Gutter Skulk plus Alive & Well, eventually taking the game.

    Zhou 1 – Kanegawa 1

    Round 3

    After the previous lengthy game, it came down to this final one. Zhou wasted no time busting out of the gates with Judge's Familiar, Boros Mastiff and Fencing Ace. Kanegawa's first play of Armored Transport might be indestructible while attacking, but it was forced to trade with the Boros Mastiff to stem the bleeding.

    Mugging took care of the Fencing Ace and Kanegawa bought himself a turn of breathing room with Lavinia of the Tenth. This was rather annoying for Zhou indeed, since it detained the Cluestone he needed to cast Hired Torturer.


    Zhou Quan

    Nonetheless, he managed to resolve Maze Abomination once again and granted it Gift of Orzhova the very next turn. That was good enough to race Lavinia, and Kanegawa succumbed to the flying elemental of "Baneslayer Angel"-proportions.

    Zhou 2 – Kanegawa 1

    Zhou Quan triumphs over Toshiya Kanegawa and advances to the finals!




     

  • Semifinals – Kositaporn Nonthakorn vs. Wong Wei Quan

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen

  • Kositaporn Nonthakorn, affectionately known as "Non" amongst the Thai community, entered this tournament with a mere 2 Pro Points and little expectation. Now, he finds himself not only qualified for Pro Tour Theros, but also in the running for the honor of Thailand's National Champion, as well as the spot in the World Magic Cup that comes along with it.

    Wong Wei Quan has also been having a similarly spectacular weekend and remains one of the last four competitors in the tournament of 894 players.

    Game 1

    Non demonstrated exactly why Beetleform Mage is one of the best commons of Dragon's Maze. Unanswered, it ends the game in mere turns, and even faster with some bloodrush tricks or direct damage.


    Wong Wei Quan

    After casting Beetleform Mage on turn three, he untapped and cast Izzet Cluestone, giving him sufficient mana to fly in for four damage. Next turn, he knocked Wong down to 14 life, before adding Soulsworn Spirit alongside.

    Wong's deck was unable to serve up any removal for it and could only manage Court Street Denizen. Non sent in both his unblockable creatures for six more damage and ended things with Pyrewild Shaman the next turn.

    "No struggle" would be an apt way to describe Wong's predicament.

    Nonthakorn 1 – Wong 0

    Game 2

    Wong tried to equalize the match quickly, assembling the trio of Foundry Street Denizen, Sunspire Griffin and Rubblebelt Maaka.

    Non was not to be outdone and somewhat equalized his position with Gore-House Chainwalker, Beetleform Mage, Pyrewild Shaman and Tower Drake.

    Wong shoved all his creatures into the red zone and Non proceeded to block but his combat math was thrown out of the window with Martial Glory. This potent combat trick demolished Non's board and when Wong added two Knight Watch tokens, it was Non's turn to reach for the ropes.

    Nonthakorn 2 – Wong 1

    Game 3

    Evasion is important. That has been the one undeniable truth of limited play for the past two decades. After Non's Shambleshark got zapped by Electrickery, Vassal Soul and Soulsworn Spirit started to wreck havoc on Wong's life total.

    Despite having Court Street Denizen, Bloodfray Giant and Rubblebelt Maaka, the Singaporean player was unable to race effectively. Non had Pyrewild Shaman to deter Wong's "Hill Giant" and Hands of Binding to paralyze Bloodfray Giant for good.


    Kositaporn Nonthakorn

    Wong tried to get back in the game with Towering Thunderfist but what he really needed was a removal spell to end the ciphering madness. However, that was not to be and Wong eventually gave in to the pair of relentless spirits, ending his great run there and then. Good job regardless! Let's head to Pro Tour Theros together!

    Nonthakorn 2 – Wong 1

    Kositaporn Nonthakorn defeats Wong Wei Quan to become (possibly) the first Thai player to reach the finals of a Grand Prix!




     

  • Finals – Zhou Quan vs. Nonthakorn Kositaporn

    by Chapman Sim and Jim Jen

  • Yesterday, 894 hopefuls converged at Beijing, in the hopes of being crowned the Grand Prix Beijing Champion. Now, only 2 players remain and they are none other than local hero Zhou Quan as well as Thailand's Nonthakorn Kositaporn.

    After a short break, both players starting shuffling up each others deck while rolling the dice, actions that will dictate the outcome of this final match.

    Game 1

    Non had the fortune to begin first, but was cursed with a mulligan. Zhou quickly capitalized with Keening Apparition and Stonefare Crocodile. Non used Paralyzing Grasp on Keening Apparition then using Turn & Burn to rid himself of the lifelinking croc.


    Nonthakorn Kositaporn

    Zhou was not out of attackers though, and quickly refilled with Haazda Snare Squad and a centaur token via Alive & Well, but that was no match for Non's rare bomb, a Molten Primordial, which forced Kenning Apparition to sacrifice itself.

    Non's next move was to cast and return Krasis Incubation on Molten Primordial, turning it into an 8/6. Zhou shrugged it off with Smite. Now that the meanest monster was out of the way, Zhou had no problems winning with the rest of his smaller dudes, including freshly engaged Fencing Ace and Judge's Familiar.

    Zhou 1 - Nonthakorn 0

    Game 2

    Zhou attempted to zone in upon Non with Boros Mastiff and Keening Apparition but Non's Beetleform Mage held them back when he passed turn four with no play. Zhou was happy to advance his board with Selesnya Cluestone and Kraul Warrior, and was perfectly okay with Non having nothing to do.

    Non suddenly had a change of heart and decided to race. He attacked with Beetleform Mage and used Krasis Incubation on Zhou's Kraul Warrior, temporarily a mere Grizzly Bear. However, he had Kenning Apparition to undo that and then enchanted the Kraul Warrior with Gift of Orzhova.

    Trying to find an answer, Non dug with Urban Evolution, tapping out thereafter. Zhou pumped Kraul Warrior, and attacked for a twelve point life swing, leaving Non at 5 life and himself at 27. Non was not at the end of the road though, as he managed clog up the skies (a rare feat!) with Maze Glider, Runewing and Tower Drake, stopping the potentially 6/6 Kraul Warrior in its tracks.


    Zhou Quan

    The back-breaker turned out to be Alpha Authority, which prevented the Kraul Warrior from being double or triple blocked. At the end of his line, Non tried one of the last tricks in his almost exhausted arsenal. Using Catch & Release, he inquired if he could gain control of Alpha Authority in order to point Turn & Burn at the monster that was causing him so much anguish. Judges informed him that it was not possible because the Kraul Warrior still has hexproof, even though control of Alpha Authority had switched control.

    Zhou 2 – Kanegawa 1

    The writing was on the wall and Zhou Quan took a moment for the truth to sink in. He had just won Grand Prix Beijing.




     

  • Top 5 Cards of Grand Prix Beijing

    by Chapman Sim



  • 5. Guildgates

    How do you splash your best cards without clogging up your deck with "occasionally-clunky" Cluestones and Keyrunes? Playing with Guildgates rather than devoting precious slots in your deck means that you get to squeeze more goodies into your deck, while maintaining your land count at the average of 17. They also enhance cards like Ogre Jailbreaker, Greenside Watcher and the entire cycle of Gatekeepers. Guildgates have been and will continue to be a vital cornerstone in the world of Return to Ravnica Limited, all day, all weekend and possibly all season. Until the arrival of Theros, of course.






    4. Turn & Burn

    Heralded as the most insane split card of the set, it is not hard to understand why. This card wins games and also assisted Thailand's Nonthakorn Kositaporn in securing a couple of games! Both halves serve as decent removal individually, but when fused, the advantage is overwhelming. Totally throwing off combat math by taking down two of your opponent's creatures, Turn & Burn also grants immense tempo while generating card advantage all at the same time! Great in a blue deck, great in a red deck, and totally awesome if you're the Izzet Mage.







    3. Putrefy

    Historically speaking, cards the with text "destroy target creature" have always been prized for its sheer versatility. The ability to pick off an opposing bomb with no questions asked is a privilege that players were willing to spend their first picks on. Heck, even Grisly Spectacle deserves an honorable mentions. Today, this Murder upgrade is better than ever, disallowing regeneration and provides the option to occasionally smash an opposing Cluestone or Keyrune.








    2. Beetleform Mage

    The common consensus is that the format has become slower. The Simic player would love you to think that way as they ravage upon your life total with Beetleform Mage, alongside Cloudfin Raptors and other flyers. Left unchecked, the Beetleform Mage threatens to end the game in five turns, usually less in conjunction bloodrush pumps or direct damage. Difficult to kill and almost impossible to block profitably, Beetleform Mage is one of the best bargains you can get in the world of Dragon's Maze limited.







    1. Gift of Orzhova

    For the low low price of three mana, this nifty aura transforms an ordinary Grizzly Bear into an extraordinary racing machine, let alone when it's being stuck onto Kraul Warrior. Gift of Orzhova played an instrumental role in helping Zhou Quan achieve victory and remains one of the best cards in the entire block. Regardless whether you're a beatdown player at heart trying to close the game quickly or a control player requiring a potent win condition, you won't be disappointed with possibly the best "Flight" ever printed.






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