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Schünemann Storms to Victory in Ghent!

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Congratulations to Timo Schünemann the Grand Prix Ghent 2012 Champion!

Looking at the top eight of this Legacy Grand Prix here in Belgium, there was always the potential of a lightning fast final, with a number of combo decks still in the running. The crowd were not disappointed, with an all-German final of Elves vs Storm inevitably leading to some quick games.

When the dust settled it was Schünemann holding the trophy, winning the match in a flurry of ritual effects, culminating in a sizeable Tendrils of Agony. All weekend we've seen Legacy to be a diverse and high powered format. Whether casting Show and Tell to sneak some of the most formidable permanents in the game into play, or resolving double digits of spells in a single turn with any manner of combo decks, Legacy shows off the best of the history of Magic. Our top eight included seven distinct archetypes and, in a distinct departure from many recent results, not a single copy of Delver of Secrets. In spite of RUG Delver being the most played deck in the room, it seemed that other options were able to take down the deck that won in Atlanta, with a variety of other options including Maverick, various Show and Tell decks and even Lands finishing high up in the standings.

M13 has made its presence known, with Merfolk and Goblins each getting a shot in the arm with a new powerful creature, and in addition to this Omniscience saw its first significant tournament play as a new piece in the Show and Tell puzzle.

As the sun sets on the Grand Prix here in Ghent, and attentions almost certainly turn to the two Grand Prix happening on the other side of the Atlantic, there will be one man content to rest on his laurels, and be the first of three this weekend travelling home with a trophy. That man is Timo Schünemann, our Grand Prix champion!





Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Schünemann, Timo   Schünemann, Timo 2-0        
8 Tristan, Polzl   Schünemann, Timo 2-1
       
4 Klocker, Elias   Watsfeldt, Elias 2-1   Schünemann, Timo 2-1
5 Watsfeldt, Elias    
       
2 Sjoblom, Max   Maurer, Lukas 2-0
7 Maurer, Lukas   Maurer, Lukas 2-1
       
3 Marcotti, Emanuele   Marcotti, Emanuele 2-0
6 Milillo, Andrea    








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EVENT COVERAGE TWITTER

INFORMATION
 1.  Schünemann, Timo $3,500
 2.  Maurer, Lukas $2,300
 3.   Marcotti, Emanuele $1,500
 4.  Watsfeldt, Elias $1,500
 5.  Sjoblom, Max $1,000
 6.  Klocker, Elias $1,000
 7.   Milillo, Andrea $1,000
 8.  Tristan, Polzl $1,000
Pairings Results Standings
Final

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Green Bracket
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Blue Bracket
9
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9
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Top 8 Profiles

by Event Coverage Staff


Max Sjöblom

Age: 24
Hometown: Helsinki, Finland
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Pro Tour Philadelphia Top 8, national champion 2006, third at team worlds 2006, Finnish team captain for the 2012 World Magic Cup.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Miracle Control, got the list from Ensio Ask and really liked it. Has game against everything and smashes Elves and Maverick.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
Pretty much nothing.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Sigarda, Host of Herons, Worm Harvest.



Lukas Maurer

Age: 27
Hometown: Munich, Germany
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Getting labeled as "Manface" by the Grand Prix Amsterdam coverage staff.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Combo Elves. Experience with the deck, plus I think it's amongst the best decks.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
Linvala, Keeper of Silence gives the deck a hard time, so maybe Karakas in the sideboard.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Badlands.



Tristan Pölzl

Age: 24
Hometown: Montreuil, France
Occupation: None


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Top 8 at Bazaar of Moxen 6.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Junk Souls, because it has Knight of the Reliquary!

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
No changes. Already the best list!

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Omniscience.



Timo Schünemann

Age: 25
Hometown: Solingen, Germany
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Winning a piece of the Power Nine.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
UBr Ad Nauseam because Dredge betrayed me.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
I wouldn't change a thing.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Smokestack.



Elias Watsfeldt

Age: 19
Hometown: Gothenburg, Sweden
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Gold level! Reigning Swedish Legacy champion.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Show and Tell. Because it allows you to consistently get Emrakul/Progenitus on turn three.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
Plus two Karakas in the sideboard against Maverick and Reanimator. Otherwise I'm ambivalent about the sideboard because I did not draw Jace and Bitterblossom very often.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Linvala, Keeper of Silence against my Griselbrand, Surgical Extraction against my reanimation spells.



Elias Klocker

Age: 18
Hometown: [Austria]
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
Top 32 at Grand Prix Turin.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
GW Maverick

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
Probably cut the Sword of Light and Shadow.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Nimble Mongoose because Scavenging Ooze beat it every time.



Emanuele Marcotti

Age: 23
Hometown: Castelvetro Piacentino, Italy
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
It's my first Grand Prix. I only play local Eternal events.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Stoneblade with Lingering Souls because my brother has had good results with it recently.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
None.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?
Withered Wretch.



Andrea Milillo

Age: 24
Hometown: Mozzate, Italy
Occupation: Student


Previous Magic accomplishments:
It's my first Grand Prix, and I only played in one PTQ.

What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
Landstill, because no one wants to trade for my three Standstills.

What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
None. I would switch decks.

What was the most unusual card that was played against you this weekend?




 

Top 8 Decklists

by Event Coverage Staff





 

Quarterfinal - Elias Klocker vs. Elias Watsfeldt

by Rich Hagon


My desire to caption this one as 'The Elias Sports Bureau Presents' is enormous, but since only three of you reading this will understand the reference, I've decided against it. Instead, let's get to the action, with the two Eliaseseses facing each other with a place at the Pro Tour at stake for one of them, Mr. Klocker. Yesterday, Watsfeldt was on the verge of missing out on day two.

"My friend told me that if I didn't make day two, we could go to Paris today to see the last stage of the Tour de France. I don't think I like cycling. I decided that I had better start winning."

Now Watsfeldt finds himself in his second GP top 8, following a quarter final appearance at GP San Diego late last year. Klocker, meanwhile, is in his first elimination match in front of such a big crowd, and a win here would get him the coveted invite to Pro Tour Return to Ravnica in Seattle later this year.

Game 1

After a mulligan to 6, Klocker opened on Noble Hierarch. Watsfeldt converted Marsh Flats into a straightforward Swamp, and used Thoughtseize to reveal a Wasteland, Savannah, Elspeth, Knight-Errant, and Noble Hierarch. The Hierarch hit the graveyard. Duress was next from Watsfeldt, who took Elspeth, seeing a freshly-drawn Scryb Ranger for Klocker. Chrome Mox was imprinted with Brainstorm, with Flooded Strand ending the turn, leaving Klocker to flash in Scryb Ranger.

Elias Watsfeldt

He added a second Noble Hierarch, then watched Watsfeldt cast Lim-Dûl's Vault at end of turn. He plowed his way down to 6 life before he was satisfied with the set of 5 cards from the Vault. That set the stage for an Emrakul turn, presumably...

Yep. Show and Tell. Emrakul. Good game.

Klocker 0 - 1 Watsfeldt

Game 2

Both players kept their opening 7 for game 2, with Ponder from Watsfeldt the first action. Turn two saw Stoneforge Mystic from Klocker. Watsfeldt wasted no time fetching Swamp from Marsh Flats. He laid Chrome Mox, imprinting Personal Tutor, and cast Show and Tell, revealing Emrakul...

Submerge cleared the way, but Klocker wasn't done, using Crop Rotation to find Karakas. That's quite good against Emrakul, apparently. With Emrakil now back in hand, Watsfeldt had to regroup. Klocker flashed out Scryb Ranger, then started his turn with Wasteland for Underground Sea. Watsfeldt fell to a still-manageable 15 with the attack. Krosan Grip for his Chrome Mox stunted his mana further. He cast Thoughtseize to take away Knight of the Reliquary, while Klocker took his chance to get Umezawa's Jitte onto the board.

Thalia, Guardian of Thraben was next, as the Klocker attacks gathered momentum, thanks to the Jitte. Despite a turn two Emrakul, that Crop Rotation for Karakas had saved the day for Klocker, and forced a deciding game 3.

Klocker 1 - 1 Watsfeldt.

Game 3

Both players thought hard about their 7s before keeping. Watsfeldt used Personal Tutor for Show and Tell on turn one, Klocker replying with Noble Hierarch. After drawing the Show and Tell, Watsfeldt laid a Swamp, and passed. Watsfeldt looked surprised when Klocker passed without a turn two play. Watsfeldt aimed for Lim-Dûl's Vault at end of turn, which Klocker nodded through. How good a hand could Watsfeldt construct from his 'favorite five'?

Elias Klocker

It didn't take him long. Chrome Mox imprinted Force of Will. Show and Tell landed Knight of the Reliquary for Klocker, and Progenitus for Watsfeldt. Klocker went for Aven Mindcensor, and saw Submerge return his Knight of the Reliquary. He replayed it, and attacked Watsfeldt to 17. Another Submerge sent the Knight packing, and it was all over.

Elias Klocker 1 - 2 Elias Watsfeldt




 

Semifinal - Timo Schünemann vs. Elias Watsfeldt

by Rich Hagon


Legacy, you may have heard, is quite a powerful format, where some seriously nutty things go on. If you have heard this, you are not wrong, and if you haven't, you're about to find out how true that is, as both Schünemann and Watsfeldt have some pretty saucy things on the docket.

Game 1

Schünemann opened the semi final with Gitaxian Probe, finding two Duress, Brainstorm, Marsh Flats, Scalding Tarn, Verdant Catacombs, and Polluted Delta. Schünemann turned his own Polluted Delta into Underground Sea. Cabal Therapy took Brainstorm, leaving the two Duress to Watsfeldt. Duress number one revealed Tendrils of Agony, Cabal Therapy, Burning Wish, and two land. Unsurprisingly, it was the Burning Wish that hit the graveyard. Back came Cabal Therapy from Schünemann, taking away the second Duress. Ponder saw Watsfeldt leave the cards on top, before Polluted Delta reset the top of the deck. Personal Tutor for Show and Tell completed a solid turn.

Elias Watsfeldt

Marsh Flats became a third Underground Sea for Watsfeldt, who cast Show and Tell, revealing Progenitus opposite nothing but land for Schünemann. Three sacs later, he had a very different lineup of lands, but they were still, you know, lands. Tendrils of Agony was hardcast, taking Schünemann a miniscule amount of life further from death. After Progenitus smashed him extremely hard in the face, he cast Brainstorm. Then Lotus Petal. Then Dark Ritual. Then Infernal Tutor. He found Past in Flames, but Watsfeldt showed Daze at the ready.

Schünemann 0 - 1 Watsfeldt

Game 2

Inquisition of Kozilek let Schünemann see two Force of Will, Ponder, Emrakul, Progenitus, Chrome Mox, and an Underground Sea. Away went Ponder, leaving Watsfeldt to start the game with Chrome Mox imprinting Progenitus, plus the Underground Sea. Schünemann didn't get to Ponder either, Watsfeldt opting to cast Force of Will, pitching the second Force of Will. Why quickly became clear, as he cast Lim-Dûl's Vault at end of turn. With two Force of Will gone, could he get past the Schünemann defence? Duress from Schünemann saw land and Emrakul in hand - the Show and Tell was up second from the Vault.

Schünemann now had to go for it. He cast two Lion's Eye Diamond, then Ad Nauseam. 19, 17, 13 off Past in Flames, 11 Burning Wish, 10 Brainstorm, 8 Burning Wish, 7 Gitaxian Probe, 5 Infernal Tutor, 4 Cabal Therapy - 'nom nom nom nom nom'. That wasn't Watsfeldt saying that...

Schünemann completed the proscribed endgame, and we were tied at one.

Schünemann 1 - 1 Watsfeldt

Game 3

Watsfeldt kept 7, while Schünemann quickly sent his back. He kept 6.

Chrome Mox imprinting Personal Tutor was Watsfeldt's opening, with Verdant Catacombs. Duress was met with Brainstorm in response, allowing Watsfeldt to hide Daze and Show and Tell on top of his library before the Duress could resolve. When it did, Schünemann found Progenitus, Force of Will, Duress, and a Marsh Flats in hand, with the Duress getting taken. Watsfeldt went straight into Show and Tell, of course, revealing Progenitus. Schünemann chose not to reveal, and the play passed to the German.

Timo Schünemann

He cast Brainstorm, with a lot of options in hand. Next was Dark Ritual, with Schünemann confident of victory - 'I'm trying to decide how to kill you...'. Cabal Ritual followed, then Lion's Eye Diamond, Infernal Tutor for another Cabal Ritual (now with threshold), then flashback Past in Flames...

You know the rest. Storm...spell..storm...more storm... spell...Duress...storm... mana... Christmas...storm...Tuesday...

Tendrils of Agony.

Kill you.

Told you Legacy was a powerful format.

Timo Schünemann 2 - 1 Elias Watsfeldt




 

Top 32 Decklists (9-32)

by Event Coverage Staff


Thomas Enevoldsen - 12th
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Peter Floderus - 13th
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Samuele Estratti - 21st
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

João Alveirinho - 23rd
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Jonathan Alexander Kurz - 24th
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Nuno Miranda - 28th
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Urs Glaubitt - 30th
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32

Danny Ecker - 31st
Grand Prix Ghent 2012 - Top 32




 

Semifinal - Emanule Marcotti vs. Lukas Maurer

by Tim Willoughby


Any time there is an Italian in the top 8 of a Grand Prix there is quite a crowd, and with Emanuele Marcotti here now, it was no different. His Esper Stoneblade deck was up against the elves deck of Lukas Maurer of Germany, and if he won, he would be facing Timo Schünemann, also of Germany, but playing a different combo deck in Storm.

Game 1

A turn one Inquisition of Kozilek saw Forest, Birchlore Rangers, three copies of Quirion Ranger, Wirewood Symbiote and Elvish Visionary. The Symbiote hit the bin, and Marcotti passed, challenging Maurer to do his worst. A Fyndhorn Elves came off the top and straight into play as the most straightforward form of acceleration the German could go for.

A turn two Stoneforge Mystic from Marcotti fetched... well, nothing.

Lukas Maurer

"A little bit unlucky" remarked Marcotti, who already had both Umezawa's Jitte and Batterskull in hand.

Maurer was quick to take any shot he could, and used Fyndhorn Elves, Quirion Ranger and Birchlore Rangers to get mana to cast Elvish Visionary – a quickly deployed squad ready to do something special.

Marcotti cast Ponder, seeing Thoughtsezie Lingering Souls and Force of Will. He thought for a little (appropriate considering he was casting Ponder) and stacked things such that Force of Will was on top, to remain safe against anything too explosive from his opponent.

A Green Sun's Zenith for one resolved, fetching Wirewood Symbiote. The Symbiote would let Maurer bounce and recast his Elvish Visionary, but Marcotti was not about to let the German get too crazy. When Visionary came back, it was hit by Force of Will. Thoughtseize from Marcotti left Maurer with just a Forest.

While Marcotti's Stoneforge Mystic had yet to deploy any equipment, the threat of it doing so was enough to keep Maurer honest about entering the red zone. Maurer cast another Green Sun's Zenith, this time finding Ezuri, Renegade Leader. Now he would have an attacking force to be reckoned with.

Marcotti got his Batterskull on, but was looking in ropey shape to team Elf. Heritage Druid would be an efficient source of mana, but Maurer felt no need to rush things.

As Umezawa's Jitte entered the battlefield for Marcotti, and got equipped to the Batterskull Germ, it looked that Marcotti was pulling ahead. In reality he wasn't getting far at all though, as Wirewood Symbiote could bounce Maurer's blocker, meaning that neither lifelink, nor Jitte's triggers would happen.

Marcotti looked to the sky. "Swords to Plowshares! I need it!"

It was Maurer who had the better draws though, with Elvish Visionary which would be a veritable card drawing machine, especially once he found a second Wirewood Symbiote. The game wasn't over, but it clearly wasn't far off. "I give up" declared Marcotti, scooping up his cards.

"I'll take it" muttered Maurer. He went 1-0 up.

Lukas Maurer 1 – 0 Emanuele Marcotti

Game 2

The Italian's luck with his second opener was not great, but at least neither was Maurer's. Both players took a mulligan. While Marcotti's six card hand was keepable, the same could not be said of his opponent, who went to five.

That five soon became four, as Thoughseize saw Dryad Arbor, Glimpse of Nature, Viridian Shaman, Heritage Druid and Wirewood Symbiote. The Glimpse went away, leaving an unexplosive hand for Maurer to work with. His turn one Dryad Arbor was unable to even tap for mana as it came in, and Marcotti was decisive in declaring "Jitte" as soon as he cast Stoneforge Mystic. Time to take control of things.

Emanuele Marcotti

Wirewood Symbiote came from Maurer, who took an attack before losing the insect to Swords to Plowshares. Quirion Ranger was the next play from Maurer, which was the perfect answer to Marcotti's Umezawa's Jitte in the short term. The Ranger would let Maurer block and bounce with Dryad Arbor to keep Jitte from gaining counters, at the expense of missing land drops.

This plan would be fine for a while, but sooner or later Maurer would have to do something else, as his board would not be developing. Marcotti forced the issue with Snapcaster Mage on Swords to Plowshares on Quirion Ranger.

Soon later Maurer was left in the awkward position of wanting to scoop up his cards, but being unable to due to not having any permanents, as Umezawa's Jitte killed off his lone land.

Lukas Maurer 1 – 1 Emanuele Marcotti

Game 3

The largely Italian crowd was at this point doing Mexican waves while celebrating the win, eager to see their countryman lock up a finals slot. For the rubber game, both players kept, and Maurer started with Pendelhaven and Nettle Sentinel.

Thoughtseize saw Quirion Ranger, Birchlore Rangers, Nettle Sentinel, Scavenging Ooze and Dryad Arbor. Quirion Ranger went away, but Maurer was still going to have quite a spicy turn, attacking in with his first Nettle Sentinel, before using it and Birchlore Rangers to cast his second one.

Marcotti cast Ponder, seeing an unexciting Force of Will, Flooded Strand and Tundra. He shuffled them away, instead getting a Stoneforge Mystic. Maurer cast an Elvish Visionary using his Nettle Sentinels, before attacking with his team. A Swords to Plowshares got rid of one Nettle Sentinel, but even so, Marcotti was at 10 life from straightforward beatdowns.

Marcotti did not have a play for the turn, and looked on as Gaea's Cradle further enabled Maurer to explode out of the gates. Attacks from Maurer were met with Snapcaster Mage, allowing a flashback on Swords to Plowshares, to remove Elvish Visionary. The Mage did not block, and after combat Maurer had a Pithing Needle naming Umezawa's Jitte.

Stoneforge Mystic from Marcotti found Batterskull, and Marcotti passed, on just 8 life, but with the potential to gain some back with his equipment given appropriate time. A Glimpse of Nature from Maurer resolved. From here came Fyndhorn Elves, Scavenging Ooze, Llanowar Elves, Elvish Visionary, Wirewood Symbiote, Elvish Visionary (again thanks to the Symbiote), a second Glimpse of Nature, Elvish Visionary...

At this point Marcotti had seen enough. He stood up and extended his hand, and with a round of applause Lukas Maurer advanced to the finals.

Lukas Maurer wins 2-1, advancing to what will be an all combo finals!




 

Final - Timo Schünemann vs. Lukas Maurer

by Tobi Henke


In this all-German final, Timo Schünemann, playing in his first Top 8, and his Ad Nauseam storm combo deck were up against Elf player Lukas Maurer, likewise in his first Top 8.

Game 1

Schünemann had earned the right to go first by virtue of his Swiss finish and did so, keeping his opening seven. Maurer did not, but was fine with six. However, it might not actually be six, as Schünemann started with Cabal Therapy naming Glimpse of Nature. The Therapy missed but showed a hand of Forest, Priest of Titania, Birchlore Rangers, two copies of Elvish Visionary, and Green Sun's Zenith. The latter was then used by Maurer to go get Dryad Arbor.

Schünemann, happy in the knowledge that it would be at least some time before Maurer's Elves could pose a serious threat, cast Brainstorm and Inquisition of Kozilek, which revealed that Maurer had found a lucky Gaea's Cradle on top of his library. Maurer lost his Priest of Titania, but ripped Glimpse of Nature from the top of his deck and cast it. Down came Birchlore Rangers, followed by Gaea's Cradle tapping for two (thanks to Dryad Arbor and the Rangers) to cast Elvish Visionary, followed by Quirion Ranger untapping Birchlore Rangers, followed by Fyndhorn Elves.

Lukas Maurer

Ponder and Gitaxian Probe gave Schünemann the cards he needed, both in hand as well as a seventh in his graveyard. "Finally," he commented. Dark Ritual was chained into Cabal Ritual, followed by two Lotus Petals and an Infernal Tutor hellbent on destruction. Schünemann got Past in Flames, with enough mana floating in his pool to cast it. After that it was all but over. Schünemann flashed back a couple of cards to generate even more mana, re-used Infernal Tutor to find Tendrils of Agony, and pointed the card (and all eleven of its storm copies) at Maurer's head.

Timo Schünemann 1 – 0 Lukas Maurer

Game 2

Maurer had Pendelhaven and Fyndhorn Elves on turn one. His opponent's Gitaxian Probe revealed a hand of two more lands, Glimpse of Nature, Nettle Sentinel, and Elvish Visionary. Schünemann followed it up with Inquisition of Kozilek getting rid of Glimpse of Nature. Maurer summoned Elvish Visionary plus Nettle Sentinel and passed the turn.

Schünemann, on his second turn, cast Ponder and was ready to combo. He cast Dark Ritual off Badlands to pay for Infernal Tutor, revealing one Lion's Eye Diamond from his hand. The Tutor turned that into two Diamonds, which he played along with one Lotus Petal. The Petal allowed him to cast a second Infernal Tutor to which he responded by sacrificing both Diamonds. Now hellbent, the Tutor searched up Ill-Gotten Gains.


In response to Ill-Gotten Gains, however, Maurer used Faerie Macabre to remove the two Infernal Tutors from Schünemann's graveyard. "I really didn't expect that," Schünemann admitted. His options what to get back from his graveyard were reduced to Lotus Petal, one Lion's Eye Diamond, and Ponder. Ponder missed and Schünemann was forced to pass the turn to Maurer who now had his Glimpse of Nature back in hand thanks to Ill-Gotten Gains.

Glimpse and lots of creatures followed, among them multiples of Nettle Sentinel, Wirewood Symbiote, and Quirion Ranger, the latter two instrumental in allowing Maurer to keep going. Unfortunately, he couldn't find a single Heritage Druid or Birchlore Rangers and had to pass back to Schünemann. However, after this thwarted combo attempt, the storm player was down to a single card in hand and was simply overrun by Elves on Maurer's next turn.

Timo Schünemann 1 – 1 Lukas Maurer

Game 3

For the deciding game, Schünemann once again kept his seven while Maurer mulliganed ... first to six cards without land, then to: Forest, Wirewood Symbiote, Glimpse of Nature double Elvish Visionay, which he kept.

Timo Schünemann

Schünemann started on Ponder, Maurer on Wirewood Symbiote. On turn two, Schünemann had Burning Wish and picked Pyroclasm from his sideboard. Maurer missed on land (or one-drop) and passed without play.

Schünemann's Gitaxian Probe let him see what was going on in Maurer's hand, which had grown by one unhelpful Priest of Titania and one Ezuri, Renegade Leader in the meantime. Next turn, Dark Ritual and Cabal Ritual provided the mana—and Ad Nauseam provided the extra cards. The game ended in flurry of Rituals and mana artifacts with another Burning Wish getting Tendrils of Agony for way more loss of life than Maurer could afford to lose.

Congratulations to Timo Schünemann, winner of Grand Prix Ghent 2012!




 

Final - Timo Schünemann vs. Lukas Maurer

by Tobi Henke




5. Omniscience

In the end the now infamous Omniscience deck came short a couple of wins, but it did put two of its three pilots into day two, and was one of the early big stories of the tournament. Dumping the ten-mana enchantment onto the battlefield as early as turn one with the help of Ancient Tomb, Lotus Petal, and Show and Tell, former PT champ Simon Görtzen and former GP champ Florian Koch surprised quite a few of their opponents. And casting Emrakul for free is obviously so much nicer than simply putting it on the table by other means.








4. Wasteland

Hardly anyone ever talks about this card anymore, for pretty much the same reason you don't constantly talk about air or sunshine: people simply take those things for granted. But there may not be another card in the Legacy format whose influence is more pervasive. Whenever people construct a mana base or try to figure out how much mana they can expect to have on which turn of the game, Wasteland is always a factor that can only be ignored at one's own peril.








3. Terminus

Bolstered by a strong match-up against the ever-popular Maverick and against the increasing numbers of tribal decks, UW Miracles proved to be a real player this weekend, maybe even a mover or shaker. Terminus certainly shakes things up and moves cards around. Thanks in large part to the one-mana Wrath of God, Legacy finally has a genuine control deck again. Players like Hall of Famer Raphaël Lévy, Max Sjöblom, and Andrea Milillo chose the deck, and the latter two both made it all the way to the Top 8 with it.








2. Wirewood Symbiote

Wirewood Symbiote may not be the most flashy card in the Elf deck, that title probably belongs to Glimpse of Nature or maybe Heritage Druid. But Wirewood Symbiote does so many things, protecting its Elf friends from removal, untapping them, having them block opposing creatures with Umezawa's Jitte all day, or simply returning Elvish Visionary to one's hand for an additional card, because sometimes all it takes is one additional card. Throughout the weekend we've seen many Elf decks doing amazing things with Wirewood Symbiote all through to the final where.








1. Gitaxian Probe

When looking at Gitaxian Probe, storm combo does not immediately come to mind, but that's where the card did its best work during this Grand Prix. In champion Timo Schünemann's Ad Nauseam deck Gitaxian Probe provided an extra spell for storm, an extra card in the graveyard to achieve threshold for Cabal Ritual, not to mention that he was able to look at his opponents' hands, allowing him to better time his many discard spells, to better aim his Cabal Therapy, and to know when the way was clear for his combo kill. All at the top bargain price of no card investment and no mana investment at all. Deal!









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