gppro11

A Legacy Champion Descends from Jupiter

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Who says you need Force of Will to win in Legacy? Having virtually locked up the Northeast Legacy Championships at Jupiter Games in Binghamton, NY, an old stronghold for the Legacy and Vintage crowds, James Rynkiewicz went old school on the competition on his way to becoming champion at Grand Prix Providence. Using a version of Bant featuring no Force of Wills and shunning the Natural Order/Progenitus combo, Rynkiewicz stuck to Knights of the Reliquary and Vendilion Cliques to beat his opponents into submission. He had a hard go of it in the finals, dropping the first game against Bryan Eleyet's Hive Five combo deck. With his back against the wall, he battled back in straight games to take the title.

This was another weekend showcasing the awesome variety and power of Legacy. Once again, there were eight distinct deck types in the Top 8 of the Grand Prix, adding to the fourteen distinct winners of the Grand Prix Trials on Friday. Variety is the name of the game, and it makes Legacy incredibly appealing, and devilishly hard to prepare for. It is also one of the quickest-shifting formats, with new cards spawning new decks and rendering other useless with each new set that is released. The big breakout for this tournament was Mental Misstep, which appeared in virtually every deck playing sources of blue mana.

Once again, Legacy has provided some great surprises. Hive Mind made the finals. Protean Hulk was given a resurrection. A blue deck without Force of Will won the whole thing! Not to mention the fact that a Legacy grinder finally broke through and took home a Legacy Grand Prix title. Rynkiewicz had to do it through Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa, too, earning his spot at the top and a trophy as the Grand Prix Providence champion!



Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals Champion
1 Reid Duke Reid Duke, 2-1
8 Alex Majlaton Bryan Eleyet, 2-1
4 Bryan Eleyet Bryan Eleyet, 2-0 James Rynkiewicz, 2-1
5 Owen Turtenwald
2 James Rynkiewicz James Rynkiewicz 2-0
7 John Kubilis James Rynkiewicz 2-0
3 Paulo Vitor Damo Da Rosa Paulo Vitor Damo Da Rosa, 2-0
6 Wilson Hunter


Follow live streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Providence at ggslive.com with Rashad Miller and Ray Punzalan.

EVENT COVERAGE TWITTER
  • by Brian David-Marshall
    Finals:
    James Rynkiewicz vs. Bryan Eleyet

  • by Nate Price
    Semifinals:
    Semifinals Round-Up

  • by Brian David-Marshall
    Quarterfinals:
    Reid Duke vs. Alex Majlaton

  • by Nate Price
    Quarterfinals:
    Quarterfinal Round-Up

  • by Nate Price
    Top 8:
    Player Profiles

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 8
    Decklists

  • by Nate Price and Brian David-Marshall
    Feature:
    Top 5 Cards

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 2 Coverage:
    Blogs, Feature Matches, and More
  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 1 Coverage:
    Blogs, Feature Matches, and More

  • by Brian David-Marshall
    Column: Legacy Writers Roundtable
  • by Mike Flores
    Column: Legacy Crash Course

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Info: Fact Sheet

INFORMATION
INFORMATION
  1.   James Rynkiewicz $3,500
  2.   Bryan Eleyet $2,300
  3.   Reid Duke $1,500
  4.   Paulo Vitor Damo Da Rosa $1,500
  5.   Owen Turtenwald $1,000
  6.   Wilson Hunter $1,000
  7.   John Kubilis $1,000
  8.   Alex Majlaton $1,000
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  • Feature – Top 5 Cards

    by Nate Price and Brian David-Marshall
  • 5.) Stoneforge Mystic

    Is there a card in Magic that is having as good a time as Stoneforge Mystic right now? It is one of the most defining cards in some of the best decks across every format but Vintage. One of the aspects that makes the card so powerful is the versatility of it. What makes it strong actually changes in each format. Here in Legacy, the ability to slip one in and then slide a Batterskull under a Standstill or around counterMagic is amazing in Legacy, where those cards are very prevalent. Not to mention that the versatility to fetch Umezawa's Jitte against creature decks or Sword of Feast and Famine against Team America is incredibly important.



    4.) Hive Mind

    Hive Mind was not a combo deck on a lot of people's Legacy radar coming into this weekend -- unless you have been paying attention to the MTGO Legacy Daily Events. Bryan Eleyet from Spokane, Washington was one of a handful of people playing the eponymous archetype that had some minor success in Extended a couple of seasons ago. Players dismissed the deck as a joke while Bryan quietly made short work of a very tough day two field and set up permanent residence in the Feature Match area down the back half of Day Two.

    People continually thought there was some way to counter the copy of the Pact that they were compelled to put on the stack -- be it Summoner's or Of The Titan -- but they quickly learned that counter spells are functionally useless once Hive Mind is on the board.



    3.) Dryad Arbor

    Dryad Arbor is an innocuous looking card, but it is no innocent. It's a beast in disguise. It serves as a crucial target for another card on this list. It serves as a sacrifice for Natural Order. It swings down from the trees (or Misty Rainforests, or Windswept Heaths…) to block unsuspecting attackers. It holds Swords and Jittes. It wins games. Now you know, so don't blame me if it catches you unawares.



    2.) Green Sun's Zenith

    Here's that other card I was talking about. Combined with Dryad Arbor, they create the backbone of most of the green decks in the format. This card is just amazingly versatile. For what it's worth, it's effectively the best creature at every casting cost. It also works as cheap mana ramp, fetching the aforementioned Arbor from the deck on the first turn. It shuffles back into the deck, so you always have the potential to draw gas. It has allowed deck designers to do something that was unthinkable in times past: play less than four of cards that were previously thought of as staples. The Grand Prix winning decklist ran only a single Tarmogoyf, but it compensated for this with a full set of Zeniths. Other decks use it to run silver bullets to get opponents, or to set up their combo. It just allows for so much design space… it will be interesting to see how this card is used in tournaments to come.



    1.) Mental Misstep

    Here it is, the elephant in the room. This card has seen so much hype since the previews for New Phyrexia came out that it was set up to either fail or succeed wildly. After a weekend of play, I'll definitely say that this has been a success. It has changed how many things in this format work. Almost single-handedly, it has slowed down the format and made Goblins significantly worse. It has forced many blue decks to react to the fact that it even exists by playing it as well. It has given combo decks another weapon to try to protect their combo. Now that the dust has settled, I'd call the experiment a success, though I'm sure it will level off as the metagame readjusts itself in the future.




     

  • Top 8 – Decklists

    by Event Coverage Staff
  • Reid Duke - Top 8
    Grand Prix-Providence 2011 (Legacy)

    Alex Majlaton - Top 8
    Grand Prix-Providence 2011 (Legacy)

    Owen Turtenwald - Top 8
    Grand Prix-Providence 2011 (Legacy)


     

  • Top 8 – Player Profiles

    by Nate Price

  • Name:
    Bryan Eleyet

    Hometown:
    Portland, OR (Currently Spokane)

    Occupation:
    AT&T Tech Rep

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    3rd Day 2, Qualified for PT Berlin via PTQ

    What deck did you play and why?
    Hive Mind, This could be a thousand words or more. It's a great deck.

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    Kyle Jefferson (KylezJ on MODO) Bryan Jones, Eric Ervin

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    So skill intensive, great emerging tournament scene. I just top 8'd a GP?

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Grim Monolith, any version without it is strictly worse

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Glistner Elf


    Name:
    Wilson Hunter

    Hometown:
    Boone, NC

    Occupation:
    Student / Sales Representative

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    FNM Top 8s! Occasionally…

    What deck did you play and why?
    Painted Stone. It's my favorite against the majority of the field right now and Zoo seems to be scarce

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    I played in the back seat of a car on the way here with Mike Braverman, Dale McKinney and Dylan Squire. Shout out to Khai Hoang and Phil Braverman who couldn't make it.

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    It is so wide open and it rewards tight play. You are less likely to lose to a mulligan.

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Red Elemental Blast. One Mana, instant speed Vindicates or Counterspells are good.

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Batterskull did surprisingly well today.


    Name:
    James Rynkiewicz / Jimirynk

    Hometown:
    Poughkeepsie, NY

    Occupation:
    Spell Slinger

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    To 20 GP Ohio a couple of SCG Top 8/16's and a win

    What deck did you play and why?
    NoFoW, it was good in testing and I wanted to see if I could build a Forceless New Horizons

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    I built the deck and won a Jupiter Games tournament.

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    You can play anything that you want

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Brainstorm

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Batterskull was everywhere


    Name:
    Alex Majlaton

    Hometown:
    Lanham, MD

    Occupation:
    Trophy Husband

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    T8 GP Charlotte and GP Tampa

    What deck did you play and why?
    Merfolk, it's pretty straightforward and inexpensive (relatively)

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    A brother named George and some one fifty ones.

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    Nothing, every deck is really really bad

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Arcbound Ravager, because you can sacrifice your artifacts to it.

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    My friend Jason Lundbers played a deck with Glistener Elf


    Name:
    Owen Turtenwald

    Hometown:
    West Allis

    Occupation:
    Writer for ChannelFireball.com

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    7 GP Top 8s

    What deck did you play and why?
    U/W Stoneforge Mystic because it is new, different and very good.

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    Playing lots of games with Greg Hatch and Matt Boccio. Theorizing with Martin Juza, Lukas Blohon and my channelfirebuddies.

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    You get to play with and against tons of different interesting decks

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Daze (Shoulda played around it!)

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Batterskull


    Name:
    Paulo Vitor Domo de Rosa

    Hometown:
    Porto Alegro

    Occupation:
    Student / Player

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    I'm the youngest player in the top 95 all time pro point list

    What deck did you play and why?
    BUG Landstill, I just thought it was good

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    Played a little with my friends online and talked to the ChannelFireball people

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    People just play what they want, even if it is bad

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Mishra's Factory, it does so much for being a land but it is not unfair like Wasteland

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    I don't think I saw any unexpected cards from New Phyrexia, it was mostly Mental Misstep and Batterskull


    Name:
    Reid Duke

    Hometown:
    Sugar Loaf, NY

    Occupation:
    Jewler

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    5th Place – 2010 Magic Online Championship

    What deck did you play and why?
    Natural Order RUG because NO is usually a one card win combo. Red offers great sideboard cards and corrects the bad matchups.

    How and with whom did you prepare for this event?
    Practice with Ian Duke and in smaller Legacy events

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    Thirteen rounds and I didn't face any one deck three times

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Natural Order! In Standard, I play for turn three Liliana Vess, in Extended, turn 3 Elspeth, in Legacy, turn 3 Progenitus.

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Phyrexian Obliterator


    Name:
    John Kubilis

    Hometown:
    Worcester, MA

    Occupation:
    Programmer / Analyst

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Nothing Special, PTQ Finals, Regionals Top 8

    What deck did you play and why?
    Zoo because it's awesome and I can't mess up with it, no matter how hard I try.

    What is your favorite part about the Legacy format?
    The fact that I played two times in the last three months and still did well

    What is your favorite card that is available in Legacy, but not Extended or Standard and why?
    Price of Progress because I tap two mana and my opponent dies.

    What was the most surprising New Phyrexia card you saw being played this weekend?
    Omen Machine


     

  • Quarterfinals Roundup

    by Nate Price
  • Bryan Eleyet vs. Owen Turtenwald

    Owen Turtenwald

    This match went by quite quickly. Turtenwald holed up under a Standstill with a Stoneforge Mystic, intending to use it to sneak a Batterskull into play. Eleyet popped the Standstill for a Hive Mind to try and win, and Turtenwald failed to draw into countermagic. A Summoner's Pact put Eleyet up a game.

    For the second game, Turtenwald set up Meddling Mage on Show and Tell, preventing Eleyet from sneaking Hive Mind into play. Eleyet actually held the Show and Tell, so it saved him a turn-two death.

    Bryan Eleyet
    With the sneaky way blocked, Eleyet used Intuition to grab a Force of Will to protect him when he went off on the following turn. Eleyet dropped the Hive Mind, which Turtenwald let resolve. When Eleyet tried to cast Pact of the Titan, Turtenwald tried to Daze his copy, but Eleyet used Hive Mind to copy the Daze, Dazing Turtenwald's Daze. Realizing how it worked and knowing he had no way to win through that Force of Will, Turtenwald conceded. Instead of a turn-two kill, Eleyet had to settle for a turn-three kill.


    Bryan Eleyet 2 – Owen Turtenwald 0


    Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa vs. Wilson Hunter

    PV resolved a Deed against Hunter with one mana up early in game one. Hunter immediately resolved a Painter's Servant and Pyroblasted the Deed, forcing PV to blow it for one, killing a Mox Opal and forcing Hunter to spin his Sensei's Divining Top. PV set up a Jace, the Mind Sculptor and started using it to force hunter to replay his Servant. That kept him busy long enough for PV to get a Mishra's Factory into play and then set up a Standstill. Hunter had taken so much damage from his Ancient Tomb by that point that all PV had to do was juggle things for a couple of turns while he attacked with his Factory to seal things.

    In the second game, Hunter found himself locked down to one land thanks to some Wasteland action from PV. He had a Mox Opal, but PV wouldn't allow him to get a third artifact for metalcraft. With options limited and a quick clock from Mishra's Factory and Vendilion Clique, Hunter dropped fast. A Pernicious Deed from PV sealed the deal.

    Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa 2 – Wilson Hunter 0

    John Kubilis vs. James Rynkiewicz

    Dryad Arbor with a Sword of Feast and Famine set the tone early for Rynkiewicz. Knight of the Reliquary came down to pick it up soon thereafter. Kubilis's Qasali Pridemage blew up the Sword, but the burly Knight finished things off. Kubilis was very light on creatures for his draw, allowing Rynkiewicz to be the aggressor.

    Rynkiewicz had a Tarmogoyf followed by a Knight of the Reliquary for the second game. All Kubilis had to match it was a Wild Nacatl. Rynkiewicz made a Sylvan Safekeeper to keep his team…well, safe, but not before losing his Knight to a Swords to Plowshares. Kubilis had a Knight of the Reliquary of his own hiding on top of his library, but he couldn't find a third land for it, even with the help of Sylvan Library. Things got even worse when Rynkiewicz started using his Knight of the Reliquary and Maze of Ith to attack and search for more Wastelands to lock Kubilis out.

    John Kubilis 0 – James Rynkiewicz 2


     

  • Quarterfinals – Reid Duke (NO RUG) vs. Alex Majlaton (Merfolk)

    by Brian David-Marshall
  • Reid Duke has been making a name for himself since surfacing on the Pro Tour scene last year as a MOCS competitor at the World Championships in Chiba. From Orange County, New York, Duke recently made the Top 8 of the Wizard World Series in New York and has started to write a regular column about Magic.

    Alex Majlaton hails from Maryland and these two players have crossed paths before on the East Coast PTQ scene. This was Majlaton's third Grand Prix Top 8 sprinkled across the last half a decade or so. he and Reid joked as they looked over each other's deck lists prior to the start of play.

    "Did you see those Energy Flux in my sideboard?" laughed Majlaton.

    "Did you use them?"

    "No! I wish they were Tormod's Crypt," he said, echoing similar statements throughou the weekend about how hard it is to build a sideboard in this format with so many different archtypes being viable choices.

    Alex Majlaton

    Game 1

    Both players kept their hands and Duke's Hierarch was Mental Misstepped complete with the sound of a toilet flushing on the other side of the barrier for comic effect.

    Tarmogoyf came down for Duke and Majlaton played Silvergill Adept revealing Rejeery. Reid Duke looked at his hand, scripted out his plays in his head, and put his Wooded Foothills directly in the graveyard to fetch a dual land. Green Sun's Zenith for two got another Tarmogoyf and he attacked for three.

    Majlaton played his Rejeery and passed the turn. The score was 15 to 18 in Duke's favor. Head in hand he tried to figure out how best to play the board. The judge asked him to play faster and he finally played a fourth land and passed the turn.

    Majlaton played Silvergill Adept revealing Coralhelm Commander and untapping one of his Islands with the Rejeery's ability. Curesecatcher followed -- essentially for free. The Commander came down as well and suddenly Majlaton had summoned Neptune's army. He passed the turn with both players skirting the red zone. Reid fetched up Dryad Arbor at the end of the turn. He untapped, played a fifth land and attempted Natural Order sacrificing his Arbor. Majlaton played Daze, and when Duke paid, sacrificed his 'Catcher.

    Majlaton fully leveled his Commander and flew across for five damage. Duke had no action and simply played a land and said "go". Majlaton animated two Mutavaults and sent everything into the red zone. Duke had no blocks that did not leave him dead and they went to the sideboard -- double checking each other's lists to see what their opponent might be up to for game two.

    "You had better not bring in Energy Flux against me," deadpanned Duke.

    "It is my anti-Jitte technology."

    While they were side boarding they discussed upcoming travel plans.

    "Are you going to be in Kansas City?" aked Majlaton.

    "No, I am doing some sightseeing after Japan. I am going to visit Korea."

    "I still need to book a ticket for Japan. I wasn't going to go but then this happened," said the rating qualified Majlaton who suddenly found himself with a handful of Pro Points he wasn't expecting.


    Reid Duke

    Game 2

    The action started with a Tarmogoyf for Duke on the play while Majlaton had an Adept revealing Lord of Atlantis. Duke summoned Grim Lavamancer -- a card that has been doing plenty of work all weekend long. Majlaton paid two life to counter it but Duke had Red Elemental Blast. They counted up card types and Duke tried to --jokingly -- get an extra point thanks to the old wording on REB.

    "Interrupts also?"

    Majlaton cracked back for two and played Aether Vial and Cursecatcher post combat. Duke took another swing for two and deployed a second Tarmogoyf. Majlaton attacked Duke red sources with a pair of Wastelands. Reid Duke took advantage of the incoming extra cards to his graveyard to float some mana and Grim Lavamancer the Cursecatcher.

    Duke played Green Sun's Zenith for 2 (aka Tarmogoyf) and swung in for six total with 'Gofys. Majlaton played Merrow Rejeery -- with Vial on two -- but he was on his heels. Duke played a Ponder and the sorcery meant that the Maryland player had to block two of the 'Goyfs and fell to four. He put Lord of Atlantis into play but could not see a way to make it through Duke's next attack step.

    "The Goyf plan," sighed Majlaton who had agonized over his sideboard choices not knowing the exact configuration of Duke's post sideboard sixty. "This is impossible to sideboard."

    "Yeah, that is why I like this deck. You can just win with 'Goyfs."



    Game 3

    Aether Vial led things off for Majlaton and there was a Noble Hierarch for Duke. Silvergill Adept revealed Cursecatcher and Majlaton went a card deeper into his deck. Duke played Green Sun's Zenith for zero and Majlaton made a face but let Duke go get a Dryad Arbor. Duke also played another Hierarch. Majlaton Vial'd in Cursecatcher at the end of turn.

    He ticked his Vial up to two and cheated Silvergill into play for free. Majlatoin then went on the offensive with an attack from Mutavault, Catcher, and Silvergill. Duke fell to 14 and attempted to play Umezawa's Jitte but Majlaton felt that warranted Force of Will pitching Misstep.

    "How many cards do you have left?" asked Duke.

    "Two."

    Duke played a Taiga and made a Tarmogoyf. He then went to Chain LightningCursecatcher, which resolved. Majlaton looked at the two graveyards and shook his head at the 'Goyf. "That guy got big fast; land, artifact, instant, creature and sorcery."

    Duke then played Brainstorm and attempted another Tarmnogoyf.

    "One more card?" asked Majlaton as he stared at the the Force of Will in his hand and debated his options. he finally decided to Force of Will pitching Spell Pierce. Duke nodded and attacked with a doubly exalted Dryad Arbor. Majlaton fell to 15 -- Duke was at 14. Alex Vial'd out his last card -- Lord of Atlantis but drew and passed the turn to Duke.

    Duke broke a Misty Rainforest and searched but failed to find -- no doubt avoiding any Islands that could get walked all over. Once again he sent his 3/3 Arbor into the breach.

    Majlaton just passed the turn and Duke pressed in with the Tarmogoyf and it dropped Majlaton to 5. The Fish monger cracked back -- into a squad of two Noble Hierarchs and a Dryad Arbor -- with Lord of Atlantis an Adept. Duke blocked the Adept and tried to REB the Lord but Majlaton paid the alternate casting cost of Force of will -- actually tapping 3UU -- and countered the spell.

    Majlaton chumped with an Adept and on his turn considered his attacks as he moved his Mutavault up in line with his creatures and finally decided to attack with it and Adept. Duke chump blocked the Mutavault with a Hierarch and fell to 8.

    Duke went in the tank and finally decided to Pyroblast the Lord of Atlantis. Majlaton took advantage of that to Submerge the 'Goyf. He attacked with both and Duke fell to four and replayed the Goyf on his turn.

    Majlaton played Merrow Rejeery and passed the turn back to Duke who reluctantly played the Volcanic Island he had been holding while the Lord of Atlantis was around.

    "Man! I was waiting for you to play an Island forever."

    Duke played Brainstorm and Majlaton paid U for Misstep but Reid Misstepped back and Brainstorm resolved -- those were the last cards in each players hands. Duke had the top three cards of his library at his disposal and Majlaton was empty.

    Majlaton drew and Vialed in Silvergill Adept to draw a card. He animated his Mutavualt and attacked. Duke was at three and chumped with Noble Hierarch. Majlaton had to block on his turn and had only a Mutavault that could get in for two. He Wastelanded a Misty Rainforest and hoped for the best.

    Duke shrugged and said okay, putting his Rainforest in the bin. Majlaton extended his hand and congratulated Reid Duke on advancing to the semifinals.


     

  • Semifinals Round-Up

    by Nate Price
  • Reid Duke vs. Bryan Eleyet

    The first of these games was incredibly fast. Eleyet resolved a second-turn Show and Tell, using Force of Will to push it past a Daze. Show and Tell gave Eleyet his Hive Mind, and the Vendilion Clique Duke put into play didn't stop him from playing a summoner's pact in response to the Clique's ability. Duke wanted to resolve the ability all the same, just to get a peek at Eleyet's hand before conceding.

    This is what a second-turn kill looks like.

    In the second game, it looked like Eleyet had set up the perfect turn. He delayed going off by a turn so that he could shuffle his deck to try and draw another blue card for Force of Will, which he did. That gave him Force, Pact of Negation, and Mental Misstep to protect his Show and Tell. Unfortnately for him, Duke had two Forces, Pyroblast, and Spell Pierce to make sure that it didn't. Also unfortunately, in that counter war, Eleyet's Pact of Negation did resolve. When he couldn't pay for it on his upkeep, he learned how everyone he had beaten all weekend felt, dying to a Pact.


    Reid Duke

    The final game was unlike any I'd seen from Eleyet. He spent the first few turns simply sculpting his hand with Brainstorm and Ponder. Duke spent his building up mana. He was slowly beating with a Noble Hierarch for two. Eventuay, Eleyet cast Intuition, which Duke let resolve. Eleyet fetche out a trio of Show and Tells, which he promptly cast. He had a pair of Force of Wills to stop the two Pyroblasts played by Duke, and the show and tell resolved. Eleyet put his card face down, while Duke chose not to play anything. When the face down card was flipped over, Eleyet was the proud owner of a new Emrakul, the Aeons Torn.

    Duke was at 17, but he had two Misty Rainforests in play. He used a vendilion Clique to cycle away a Daze before casting Natural Order, fetching a Terastodon. The 'Donald ate three of Duke's lands, giving him many Elephants, Elephants he had to sacrifice to the annihilator trigger when Emrakul attacked on the next turn. To add injury to injury, Eleyet's draw for his turn was Hive Mind, which went well with the Summoner's Pact in his game to end it on the spot in the classic kill a dead man play.

    Reid Duke 1 - Bryan Eleyet 2

    Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa vs. James Rynkiewicz

    To start the first game, Rynkiewicz resolved a second-turn Stoneforge Mystic, fetching himself a Sword of Feast and Famine. On the other side of the table, PV was stalled on one land and ended up having to discard a Life from the Loam. He couldn't stop Rynkiewicz's Sword from hitting play, but he could Dismember it before it got equipped. Rynkiewicz tried to Counterspell, but PV had the Force of Will. A second Force stopped a Sylvan Library, but PV had nothing for the Dryad Arbor that Rynkiewicz fetched up and gave the Sword. After taking a hit, PV found a Wasteland to off the Arbor.

    Rynkiewicz had a Jace, the Mind Sculptor, which he immediately tasked with keeping lands off the top of PV's library, but PV could keep the top of his deck fresh by dredging Life from the Loam. Rynkiewicz made a Tarmogoyf to pick up the Sword, but PV had a Pernicious Deed to threaten to clear the board. He only had one mana remaining, though, which gave Rynkiewicz the window he needed to get a Qasali Pridemage to kill it before it could kill any of his toys. He also upped the ante with a Knight of the Reliquary that was impressively large.

    Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa

    Rynkiewicz kept himself busy over the next couple of turns making sure that PV didn't disrupt his plans, so the Knight never got equipped, but he didn't need it. It only took two swings from the massive Knight to end PV. On the second attack, PV fired up a Mishra's Factory to block, but Rynkiewicz had a Pridemage to blow it up. When he powered up the second, tapping out, Rynkiewicz had the Swords to Plowshares to keep the path clear.

    In the next game, Rynkiewicz got a nice start with a Noble Hierarch and a Sylvan Library. He managed to keep his library around by Spell Piercing a Maelstrom Pulse PV leveled at it. PV's first Pernicious Deed met a Qasali Pridemage before he could untap, and his second met another. The whole time, Thrun, the Last Troll, was beating down with a Sword of Feast and Famine, effectively giving Rynkiewicz double mana. The advantage, along with his inability to kill any of Rynkiewicz's permanents, was more than PV could handle.

    Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa 0 – James Rynkiewicz 2


     

  • Finals – James Rynkiewicz (NoFow) vs. Bryan Eleyet (Hive Mind)

    by Brian David-Marshall
  • James Rynkiewicz is something of a Legacy ringer. He plays regularly in the Binghamton area at the Jupiter Games Legacy Northeast Championship Series where he has all but locked up that event's Player of the Year title and will be playing in their Invitational in just two weekends from now.

    "NoFow?" asked Bryan Eleyet as the two finalists looked over each other's lists.

    "No Force of Will," laughed Rynkiewicz who demonstrated true ringer skills by subsequently putting the whammy on his opponent. "Congratulations on winning the Grand Prix."

    Neither player seemed to stressed about the match and talked about the quirks of their respective lists.

    "No Slaughter Pact?" asked Rynkiewicz, no doubt thinking of the list that Bryan's friend had been crushing the MTGO Daily events with. As it turns out they replaced Slaughter Pact with Mental Misstep but since New Phyrexia was only just coming out online and the list there did not reflect the most recent changes.

    "So where are you from?" asked Rynkiewicz.

    "Spokane, Washington."

    "So you go to school here?"

    "Nope."

    "You flew here?"

    "Yup."

    "Just for this?"

    One thing was clear, whatever the outcome of this match this Legacy Grand Prix was not going to be won by a veteran Pro Player like the previous six events. Welcome to the Pro Tour boys!



    Game 1

    Neither player mulliganed and Eleyet led off with an Island. He followed up with City of Traitors into Grim Monolith and played Hive Mind on turn three -- Rynkiewicz had played Brainstorm and Birds of Paradise on his second turn -- and when it resolved played Pact of the Titan compelling Rynkiewiez to put a copy he could not afford to pay for on the stack as well.

    "Daze?" asked the Binghmanton player, returning a land to his hand.

    Eleyet nodded and played his copy of Daze targeting the orginal Daze.

    "I had to see if you would do it," Rynkiewicz grinned sheepishly. "Game two."

    Game 2

    Bryan took out three copies of Emrakul and brought in three more counters from his sideboard. Rynkiewicz could not get enough cards out of his deck as he brough in Gaddock Teeg, Dispel, Mental Misstep, 2 Krosan Grip, and 3 Spell Pierce. He briefly sided in Syklvan Safekkeper than took it out when he remembered that he was not playing Slaughter Pact.

    Eleyet sent his six card hand back and while they were shuffling Rynkiewicz quizzed his opponent about the deck:

    "You deck can't win on turn one?"

    It hasn't happened yet but I am not saying it can't happen."

    "My friend won on turn one with High Tide in testing. He was playing against Hypergeneisis and he put all his lands into play and went off."

    "That doesn't count."

    With his six card hand sifficient they were underway and James used Green Sun's Zenith to ramp into Dryad Arbor. Bryan's third turn Ancient Tomb into Grim Monolith was met with Spell Pierce.

    He played a fetch land to Ponder but James broke his own fetch land in response and cast Vendillion Clkique. He saw a hand with Ponder, Hive Mind, Pact of Negation, and two lands. "I am going to write this down and take Hive Mind."

    Eleyet replaced it with Mental Misstep which he used to protect his Ponder from James's Misstep. He didn't see anything he liked and shuffled them back in for a fresh rip off the top. James dug into his deck with Brainstorm and then played Green Sun's Zenith for two to get the troublesome Mr. Teeg.

    Bryan was stymied and passed the turn only to have James play the green Jace -- Sylvan Library. If there was ever a deck you just use all your life drawing cards this was the one to do it against. James paid four and drew an extra card. He attacked with everyone and Eleyet played Pact of the Titan -- threatening to make a creature that could block Gaddock Teeg. It resolved. Ultimately he blocked Teeg and fell to three. James played Wasteland and took out Bryan's Ancient Tomb. He went and got Volcanic Island at the end of the turn and tapped it, one Island, and his Monolith to pay for the Titan but he could not find an answer to the flier.



    Game 3

    "There was one game in testing against Merfolk where I actually won with beatdown from my token," laughed Bryan as they discussed whether or not the Titan token went away at the end of the turn it was played -- it doesn't.

    "If I win this I am going to be the first deck to win a Legacy GP without Force of Will," laughed Rynkiewicz who was promptly told about Jon Sonne winning with Patron of the Akki at the first Legacy GP.

    "I did not even know there were Legacy GPs before the Flash Hulk one. What were the finals Pox on Pox?" he joked. "I just have to win so Drew Levin gets upset. He walked up to me and told me he was going to write an article bashing my deck."

    "C'mon stone cold nuts," cheered James as he drew his opening seven. "One time! Draw Force of Will!"

    "Ummm..." said table judge Jared Sylva to remind them that he was there and had ther actual deck lists.

    "I am going to lose anyway," said James, reinforcing the whammy he had put in place at the beginning of the match. Bryan had no response and let the whammy resolve. Not even an Misdirection. "I wish I had one more sideboard card to bring in so I could get rid on one card against you.

    James drew the Maze of Ith he was referring to and laughingly showed it to everyone. "Maybe I can Maze your Emrakul."

    Bryan led off the rubber game with Ponder and followed up with an Ancient Tomb that was promptly Wastelanded by James. Bryan dug with Brainstorm and James crossed his fingers. "C'mon one land one time."

    Bryan played another Island and Pondered into Spell Pierce. He Brainstormed in repsonse. James needed a moment.

    "Lemme think about this one. A thousand dollar decision," before waving his opponent along. "Brainstorm is fine."

    Eleyet debated about what to put back and James sighed. "So your hand is actually insane. It is the opposite.'

    James threw his hands up and tapped out to play Sylvan Library. "Am I dead?"

    Bryan tried a Grim Monolith and James played Daze picking up one of his two lands. Eleyet cracked his fetch and paid. James said the words every old school player loves to hear when there is a Sylvan Libray on the board.

    "I will take eight," he said as he kept all three cards he drew with the Library. He fell to 11. Bryan had no gas and was waiting for some new cards to bob to the surface of his deck. James only drew one the next time and played Karakas. He played Vendilion Clique you after Bryan drew for his turn. He saw 2 Pact of Titan, Pact of Negation, Summoner's Pact, Misdirection, and Ancient Tomb.

    He did not choose anything and Bryan passed the turn without playing Ancient Tomb for fear of exposing it to Wasteland.

    James paid another four life and found himself a Brainstorm and put two cards back down on top of his deck.

    "Is one of those Maze of Ith?" laughed Eleyet. Rynkiewicz Krosan Gripped the Grim Monolith and had Mental Misstep for Eleyet's Ponder. James was at four from his Sylvan Library and had to respect the potential of a Pact of the Titan stealing the game from him. He played Jace and fate sealed, leaving a card on top of Bryan's deck.

    James turned to the judge and asked to check whether or not the token made by the red pact of had haste. While they pulled up the Oracle text James gave a confident thumbs up to his friends along the rail.

    Bryan had three Islands and no way to make red so James finally attacked with his Clique. Bryan fell to 12. He played Ancient Tomb but a Green Sun's Zenith for Teeg pretty much sealed the game with a Knight of the Reliquary as the icing.

    There was a huge burst of applause from the all the upstate New Yorkers along the rail as Bryan Eleyet extended his hand to congratulate James Rynkiewicz on becoming the Grand Prix Providence Champion!

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