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Some Near Misses

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If there's one thing players love to share, it's a bad beat story. Here are some of this weekend's most shocking cases of victory souring into defeat.

Final Fantasy

Gary Wise was playing against Tony Rungee who seemed to be playing some sort of Tinker variant. He had a Myr Incubator in play and six mana available and had the option of Tinkering for Gilded Lotus then activating on his opponent's turn, activating immediately, or Tinkering for Tangle Wire to lock his opponent up (but also giving him an extra turn). In the end he thought to himself, "What could he possibly do anyway?" and went for the Gilded Lotus. His opponent then proceeded to Cunning Wish for Final Fortune on end step, play an Isochron Scepter imprinting the Final Fortune, and then Tinker for Platinum Angel. Infinite turns, anyone?

Playing First Isn't Always Enough

Neil Reeves was playing first with his Oath deck against Kazushi Kawamura's seemingly typical Goblins and pulled up the god hand of Island, Forest, Chrome Mox, two Fire/Ice, Oath of Druids, and Isochron Scepter. On his first turn he played out a land, imprinted the Mox, and cast a Scepter with Fire/Ice. He lost this game.

How? Kawamura's first turn was Ancient Tomb, Chrome Mox, Seething Song, Goblin Recruiter, Skirk Prospector, sac both goblins, Goblin Charbelcher. Neil had one chance to draw one of his three outs, didn't, and immediately lost when his opponent had a second Ancient Tomb to pay the activation cost despite being hit by Ice.

Turn Two Mindslaver Isn't Either

Against Osamu Fujita, Kai Budde had a perfect Tinker hand that resulted in City of Traitors, Grim Monolith and Metalworker in play on turn one. He had the Tinker in his hand and enough artifacts to be able to fetch and activate a Mindslaver on his second turn. No matter. Osamu played a Chrome Mox and Tinkered it away for a Gilded Lotus, then Twiddled it twice to allow a Mind's Desire, which gave him enough cards and mana for a second Mind's Desire, this time for eight. With Tendrils of Agony available to be cast for free, Kai had no choice but to scoop before even untapping for a second turn.

Eighteen on Turn One

Osamu Fujita, playing Twiddle Desire, had an amazing first turn where he played Ancient Tomb, then Chrome Mox, then Tinker into Gilded Lotus, followed by a Twiddle and Diminishing Returns. Eventually he was in a position to cast Tendrils of Agony, but only eight spells had been cast in the turn. So he cast it for eighteen, setting the life totals at thirty-eight to two.

The game wound on, with his opponent eventually casting a Crumbling Sanctuary. A few turns later a Mindslaver was resolved and activated, seeing a hand with a number of Twiddle effects. The opponent started tapping the Ancient Tomb for mana, then Twiddling it and tapping it again, as the best way to use up all the Twiddles. The net result of all this? Fujita's only other Tendrils was milled into the graveyard, and he was forced to concede the game.

Raw Dogging the Belcher

Osyp Lebedowicz was playing against a Goblin deck and had just sacrificed a Myr Incubator for over twenty 1/1s. His opponent had no outs except for randomly activating his Goblin Charbelcher and hoping, since he hadn't stacked his deck in any way. Spell after spell flipped off the top of the deck, and the net result was that Osyp took a full twenty-two damage and lost the game. What a beating.

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