gpant13

Dickmann Unleashes Twins in Antwerp!

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1,600 players followed the call to Antwerp, making the Belgian Grand Prix one of the largest Modern tournaments of all time. We saw a very diverse field. Some players ran new decks like Raphael Levy and his Merfolk build, while others brought a different and often improved version of an existing archetype, e.g. Martin Juza and Stanislav Cifka who showed up with a WR Splinter Twin deck.

While the pros set the bar very high, many players followed their lead, putting their trust into their own takes on the established archetypes. One member of this particular group was 23-year-old Patrick Dickmann, the twin brother of Fabian Dickmann who finished in second place at Grand Prix Bochum last year.

At first it didn't look like Patrick would be able to one-up his brother; without byes, he had to recover from a crucial two losses in the first four rounds of competition. Despite being on the bubble from round five on, Dickmann never dropped another match all weekend, climbing the ladder with his Splinter Twin deck that also sported a number of burn elements.

For a very long time, it seemed like Living End would be the defining deck of the weekend, securing two spots in a Top 8 that also featured Tron, Infect, Affinity and Jund. Fabrizio Anteri and his Tron deck eliminated one of the Living End players, while Dickmann defeated the other in the semis. The final, then, was over in a hurry, with Dickmann assembling his combos before Anteri found a way to unleash the full power of Karn Liberated, making Dickmann your Grand Prix Antwerp Champion!




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Anteri, Fabrizio   Anteri, Fabrizio, 2-0        
8 Bonneau, Alexandre   Anteri, Fabrizio, 2-0
       
4 Sotiriadi, Nazar   Sotiriadi, Nazar, 2-1   Dickmann, Patrick, 2-0
5 Rúnarsson, Herman    
       
2 Björklund, Rasmus   Björklund, Rasmus, 2-0
7 Fior, Daniel   Dickmann, Patrick, 2-1
       
3 Hendriks, Thomas   Dickmann, Patrick, 2-0
6 Dickmann, Patrick    









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  Streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Antwerp provided by Matej Zatlkaj, Marijn Lybaert, Rich Hagon, and Steven Leeming at twitch.tv/magic.


EVENT COVERAGE INFORMATION
 1.  Patrick Dickmann $3,500
 2.  Fabrizio Anteri $2,300
 3.  Sotiriadi, Nazar $1,500
 4.  Björklund, Rasmus $1,500
 5.  Daniel Fior $1,000
 6.  Thomas Hendriks $1,000
 7.  Hermann Rúnarsson $1,000
 8.  Alexandre Bonneau $1,000
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  • Top 16 Decklists

    by Oliver Gehrmann

  • Till Riffert - 9th place - Jund
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern



    Gabriel Maka - 11th place - Affinity
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern



    Joel Calafell - 13th place - Living End
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern


    Frank Carsten - 14th place - Affinity
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern






     

  • Top 8 Decklists

    by Tobi Henke & Oliver Gehrmann

  • Fabrizio Anteri - Tron
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern


    Alexandre Bonneau - Living End
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern



    Hermann Rúnarsson a- Infect
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern


    Thomas Hendriks - Splinter Twin
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern



    Daniel Fior - Affinity
    Grand Prix Antwerp 2013 – Modern





     

  • Top 8 Profiles

    by Oliver Gehrmann


  • Fabrizio Anteri

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
    Occupation: Half-time employed, half-time boyfriend, half-time Magic player. Yes, three halfs!


    Previous accomplishments:
    Top 8 GP London 2013. I haven't missed a day 2 in individual Grand Prix.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    RG Tron. It's a very solid deck; you have around 2 good match-ups for every bad one!

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I'm somewhat scared about Living End, so I should consider adding more sideboard cards against it.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Karn Liberated. Honorable mention to Dismember, though.




    Daniel Fior

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela, but I'm currently living in Sweden
    Occupation: Masters Student


    Previous accomplishments:
    Top 8 GP Mexico City 05Top 8 GP Sao Paulo 2012Top 16 GP Turin 2012Top 32 World Magic Championship 2013

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    I went with Affinity. It's the deck I'm most familiar with and I feel more comfortable playing it than any of the other decks.

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would try to squeeze in some Relic of Progenitus to have a fighting chance against Living End.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Not Thoughtcast!




    Thomas Hendriks

    Age: 21
    Hometown: Leiden, The Netherlands
    Occupation: Student


    Previous accomplishments:
    I played for the Dutch team at Worlds, but it didn't go so well. This went a bit better.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Splinter Twin, because the deck was easy to borrow. Boggles was my first choice, but Leyline of Sanctity is hard to find.

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would not play Izzet Charm because it's horrible. I would play Swan Song if I knew what the card did.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Deceiver Exarch, because Pestermite only dies every time right after I play it...




    Nazar Sotiriadi

    Age: 26
    Hometown: Moscow, Russia
    Occupation: CTO of an Ecology Services Company


    Previous accomplishments:
    None noteworthy.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Jund with no 4CMC in the main deck. I think it's very consistent and it has a shot against virtually any deck in the format.

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    Probably none, the deck is consistent as it is.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Lightning Bolt.




    Hermann Rúnarsson

    Age: 31
    Hometown: Lund, Sweden
    Occupation: Student


    Previous accomplishments:
    None that I feel like mentioning here.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Bug Infect. It was cheap to build and I could borrow the fetch lands.

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would tidy up the sideboard and drop a Groundswell for another Might of Old Krosa.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    It tended to be Apostle's Blessing or Vines of Vastwood this weekend.




    Patrick Dickmann

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Cologne, Germany
    Occupation: Student


    Previous accomplishments:
    25th at GP Bochum25th at Pro Tour Nagoya

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    TempoTwin, a deck I've been playing for about a year now. It fits my playstyle very well and as a deck designer, I absolutely wanted to show off!

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    The decklist is the result of more than 1000 games. I'm really happy with the current version; although I didn't have too many chances to use Molten Rain, I'm still sold on it.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Snapcaster Mage.




    Carl Gustaf "Rasmus" Björklund

    Age: 21
    Hometown: Lund, Sweden
    Occupation: Personal Assistant


    Previous accomplishments:
    Finalist at GP RiminiTop 16 at GP Warsaw

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Living End. It's a fun deck and good in this particular metagame. People still don't know how to play against it.

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I'd cut a Valley Rannet for a Pale Recluse. No other changes.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Living End, duh...




    Alexandre Bonneau

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Clermont-Ferrand, France
    Occupation: Tourist


    Previous accomplishments:
    Nothing but a FNM title or maybe even 2, I'm not so sure of that...

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Living End, because of the ban of Bloodbraid Elf. I still want to cascade in a Jund deck...

    What changes would you apply to your deck and why would you make them?
    I want to change my whole deck after this GP since people will finally have Living End on the radar.

    What is the most important card in your deck?
    Living End except when I draw all copies of it.






     

  • Quarterfinals Round-Up

    by Tobi Henke

  • In the first match to finish, Hermann Rúnarsson, playing Infect, met Nazar Sotiriadi, playing Jund. They split the first two games: once Sotiriadi's removal and Liliana of the Veil were enough, once Inkmoth Nexus provided too much staying power. In the third game Sotiriadi Thoughtseized Abrupt Decay out of Rúnarsson's hand, then blanked all of his pumpspells with Spellskite, and finally cleared the board with Jund Charm. Still, Rúnarsson was quite happy to even have come so far. Said Rúnarsson, "Making Top 8 of a Modern Grand Prix with Infect—I really didn't expect that!"


    Hermann Rúnarsson 1-2 Nazar Sotiriadi

    In the next quarterfinal Fabrizio Anteri and his Urzatron deck met Alexandre Bonneau on Living End. Twice Anteri had Urzatron by turn three and each time he cast Karn Liberated and immediately attacked Bonneau's lands. Despite Bonneau's best efforts—which included keeping two Verdant Catacombs around for a while as well as Beast Withining—he lost two straight games without the crucial number of three lands on the battlefield.


    Alexandre Bonneau 0-2 Fabrizio Anteri

    Meanwhile, Daniel Fior and his Affinity deck were paired against Rasmus Björklund, running the other Living End deck in the Top 8. In the first game, two Arcbound Ravagers, through their ability to sacrifice all artifact creatures at will, provided an interesting potential foil for Living End. However, Fior's draw wasn't quite fast enough, allowing Björklund to stock his graveyard well—with Deadshot Minotaur and Jungle Weaver offering protection against fliers and Fulminator Mage against Blinkmoth Nexus—before a cascade for Living End did seal the deal after all. For the second game, Björklund had access to a number of powerful sideboard options but didn't even need any. A somewhat slower draw by Fior without Arcbound Ravager meant that a simple Living End, cascaded on turn three, sufficed to take the match.


    Daniel Fior 0-2 Rasmus Björklund

    The fourth quarterfinal saw Splinter Twin expert Patrick Dickmann playing the mirror match against Thomas Hendriks. Between Lightning Bolts, Izzet Charms, and counterspells it is extremely difficult for a player to piece together his combo here, and the match-up rewards a calm playing style. Hendriks blinked first, failed with his combo attempt, and Dickmann succeeded with his own on the backswing. The second game was somewhat marred by mana trouble for Hendriks. He was stuck on three lands until about turn seven, while Dickmann hadn't missed a land-drop and was already able to make good use of Desolate Lighthouse; his mana davantage also meant that his Cryptic Commands resolved and that he had a better range of options with his Snapcaster Mages. While Hendriks's spell advantage allowed him to bring Dickmann down to 4—most of the damage being done by his own Dismembers and lands, however—in the end, Dickmann clinched victory through combat damage. "Your deck is much better prepared for the mirror match," Hendriks said, congratulating Dickmann on his win, "and so are you."


    Thomas Hendriks 0-2 Patrick Dickmann




     

  • Semifinals - Patrick Dickmann vs. Rasmus Björklund

    by Oliver Gehrmann

  • For a very long time this weekend, Rasmus Björklund and his Living End deck have been leading the field. He now has to go up against Germany's Patrick Dickmann who brought his own take on the Splinter Twin archetype to the table. You can read more about it in this article.


    The match-up favored Dickmann, but could Björklund beat the odds?

    The first game, Dickmann went first, dishing out damage with Grim Lavamancer and Deceiver Exarch while Björklund cycled through his deck for several turns, waiting for it to provide him with a second land.


    Björklund's Graveyard was loaded!

    "Just in time!", Björklund announced, when his deck finally provided him with a second land. Dickmann, meanwhile, left him with only 4 life, relentlessly attacking with his creatures.

    Valley Rannet found Björklund a Forest, but it wasn't enough. He played the land on his following turn, cast Demonic Dread, but Dickmann flashed a Remand in his hand, causing Björklund to access his sideboard.

    Game 2 - Dickmann leading 1:0

    Björklund quickly decided to take a mulligan while Dickmann was happy with the opening 7 his deck provided him with. Once again, Dickmann started bringing the beatdown while Björklund went Cycling. That's when Dickmann decided to take a Peek.


    These are the cards that Dickmann saw.

    With only a Grim Lavamancer in play, Dickmann couldn't put Björklund on a big enough clock it seemed. The Swede went down to 14 life when he cast Violent Outburst, finding a Living End just as expected. Dickmann, however, used a fetch land and which allowed him to play Remand with the intention of countering Living End!

    That wasn't meant to happen, with a Ricochet Trap from Björklund redirecting the target of Remand, making sure that things unfolded in the manner the Swede wanted.


    Once again, Living End had turned a game upside down!

    A Violent Outburst made sure he would get even more damage in on his following turn and when Dickmann didn't find an answer right away, we knew that this match would go to a third game.

    Game 3 - Score: 1:1

    Björklund went down to 6 cards in his starting hand in the second game, while Dickmann kept for the third time in a row.


    Patrick Dickmann kept for the third time in a row!

    The first few turns, Dickmann used several fetch lands and dual lands together with 2 copies of Serum Visions to flatten out his draws. He went down to 13 life in the process, but it seemed like he was on to something.

    A Relic of Progenitus then threatened Björklund who could no longer assemble his combo unharmed. The Swede went cycling regardless with Deadshot Minotaur and Monstrous Carabid, while Dickmann cast Vendilion Clique, seeing these cards:


    Dickmann now knew what Björklund was holding on to!

    Björklund tried to fight back with Beast Within and Demonic Dread, but Dickmann had exactly what he needed with Izzet Charm and Remand to deal with these threats.

    Björklund was now forced to play Living End from his hand, while Dickmann continued to exile cards. When he cast Deceiver Exarch and Splinter Twin and Björklund couldn't find an answer despite him Cycling through his deck, he extended the hand and wished his opponent all the best for the finals.


    Splinter Twin secured Dickmann's spot in the finals!



     

  • Finals - Patrick Dickmann vs. Fabrizio Anteri

    by Oliver Gehrmann

  • After 15 rounds of Swiss and another 2 rounds in the knock out portion of today's event, we've made it to just two players remaining in competition: Fabrizio Anteri, who was the top-seated player after the Swiss Rounds, and who ended up on third place at a Grand Prix before. No matter how the final would play out, he improved his past record.


    Fabrizio Anteri improved his past record no matter how the final would turn out!

    Patrick Dickmann on the other hand has collected a lot of experience online, putting the fear in his opponents as "Ophelia", one of the best known Splinter Twin players online. His own take on the archetype has served him well so far this weekend and according to his friends, the finals will also be "easy money", since the match-up dramatically favors the German. As if we needed any proof for that statement, this is how the first game unfolded:

    Anteri started assembling his mana base with an Expedition Map on his early turns, allowing him to cast a Chromatic Sphere and Wurmcoil Engine on his third turn already! Dickmann, meanwhile, watched seemingly stunned, not performing any actions.


    Fabrizio Anteri went all-in on his early turns!

    Karn Liberated followed on Anteri's turn 4, going up to 10 counters, but Dickmann had Pestermite for it. Yet another Pestermite tapped Chromatic Sphere and on his following turn, Dickmann unleashed the Splinter Twin combo and that was that.

    Game 2 - Dickmann leading 1:0

    "This Tron guy in the finals of #gpantwerp just killed himself..."

    - Brian Kibler on Twitter

    "Brian Kibler says hi", I told Fabrizio Anteri, who was happy to hear that the Hall of Famer was watching the stream. He then tried to shake it off, accessing his sideboard and introducing a couple of fresh cards for the second game.


    Patrick Dickmann had all the momentum and all he needed now was a second win!

    After the dust had settled, Anteri once again assembled his Urza lands while Dickmann played a less passive role, using some fetch lands to solve his own mana problems and Serum Visions to set up his following draws.


    The third time really WAS the charm for Karn Liberated!

    Over the course of the following turns, Anteri cast Karn Liberated three times! The first time, Dickmann used Remand; the second time, a Snapcaster Mage allowed Dickmann to repeat that particular play and the third time, Karn finally stuck. In between, Dickmann kept buying himself time with Molten Rain (he played it again courtesy of another Snapcaster Mage), temporarily shutting down the Urza land engine.


    The German threw his cards on the table, knowing that he had just won a Grand Prix!

    So the Planeswalker hit play, costing Dickmann a Splinter Twin. He didn't mind too much, casting both Pestermite and Deceiver Exarch at the end of his opponent's turn. The following turn, he threw a Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker on the table to wrap things up and become a Grand Prix Champion!

    Patrick Dickmann wins Grand Prix Antwerp!




     

  • Top 5 Cards of Grand Prix Antwerp 2013

    by Tobi Henke

  • These were the cards that shaped the tournament, that sparked discussions and were the most debated, the cards that won games and matches and turned Grand Prix Antwerp into an event to remember ...




    5. Village Bell-Ringer

    The first big story came early in the weekend when Martin Jůza was frantically searching the hall, all the vendors' stock, and the whole Twitterverse for Village Bell-Ringer. He even bought several Innistrad packs looking for the unimposing common card. He and Stanislav Cifka both ran an innovative red-white Splinter Twin deck. The idea was amazing, the results were somewhat mixed: while Jůza failed to make Day Two, Cifka managed to end up in avery respectable 25th place.





    4. Anger of the Gods

    One of the most used cards from Magic's latest release didn't find its way into a lot of main decks, but it did enter an insane amounts of sideboards and turned quite a few match-ups around. Some UWR players used it, as did some Splinter Twin pilots. It found a home in Jund sideboards and was especially useful for Living End players who, because of their need to cascade into Living End, can't use any spell which costs less than three mana.





    3. Living End

    Apropos ... The Living End deck was out in full force this weekend. The last two undefeated players in the the tournament after ten rounds, Rasmus Björklund and Alexandre Bonneau, were both playing the deck, and both converted their early lead into a Top 8 berth as well. And the surprising resurgence of the archetype didn't come on the back of great numbers; in Day Two only six players were running the deck, making two Top 8 appearances an all the more astonishing feat.





    2. Karn Liberated

    The best turn-three play in the format? Karn Liberated probably is exactly that, provided you can manage to assemble the infamous trio of Urza's Tower, Urza's Power Plant, and Urza's Mine. Fabrizio Anteri was the best at playing this particular subgame and was rewarded with a second-place finish here. And he may have even won the final if he had cast the Planeswalker again on turn three or attacked his opponent's lands instead of his hand with it.





    1. Splinter Twin

    In the end, however, Splinter Twin took the title. In the hands of Patrick Dickmann who had tested and tuned the deck to perfection, it proved a lethal weapon. While Dickmann stressed the importance of his particular version's ability to win without ever combining Splinter Twin/Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker with either Deceiver Exarch or Pestermite, in the end it was the exactly the sheer power of the game-ending two-card combination that carried him to victory.






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