gpbil13

Manders is Modern Man of the Moment

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Congratulations to Mitchell Manders, the winner of Grand Prix Bilbao 2013!

Mitchell Manders from the Netherlands had previously taken a bit of a break from Magic. Before this weekend his biggest success had been a trip to New York for the Junior Super Series, many years ago. Now qualified for Pro Tour Dragon's Maze with his win in Bilbao, is flying high, having defeated Lukas Jaklovsky's Jund deck in a tight three game set with the red white and blue flash deck that he had first encountered on Magic Online.

Coming into the tournament, some felt that the Modern format is all about Jund, but here in Spain we've encountered far more than that. We've seen combo in Scapeshift and Storm. We've seen aggro in zoo and robots, and we've seen control in Gifts Ungiven and the UWR Flash deck that took Mitchell Manders all the way to the top. This is the last Modern event before Gatecrash becomes legal, and Modern appears strong and healthy, ready for the influx of new guild cards with the release of the new set.

As the sun sets on the tournament in Bilbao, we find ourselves looking forward to both the Gatecrash prerelease, and onward to our next event Grand Prix London, where we will be bringing you a first look at Gatecrash limited before Pro Tour Gatecrash in Montreal Canada.

Good night from all of us here in Spain, and congratulations again to Mitchell Manders, our Grand Prix Bilbao 2013 Champion!




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Lukas Jaklovsky   Lukas Jaklovsky, 2-0        
8 Francisco Camacho   Lukas Jaklovsky, 2-0,
       
4 Vasco Bonifacio   Vasco Bonifacio, 2-0   Mitchell Manders, 2-1
5 Lorenzo Calzolari    
       
2 Louis Deltour   Louis Deltour, 2-0
7 Mathieu Deloly   Mitchell Manders, 2-0
       
3 Mitchell Manders   Mitchell Manders, 2-0
6 Martin Scheinin    


  Streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Bilbao provided Matej Zatklaj, Simon Görtzen, Rich Hagon, and Steven Leeming at twitch.tv/magicprotour.







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EVENT COVERAGE TWITTER

INFORMATION
 1.  Mitchell Manders $3,500
 2.  Lukas Jaklovsky $2,300
 3.  Louis Deltour $1,500
 4.  Vasco Bonifacio $1,500
 5.  Lorenzo Calzolari $1,000
 6.  Martin Scheinin $1,000
 7.  Mathieu Deloly $1,000
 8.  Francisco Camacho $1,000
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  • Top 16 – Decklists

    by Event Coverage Staff











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  • Top 8 – Decklists

    by Event Coverage Staff











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  • Top 8 – Players

    by Event Coverage Staff


  • Lukas Jaklovsky

    Age: 22
    Hometown: Prague, Czech Republic
    Occupation: Student


    Guild:
    Dimir

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    I probably played the worst Magic of my life this weekend and still managed to make Top 8.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Jund. I didn't find a reason to play anything else.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?

    Probably nothing, the deck was sweet.




    Louis-Samuel Deltour

    Age: 20
    Hometown: Paris, France
    Occupation: Journalism student


    Guild:
    Dimir

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    One-and-a-half Grand Prix Top 8s (London 2011, fifth at Team Grand Prix San Jose 2012). Got the sponsor's exemption for Pro Tour Gatecrash!

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Frenshift. Fellow exemptee Pierre Dagen gave me the list a week ago. It was really well positioned and sweet to play, so I went for it.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    Don't play it! It was a metagame call. It loses really easily to prepared opponents. Otherwise, try to sneak in an Overgrown Tomb somewhere.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    Urban Evolution is sweeeet!




    Mitchell Manders

    Age: 22
    Hometown: Rotterdam, the Netherlands
    Occupation: Warehouse/part-time at magicunited.nl


    Guild:
    I guess Boros...

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    JSS champion, third at Nationals in 2012.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    UWR. Saw it grinding on Magic Online. Picked it up, tweaked it a little, and was ready for combat.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would test some Restoration Angels over the Aven Mindcensor, or maybe a second Thundermaw Hellkite.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    I haven't seen much, but I'm a really big fan of Boros Charm already.




    Vasco Bonifacio

    Age: 31
    Hometown: Castelo Branco, Portugal
    Occupation: IT consultant


    Guild:
    Azorius

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    None whatsoever.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    I played Jund because it's the strongest deck in the format. I chose Huntemaster of the Fells over Lingering Souls as a personal preference. Both are OK. Bituminous Blast is a spicy old-school card from Reid Duke.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would play another Burst Lightning instead of the Dismember.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    Boros Charm, but I haven't seen many of them.




    Lorenzo Calzolari

    Age: 38
    Hometown: Bologna, Italy
    Occupation: Project manager/software engineer


    Guild:
    Simic

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Won several Prereleases, made Top 9 at a PTQ, Top 66 at a GP, and earned a Pro Point in Rimini during the Lorwyn era.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Scapeshift, because I think the match-up against Jund is good, and Modern Grand Prix are full of Jund decks.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    I swapped a Cascade Bluffs for an Island at the last minute. I wouldn't change anything else. Thanks to the crew guy who gave it tome because it brought me good luck.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    Domri Rade. I love planeswalkers.




    Martin Scheinin

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Madrid, Spain
    Occupation: School teacher


    Guild:
    Dr. Izzet!

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Won a Grand Prix, played in a bunch of Pro Tours. Won against David Ortiz at both Tienda Itaca and Omega Center Soria!

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    GiftsFlare, because I can't resist playing Gifts Ungiven.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?

    Cut one Jace, Architect of Thought, one Terastodon, and one Golgari Charm; add stuff against combo decks!




    Mathieu Deloly

    Age: 27
    Hometown: Paris, France
    Occupation: Project manager in engineering


    Guild:
    Selesnya, love tokens!

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Won all my feature matches so far.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Naya Pod, because it's good against Jund and it kills with tokens!

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    I would cut one maindeck Kitchen Finks to add a second Deceiver Exarch.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    Enter the Infinite! Drawing all of your deck... a dream coming true!




    Francisco Javier Camacho Vargas

    Age: 21
    Hometown: Granada, Spain
    Occupation: Student, Magic stream page mindtrick.tv co-founder


    Guild:
    Azorius

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Two Pro Tour appearances.

    What deck did you play and why did you choose it?
    Kiki-Pod, because Patxi Sanchez and Toni Ramis told me to play it.

    What changes would you make to your deck and why would you make them?
    None.

    What's your favorite Gatecrash preview card?

    Domri Rade.




     

  • Sunday, 9:07 p.m. – Quarterfinals roundup

    by Tim Willoughby

  • Lukas Jaklovsky vs. Francisco Camacho

    Game one proved a grindy one, with Camacho's Kiki-Pod deck not really able to get off its combo for a long while in the face of a persistent discard attack from Liliana of the Veil from Jaklovsky. He was able to start using Kiki-Jiki for pure value, with the likes of Murderous Redcap, but Jund's ability to remove creatures meant that this plan was only going to work for so long. While Camacho was able to deal with Liliana in the end, the damage had already been done to his hand, and Jund was able to power through to take game one.

    Lukas Jaklovsky vs. Francisco Camacho

    It looked like Camacho had had an ideal start for game two with a turn two Birthing Pod on the play, but a turn two Torpor Orb from Jaklovsky caused the main plan to need to go on pause momentarily, to deal with the powerful sideboard card. Camacho looked to be thinking to simply attack around it, using his Birthing Pod to get some hefty creatures into play, with which to get ahead in the game by simply attacking. A pair of copies of Restoration Angel soon ruled the skies, and had Jaklovsky low on life in spite of Camacho not really being able to do any kind of fancy combo activity.

    As had been seen in countless games throughout the tournament, Olvia Voldaren came to the rescue for Jaklovsky. The turning point in the game, she was soon joined by Bloodbraid Elf, and a Grafdigger's Cage shut down Birthing Pod to make it unlikely that the legendary vampire would be trumped by Camacho. First Olivia shot down the smaller creatures, then it started to go after the angels. In short order, Lukas had turned around the game, and with it, won his quarterfinals match.

    Lukas Jaklovsky wins 2-0

    Lorenz Calzolari vs. Vasco Bonifacio

    Vasco Bonifacio of Portugal's Jund deck did what Jun has a tendency to do against Lorenz Calzolari. The Italian managed to keep a Dark Confidant off the board, but soon had his hand attacked by discard from the Jund deck, and could not put together the combo pieces he needed to Scapeshift his way out of trouble before Jund's efficient beaters ended things in Bonifacio's favour.

    Vasco Bonifacio vs. Lorenz Calzolari

    For game two, Calzolari had to contend with Slaughter Games which took his deck's namesake spell, while looking at a Dark Confidant drawing his opponent a slew of extra cards. A second Slaughter Games took Wurmcoil Engine, leaving Calzolari drawing very thin for ways to stay in the game. One attack step later it was all over.

    Vasco Bonifacio wins 2-0

    Mitchell Manders vs. Martin Scheinin

    In the battle of the control decks, Mitchell Manders had more aggression to bring to the table with his Red/White/Blue deck than the more ponderous game from Spaniard Martin Scheinin. While Schenin was making some nice long game gains with Life from the Loam and some Lingering Souls, he did not have the ability to deal with Manders' deck supporting a Geist of Saint Traft/Restoration Angel offence with Lightning Helix and Lightning Bolt as the burn suite in game one.

    Martin Scheinin vs. Mitchell Manders

    Game two saw Manders carrying on where he left off, with flash creatures to disrupt and ultimately attack. Vendilion Clique came down fast, forcing an early Gifts Ungiven from Scheinin, for Lingering Souls, Darkblast, Batterskull and Academy Ruins. He got Academy Ruins and Batterskull out of it, before losing a card to Vendilion Clique. Geist of Saint Traft was the follow up from Manders, who had no issues with attacking it into Scheinin's team, just to get some damage in. The Geist, in spite of being blue and white, lived in the red zone, slowly but surely whittling down Scheinin's life total. Lightning Bolts stymied Scheinin's ability to effectively block, meaning that before long Scheinin was on just five life. An end of turn Aven Mindcensor threatened a lethal final swing, and while Scheinin had an Abrupt Decay for the 2/1 flyer to keep himself at 1 life, his draw step did not yield further answers to the hexproof beater, and soon Scheinin was extending his hand.

    Mitchell Manders wins 2-0

    Louis Deltour vs. Mathieu Deloly

    Mathieu's Kiki-Jiki Pod deck looked to have got off to a pretty unbeatable start with very fast Noble Hierarch into double Wall of Roots and Birds of Paradise. Soon thereafter he gained a little life with Kitchen Finks, and was ready with Restoration Angel in response to a potentially lethal Scapeshift from Louis Deltour, to gain life by flickering his Finks, going just out of range. Unfortunately for him, Deltour had enough gas to be able to play a second Scapeshift soon after to take game one.

    Mathieu Deloly vs. Louis Deltour

    Game two was, if anything, more straightforward for Deltour. Without as quick a start to contend with, Louis was able to bait a Negate out of his opponent with Cryptic Command, to clear the way for a Scapeshift with nine lands in play, more than enough to get two copies of Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle and the Mountains required to end the game in decisive fashion.

    Louis Deltour wins 2-0




     

  • Semifinals Feature Match – Mitchell Manders (UWR) vs. Louis Deltour (Scapeshift)

    by Tobi Henke

  • "I'm actually terrible," Manders tried to reassure his opponent. "I just topdecked the whole day long."

    "Well, then don't do that against me please," Deltour replied.

    Game 1

    Deltour started on Sakura-Tribe Elder, which for once got in for some damage, while Manders played nothing but lands. Okay, 1 damage to be precise. Then the Elder searched up an extra land, as did Farseek.

    Louis Deltour

    Manders's Vendilion Clique met heavy resistance in the form of two Remands but finally resolved and gave Manders valuable insight into Deltours hand: all land and one Pyroclasm which went to the bottom of Deltour's library.

    Manders tried Geist of Saint Traft, Deltour responded with Cryptic Command. Manders had Remand and decided to use it on the Command, while Deltour, despite eight lands, didn't have the right mana to recast it. Manders also played an Eiganjo Castle, so he wasn't even vulnerable to a possible Pyroclasm topdeck. Together, Vendilion Clique and Geist of Saint Traft quickly took Deltour into the single digits, and when I quickly peeked at Manders's hand I saw Aven Mindcensor and Mana Leak to prevent a possible Scapeshift kill. Deltour had no Scapeshift anyway, even after he bought himself another turn (plus an extra card) via Cryptic Command. He drew his last card and shuffled up for game two.

    Mitchell Manders 1-0 Louis Deltour

    Game 2

    Deltour led with Serum Visions and Sakura-Tribe Elder, while Manders's first play was Geist of Saint Traft on turn three, which went uncontested. Deltour sacrificed the Elder at the end of his opponent's turn, then cast Cryptic Command during his, bouncing one of Manders's lands and drawing a card.

    Mitchell Manders

    Geist of Saint Traft started to apply serious pressure. Deltour tried Pyroclasm, but Manders did in fact remember he had an Eiganjo Castle and also wasn't afraid to use it (i.e. afraid to tap out). Geist and its trusty Angel attacked twice, and Manders sped up the clock further with Lightning Bolt and Electrolyze. The latter met Dispel and Deltour tried to prevent some combat damage as well, with Cryptic Command, but that never even resolved. In response, Manders summoned a game-ending Snapcaster Mage to advance to the finals.

    Mitchell Manders 2-0 Louis Deltour




     

  • Semifinals Feature Match – Lukas Jaklovsky vs. Vasco Bonifacio

    by Tim Willoughby

  • There was only the potential for one Jund mirror within the top eight, and it realised itself for our semifinal between Pro Tour regular Lukas Jaklovsky and Portugues player Vasco Bonifacio. Bonifacio was not qualified for Pro Tour Dragon's Maze prior to this weekend, so his quarterfinal win would mean at least one trip for him, and potentially two, as between the points he's gained from this Grand Prix, and those he will get for the Pro Tour, he may be able to get into a position of being able to represent his country at the World Magic Cup.

    For the semifinals, it seemed that Jaklovsky had the run of things for the early game, getting an active Liliana of the Veil, and having appropriate removal to keep his opponent's side of the board clear, while he rumbled into the red zone with Bloodbraid Elf. A second Elf was revealed as the last card in Jaklovsky's hand from Inquisition of Kozilek, and soon came down, bringing a Dark Confidant with it. The Confidant was hit by Dismember, and Liliana was offed by a second copy on the other side of the board thanks to the legend rule, but the Portuguese player was certainly on the back foot. When his own Bloodbraid Elf hit a Deathrite Shaman that was forced to chump block, Bonifacio knew it was time for him to pack in his cards and look to his sideboard.

    Lukas Jaklovsky 1 – 0 Vasco Bonifacio

    Vasco Bonifacio

    On the play, Bonifacio started out with a Grim Lavamancer. The creature, given sufficient time, had the potential to dominate many creatures that could come from Jund. It seemed that Jaklovsky thought so too, casting his own. A Burst Lightning offed the 1/1, giving Vasco board advantage, and Jaklovsky was a little on the slow side with his second turn plays as a result. A Verdant Catacombs fetched an untapped Overgrown Tomb, to allow a second turn Tarmogoyf. The Tarmogoyf was soon matched on the other side of the board.

    A Kitchen Finks from Jaklovsky helped him bring his life total back up a little, and would prove a fine foil to any one-for-one removal spells. It attacked into Tarmogoyf, allowing a Lightning Bolt to finish off the Lhurgoyf. Jaklovsky had manoeuvred the game such that he had the only Tarmogoyf on the board, and pressed his advantage by casting Bloodbraid Elf before his opponent, who had missed his fourth land. He saw Olivia Voldaren, Lightning Bolt, Bituminous Blast and two copies of Bloodbraid Elf. Jaklovsky took the one spell that Bonifacio could cast immediately in Lightning Bolt, wincing a little at the power of his opponent's hand. A land meant Bloodbraid Elf from the Portuguese player the very next turn, which in turn brought Tarmogoyf.

    Jaklovsky tried to go over the top of such threats as Tarmogoyf with a Batterskull. Bonifacio simply played more copies of Bloodbraid Elf, and was able to cascade into an Abrupt Decay, which killed off Tarmogoyf on the other side of the board.

    Still more copies of Bloodbraid Elf rained onto the board, with the next cascade coming from Jaklovsky, who got a Deathrite Shaman that soon died to Grim Lavamancer. Bonifacio was a touch low on life, and not able to profitably attack, but with five mana available, he could quite happily play an end of turn Bituminous Blast on the Batterskull Germ. He cascaded into Dark Confidant, which he elected not to play (just in case), and untapped to cast Liliana of the Veil, which soon offed a copy of Bloodbraid Elf. Grim Lavamancer left Jaklovsky with just lands, though admittedly these did include a Raging Ravine, which had been tapped to bounce the Batterskull.

    Lukas Jaklovsky

    Batterskull soon came back from Jaklovsky, who was now facing down Olivia Voldaren to add to his woes. A Bloodbraid Elf from Jaklovsky found Abrupt Decay to take out an opposing Tarmogoyf, and when Bonifacio tapped low, Jaklovsky was quick in playing Lightning Bolt to kill off Olivia Voldaren while it could.

    Now Bonifacio was in a very tough spot. He blocked an attacking Batterskull, and used Grim Lavamancer to kill his own blocker, in order to avoid the lifelink from happening. He couldn't stop all the lifegain though. Soon Lukas' attacks were able to get him up to 18 life, while Bonifacio was still in the low single digits. Deathrite Shaman proved the final nail in the coffin for Bonifacio, meaning that Batterskull didn't even have to attack for the final points.

    Bonaficio extended his hand in defeat. There would be on Jund deck in the finals, but it would not be his.

    Lukas Jaklovsky wins 2-0, advancing to the finals of Grand Prix Bilbao!




     

  • Finals Feature Match – Mitchell Manders (UWR) vs. Lukas Jaklovsky (Jund)

    by Tobi Henke

  • This was it; 988 players had entered the tournament less than 36 hours ago, now it was down to these two to decide the winner. Lukas Jaklovsky, in his third Top 8 (one GP, one World Championship), was playing a standard version of Jund, the very epitome of establishment. Facing him, young Dutch upstart Mitchell Manders got so far with a blue-white-red tempo deck, a rather recent addition to the plethora of succesful Modern strategies.

    Game 1

    Jaklovsky led with Raging Ravine, followed by Treetop Village and Deathrite Shaman. At end of turn, Manders fetched for Mountain, and before he had even put down his library, Jaklovsky had already binned his Shaman because of the Lightning Bolt that was sure to follow.

    Mitchell Manders

    Jaklovsky had another creature on turn three in Kitchen Finks, and now Manders had one as well: Geist of Saint Traft.

    Jaklovsky summoned Bloodbraid Elf, cascading into Thoughtseize. He saw a hand of Path to Exile, Snapcaster Mage, Tectonic Edge, Plains, and Steam Vents, and took the Snapcaster Mage. Both Elf and Kitchen Finks attacked, and Geist of Saint Traft returned the favor. Manders also destroyed Jaklovsky's Treetop Village with Tectonic Edge.

    Another hit by Bloodbraid Elf/Kitchen Finks brought Manders to 6 and Jaklovsky showed two Lightning Bolts to take game one.

    Mitchell Manders 0-1 Lukas Jaklovsky

    Game 2

    Manders mulliganed and played a land, and after Jaklovsky's Inquisition of Kozilek (taking Lightning Bolt), he was left with just four cards in hand: two more lands, Remand, and a second Lightning Bolt.

    The other Bolt was taken as well, this time with Thoughtseize (seeing Path to Exile), and now Jaklovsky felt safe in casting Deathrite Shaman. However, a topdecked Geist of Saint Traft brought Manders back into the game. He cycled Remand, cast Path to Exile on Jaklovsky's freshly-summoned Tarmogoyf, followed by Izzet Charm on Deathrite Shaman.

    Jaklovsky had Bloodbraid Elf but missed on cascade—or at least he chose not to cast the Thoughtseize that was offered to him, because he had misregistered Manders's hand earlier. He thought he knew every card Manders had, when in fact Manders was holding another Path to Exile. Manders took out Jaklovsky's single blocker, Geist and Angel came crashing in once again, and Jaklovsky was all out of answers.

    Mitchell Manders 1-1 Lukas Jaklovsky

    Game 3

    Jaklovsky started on turn-one Deathrite Shaman, turn-two Liliana of the Veil, one of the most-feared opening moves of the format. He followed it up with Tarmogoyf, attacked with Deathrite Shaman (losing it to Manders's first play of the game, Lightning Helix), then played a land, and discarded his last card in hand to Liliana.

    Now the board was: lands on both sides, with nothing else on Manders's, Liliana of the Veil plus Tarmogoyf on Jaklovsky's. However, Manders still had cards in hand, one of which turned out to be Threads of Disloyalty and was put on Tarmogoyf. Liliana made Manders sacrifice the illoyal Goyf, as well as the follow-up Geist of Saint Traft, while Inquisition of Kozilek discarded Path to Exile, leaving Manders with four lands on the battlefield and Batterskull in his hand. Uh-oh, Batterskull would be a real beating in this situation.

    Manders drew his card. No fifth land. He passed the turn to Jaklovsky who used Liliana for discard once again, getting Threads of Disloyalty out of Manders's hand, but also losing his Tarmogoyf, which he had forgot to play before activating Liliana.

    Mitchell Manders

    "No, you see, if I had played it, he would have just kept the Threads of Disloyalty," Jaklovsky joked, looking around sheepishly. "OK, in truth, I simply messed up."

    Now Batterskull entered the fray. Liliana of the Veil lost its last counters to kill the Germ token, but a couple of turns later, a new Germ took its place. Jaklovsky didn't find an answer, and Batterskull, together with Vendilion Clique, took the game.

    Mitchell Manders 2-1 Lukas Jaklovsky

    Congratulations to Mitchell Manders, champion of Grand Prix Bilbao 2013!




     

  • Top 5 Cards of Grand Prix Bilbao

    by Tobi Henke



  • 5. Geist of Saint Traft

    A lot of people going into the weekend were looking for cards that were reason enough not to play the hyper flexible, and very powerful Jund deck. Geist of Saint Traft is a great reason. With hexproof it is very difficult for most removal to handle, and it presents the sort of aggressive clock that means that any kind of a slow start will be severely punished. Shahar Shenhar joked that his zoo deck was 'a Jund deck splashing Geist of Saint Traft' and many of the zoo decks tended to have been put together on those lines. Particular style points go to those using Eiganjo castle, in order to make even the plan of blocking Geist of Saint Traft less easy to enact.





    4. Olivia Voldaren

    In a format like Modern, where card efficiency is critical to most decks, Olivia flies the flag as a card that can dominate board positions while being comparatively difficult to kill. Like a flying, growing Masticore, Olivia has turned around more than one match for Jund decks, killing off problem creatures, while beating in with sufficient force to present a very fast clock on opponents. If you ever reach a point where your opponent is stealing your creatures with Olivia, chances are you are not winning the game.






    3. Izzet Charm

    This Return to Ravnica instant has shown itself to have just the right mix of abilities to fit in neatly to many Modern decks. Being able to counter key spells, kill the likes of Dark Confidant or Deathrite Shaman, or indeed dig for key cards, Izzet Charm is both versatile and powerful. We've seen a bit of Golgari Charm and Rakdos Charm in the sideboards of Jund, but Izzet Charm is the option that has seen the most maindeck play, and with four copies in the deck of Mitchell Manders, it seems likely that it is here to stay.






    2. Boom // Bust

    Bloodbraid Elf into Boom // Bust is the kind of pairing that feels just a little obnoxious. Because Boom only costs two, it is possible to cascade into the spell from a Bloodbraid Elf, and then choose to play the Bust side. This synergy, along with the ability to cast Boom targeting your own fetchland, only to sacrifice it in response, means that the spell has seen outings in both some Jund variants, and more general Zoo builds. With the likes of Scapeshift building up its mana base, mass land destruction is a good way to negate a lot of their hard work. It will be interesting to see where this plan evolves to, as while the cards are not new, they haven't yet been seen much in the format.





    1. Clutch of the Undercity

    This one is all about the Scapeshift deck played by Louis Deltour to a top eight berth, including an undefeated day one run. The dimir transmute card means that Scapeshift decks can, once they have reached seven mana, fetch and play Scapeshift in one fluid motion, adding greater consistency to an already powerful deck. Once black is part of the mix, the Scapeshift decks are also afforded more sideboard options, and can be used to consistently fetch 4 cost sideboard cards like Obstinate Baloth to shore up problematic matchups. Sometimes, just sometimes, it also can be used to bounce a creature, and make opponents lose three. You know, if you really want.






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