Event_Coverage

Taisuke Ishii Steppes All Over the Competition

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The letter T!he final point of damage has been dealt here in the southern city of Kitakyushu. Taisuke Ishii, having ridden his Sealed Deck to a perfect Day one record and Soaring Seacliffs to a Top 8 appearance, slew all comers, expertly piloting his aggressive red/white deck through a trap-laden Top 8 that consisted of some of the best Japanese players on the face of the earth. Ultimately, it was the quick and dirty Plated Geopede and Steppe Lynx that did the brunt of the load bearing. Thanks to them, Ishii was able to bear a load of his own, the weight of the trophy he received for besting Masashi Oiso in the finals to become the 2009 Grand-Prix Kitakyushu champion!




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Yuuya Watanabe   Ken Yukuhiro, 2-0        
8 Ken Yukuhiro   Masashi Oiso, 2-1
       
4 Masashi Oiso   Masashi Oiso, 2-1   Taisuke Ishii, 2-1
5 Katsuhiro Mori    
       
2 Jun'ya Iyanaga   Jun'ya Iyanaga, 2-0
7 Hironobu Sugaya   Taisuke Ishii, 2-0
       
3 Taisuke Ishii   Taisuke Ishii, 2-0
6 Takeshi Takagi    

EVENT COVERAGE TWITTER

  • by Nate Price
    Finals
    Taisuke Ishii vs. Masashi Oiso

  • by Nate Price
    Semifinals
    Round Up

  • by Nate Price
    Quarterfinals
    Round Up

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 8
    Player Profiles


  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 2 Coverage
    Coverage from Sunday, November 1st

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 1 Coverage
    Coverage from Saturday, October 31th

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Info : Fact Sheet

INFORMATION
 1.  Taisuke Ishii $3,500
 2.  Masashi Oiso $2,300
 3.  Jun'ya Iyanaga $1,500
 4.  Ken Yukuhiro $1,500
 5.  Yuuya Watanabe $1,000
 6.  Takeshi Takagi $1,000
 7.  Hironobu Sugaya $1,000
 8.  Katsuhiro Mori $1,000
Pairings Results Standings
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  • Top 8 - Player Profiles
    by Event Coverage Staff
  • Taisuke Ishii
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m a 31-year-old systems engineer.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I started with 3 byes, and ended going 8-0.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Marsh Flats and Soaring Seacliff.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I drafted blue-red for damage and flying beats. The deck did well because of the 4 Soaring Seacliff and Eldrazi Monument I had. I went 3-0 this draft.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    For the second draft, I went black-red with a touch of blue. My best card was Marsh Casualties. I didn’t do so well this time, ending with a 0-2-1 record.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Soaring Seacliff.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Blue-red beatdown.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    I play the “Battle of the Three Kingdoms” arcade CCG.




    Jun’ya Iyanaga
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I am a 22-year-old student.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I started with 3 byes and went undefeated.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Mind Sludge.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I went 1-2 with a red-black deck that had Heartstabber Mosquito as the standout card.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    I built a blue-white aggro deck with lots of 2/3 fliers. I won my first two matches and then drew into the Top 8.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Bounce in general is more important than people think.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Either blue-white or blue-black.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    I like to travel and sightsee.




    Hironobu Sugaya
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m 30 years old. I have a full-time job as a “salaryman”.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I went 7-1 overall with 2 byes.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Adventuring Gear.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I went 3-0 with a blue-black deck that had 2 Vampire Nighthawk in it.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    For the second draft, I went green-black to take advantage of the Harrow and Sorin Markov I picked up. My record was good enough that I was able to draw twice after winning my first match.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Territorial Baloth and Timbermaw Larva.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Mono-green, but only if no one else is trying to draft it. Otherwise, red-black or blue –black.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    I like listening to music—my favorite artist is Vocaloid.




    Katsuhiro Mori
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m a 26-year-old vocational student.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I posted a 6-2 record starting with 3 byes.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Grazing Gladehart.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I chose white-black. I went 3-0, but I didn’t really have any standout cards, just workhorses.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    I ended up with a four-color deck, red/black/green with a splash of white for Emeria Angel. I managed to go 2-0-1 with it.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    None, really.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Black.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    None, really.




    Yuuya Watanabe
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m 20 years old, and I don’t do anything except play Magic (laughs).
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I went 7-1 with 3 byes.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Sphinx of Jwar Isle.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I built a blue-white flying beatdown deck with Welkin Tern. It went 2-1.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    Blue-white again, except this time my theme was Allies. I had Kazandu Blademaster, Umara Raptor, and Journey to Nowhere. It was pretty easy to go 3-0.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Reckless Scholar.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Something with blue fliers.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    I like playing “Dream Club” and “Rail Gun”on Xbox.




    Masashi Oiso
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m 25 years old, and I go to university full-time.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I was undefeated with 3 byes.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Goblin Guide and Goblin Bushwhacker.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I went 2-1 using a white-red deck with a lot of equipment cards. My big cards were Kor Duelist, Plated Geopede, and Adventuring Gear.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    I had a red-black hedron deck that used 3 Hedron Scrabbler, and again Plated Geopede and Adventuring Gear. I won my first two matches and drew into the Top 8.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Hedron Scrabbler.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    HedronPlated Geopede and Adventuring Gear.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    JUBEAT RIPPLES




    Ken Yukuhiro
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I attend vocational college, and I’m 20 years old.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I went 7-1 with just one bye.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Kalitas, Bloodchief of Ghet.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    My deck was red-black, and I went undefeated. My MVP was Kazuul Warlord.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    I drafted red-white this time, and went 1-1-1. The best card was Warren Instigator.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Mind Sludge.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    Either mono-black or mono-white.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    I like to play board games and soccer.




    Takeshi Takagi
    How old are you, and what do you do when you’re not playing Magic?
    I’m a 27-year-old freelancer.
    How many byes did you have for this Grand Prix? What was your record on Day 1?
    I didn’t have any byes. I finished 6-2.
    What was your best card or cards in the Sealed Deck?
    Quest for the Gemblades.
    Tell us about your first draft? What colors did you pick, and which card or cards helped you the most? How did you do?
    I went 2-0 (with one bye) using a red-black deck featuring Plated Geopede.
    Tell us about your second draft.
    I drafted red-green and got a lot of mileage out of Timbermaw Larva. I went 3-0 in that pod.
    What card you think is currently undervalued in this draft format?
    Timbermaw Larva.
    What colors do you want to be drafting in the Top 8?
    I just want to cooperate with the other players and will take whatever comes my way.
    What hobbies do you have outside of Magic?
    The “Battle of the Three Kingdoms” arcade CCG.

     

  • Quarterfinals - Roundup
    by Nate Price
  • Standing in the middle of the Feature Match area, I had the King Railbird spot for this Top 8 Quarterfinals round. Unfortunately for me, this was a Top 8 at a Japanese Grand Prix. The players were almost playing faster than I could keep up. Here are the big hits:

    Jun’ya Iyanaga had a sick little double Welkin Tern/Trusty Machete opener in his match against Hironobu Sugaya. Backed up with an Into the Roil, I figured this game was going to be over in a jiffy, so I wandered to the other side of the Feature Match square to keep an eye on some of the other matches. By the time I wandered back, it became clear that Iyanaga’s deck hadn’t given him anything beyond the great start. Sugaya had used Hideous End to slow Iyaga down significantly and had added a fair amount of pressure of his own through Surakar Marauder and Cobra Trap. At this point, it was actually Sugaya that was taking the bigger swings. The Into the Roil came into play eventually, though, and the Welkin Tern with a Machete in its beak finally crossed the finish line.

    Jun’ya Iyanaga 1 – Hironobu Sugaya 0

    Yuuya Watanabe was playing Ken Yukuhiro on one of the adjacent tables. This match ultimately came down to each player’s unblockable creatures. Watanabe had Bladetusk Boars while Yukuhiro had Windrider Eels. Yukuhiro had gone first, as well as hitting his land drops, and ultimately, his 4/4s were bigger than Watanabe’s 3/2s, giving him the match.

    Yuuya Watanabe 0 – Ken Yukuhiro 1

    The titanic Quarterfinal match in the opposite corner pitted Masashi Oiso and Katsuhiro Mori, two good friends and old-timey Magic Pros against one another. Their first game was a battle of attrition. Mori supplied threat after threat, and Oiso dealt with each one in turn. Eventually, the one threat that stuck, the unblockable Halo Hunter, got to turn sideways enough times to give Mori the first game.

    Katsuhiro Mori 1 – Masashi Oiso 0

    In his match against Takeshi Takagi, Taisuke Ishii got the stereotypical red/white dream draw of Steppe Lynx/Plated Geopede/basic lands. It ended very shortly thereafter. The second game went nearly as fast, ending when a Steppe Lynx with an Explorer’s Scope got some Nimbus Wings and crashed over Takagi’s ground troops for the final seven points of damage just a few turns into the game.

    Takeshi Takagi 0 – Taisuke Ishii 2

    Watanabi was staring down at many fliers.

    The Oiso/Mori match had a rather anticlimactic Game 2. With Mori up a game, Oiso caught him mana flooded and just started to run over him. Eventually, the mana flood caught up with Oiso as well, but when you have an Adventuring Gear on a River Boa, that’s not exactly a bad thing.

    Katsuhiro Mori 1 – Masashi Oiso 1

    Iyanaga’s second game against Sugaya was much different than his first. He spent the early turns of this game coming up with answers to Sugaya’s spells. Eventually, when Sugaya started to run low on threats, Iyanaga managed to get a Bog Tatters in play. Once that Tatters picked up a Machete, things got violent. An Into the Roil to clear the way later, and Iyanaga was one match closer to repeating as Kitakyushu champion.

    Jun’ya Iyanaga 2 – Hironobu Sugaya 0

    With all of the other matches finished, I finally got a chance to sit down and watch the Mori/Oiso match a little more in depth.

    Mori got on the hot foot in the final game of his match against Oiso. Vampire Lacerator and Surrakar Marauder worked together to quickly shred Oiso’s life. Oiso made a move to defend it, recruiting Nissa Revane to help him search out some of Nissa’s Chosen to help defend them. With the path now blocked, Mori added a Hagra Crocodile to his side to help get at Oiso. At the end of Mori’s turn, Oiso had a bit of an aside with a judge trying to get some rules questions straight. After reappearing, he aimed a Burst Lightning at the Crocodile, frying it.

    With his Chosen now in place, Oiso decided to have Nissa gain four life, two for the Chosen and two for the Sunweaver Druid he had played on the third turn. In addition, his glut of mana allowed him to kick a Moss Shambler at Mori’s lone Swamp, neutering his ability to catch up. Now behind in lands and life, and with a relative inability to attack, Mori was in quite the tight spot. A land gave him the ability to attack Nissa with his Marauder, and he halved her loyalty to Oiso.

    On Oiso’s next turn, he sent his two creatures into attack. Mori shoved his Lacerator in the Shambler’s way and let it die. When Oiso went to use Nissa to gain life, Mori responded with a Punishing Fire to finish the wounded beast off, getting his Fire back thanks to Nissa. Oiso would now have to be very careful about gaining life. He just played a Oran-Rief Recluse and passed the turn.

    An Arid Mesa from Mori let his Marauder attack Nissa down to one. Now, the giants started coming down on Mori’s side. Shatterskull Giants, to be exact. Oiso had some giants of his own, putting a Gigantiform on his Spider, creating a giant spider even more giant than Giant Spider. With this massive monster in play, and Mori Swampless, it seemed like the game was well in hand. A couple of turns later, that was proven correct.

    Katsuhiro Mori 1 – Masashi Oiso 2

     

  • Semifinals - Roundup
    by Nate Price
  • With Watanabe out of the Top 8, the favorite to take the title here in Kitakyushu had to be Masashi Oiso. Unfortunately for him, the man he had to beat to make it to the finals was the very same Ken Yukuhiro who had run his Windrider Eels all over the PoY leading Watanabe. On the other side of the bracket, Iyanaga and Ishii were locked in an aggressive battle. Both players had blazing starts, with Ishii getting a Plated Geopede and Cliff Threader to Iyanaga’s Surrakar Marauder and Umara Raptor. Ishii took to the sky, giving his Cliff Threaders some Nimbus Wings. He added a second Threaders soon after.

    Back on the other table, Oiso was forced to use a Harrow to find a second green source for his Nissa’s Chosen that would have preferred that Oiso was able to save it for the Adventuring Gear in play. No one can have everything, though, and Oiso was forced to settle for being able to play his spells. Shucks. Yukuhiro, on the other hand, went for the first five turns of the game with no Islands for his many Windrider Eels. He was able to take advantage of his many Plains for a Devout Lightcaster and later on for an Arrow Volley Trap that ate a Kazuul Warlord and the Chosen. Once he did manage to start bringing in the Eels, Oiso was ready for the first with a Burst Lightning. The second wasn’t as quick to arrive as in his previous match, unfortunately for him.

    Back to the other side, left to right on your radio dial, Ishii hit a patch of ice, slowing down incredibly. With Iyanaga getting a Trusty Machete to wedge in his Raptor’s beak, he was able to take out the big, flying Threader and assert some control over the board. Ishii had drawn an Explorer’s Scope and land, preventing him from gaining any more of an advantage. He was going to have to ride his Geopede and Scope to eke this one out. Unfortunately, while he was waiting to draw some lands to turn his Geopede on, Iyanaga was drawing cards like Umara Raptor and Hagra Diabolist. Combined with his Machete (man, this card is good), he was able to finally start attacking. He was on two life from all of Ishii’s early beats, so he had to wait until he was sure of his defense before he started trying to Kill Ishii.

    While I was watching this game, Oiso managed to plop a Gigantiform on one of his creatures to take his first game. The second game didn’t start as well for him. While he built up his mana base, Yukuhiro built up his air force with two Eels and a Welkin Tern. Oiso was just too far behind by the time he started playing spells, and Yukuhiro just didn’t let up, taking the second game just as Ishii had stolen the other match’s first with a topdecked Burst Lightning.

    Oiso got to be the aggressive on in his last game. An Oran-Rief Survivalist picked up some Adventuring Gear before smashing over for four. His trusty pet River Boa joined him soon after. When Nissa Revane joined to add a Nissa’s Chosen to the mix, it looked bad for Yukuhiro. And then he made two Makindi Shieldmates, effectively neutering Oiso’s attack. In addition, his source of blue was a Sejiri Refuge, preventing the Boa from Islandwalking. Oiso managed to get through the larger one, using Harrow as it was intended: as a pump spell.

    On the other table, Ishii got to go Steppe Lynx, Cliff Threader, Journey to Nowhere to start his second game. A Scope on the Lynx made things even dirtier, and Iyanaga was forced to play defense by giving his Umara Raptor a Spidersilk Net. Over two consecutive turns, Raptors died to Burst Lightning and Magma Rift as Iyanaga slumed against the palm of his hand.

    Oiso decided to put Gigantiform on his Survivalist, a play that had thus far meant he was winning the game. Yukuhiro had a Hookmaster to shut it down after one attack, though, and his fliers looked to turn this into a real race. He was at a terribly low four to Oiso’s twenty, and was going to have to take the restrictor plate off if he was going to get there. Add to that the second Gigantiform Oiso had for his River Boa, and it looked like he had brought a knife to a laser fight.

    Giants. Rawr.

    Right as that was finishing up, Ishii was putting some pants of his own onto the little Steppe Lynx that could. His Nimbus Wings ensured that his eggs were firmly in one basket, and Ishii rode his Lynx every attack step until Iyanaga fell. And fall he did.

    Masashi Oiso and Taisuke Ishii advance to the finals.

     

  • Finals – Taisuke Ishii vs. Masashi Oiso
    by Nate Price
  • The stage was set. Cordoned off in an increasingly empty part of the event hall, the finals of Grand Prix-Kitakyushu was about to start. Despite the rapidly vanishing furniture, the space seemed more stuffed than if had at any point during the weekend. The spectators ringing the table were three deep as Masashi Oiso and Taisuke Ishii shuffled up. As the head judge was announcing the start of the match to the assembled masses, I had to resist the urge to grab the microphone, kick up a little “Final Countdown” by Europe, and announce the players in my best Michael Buffer voice.

    Ishii hit the ground running, as red/white is meant to do. Steppe Lynx and Plated Geopede are always a threat to end any game before it really starts, and this time was no different. Nissa’s Chosen provided Oiso with a little protection, but a Kor Hookmaster from Ishii took it out of the picture for a couple turns, which might end up being the rest of the game. When Oiso tried to make a Turntimber Basilisk, Ishii fried it with a Burst Lightning. Oiso slowed the beats some with an Inferno Trap, taking out the first-striking Geopede. He added a Timbermaw Larva to his squad, but it immediately traded with Ishii’s Hookmaster. Thanks to Journey to Nowhere, this left Oiso no defenders for Ishii’s Steppe Lynx, which knocked Oiso to eight.

    Thankfully, Oiso had stalled long enough to find the perfect answer to his predicament. A kicked Moss Shambler took out the Journey, returning his Nissa’s Chosen to active duty. Ishii added the “less than aggressive” Pillarfield Ox to his team. On his next turn, Oiso orphaned the Ox with a Torch Slinger aimed at the Steppe Lynx. Oiso started to assault, sending his Chosen and River Boa into attack, while leaving the Shambler back on defense. Slowly, he started to even up the life totals. Eventually, they were even enough that he was able to get the Shambler in on offense as well. The death knell was when Oiso was able to do something I thought might be impossible in draft: kick his Gigantiform to get his second copy. I feel dirty just writing that.

    Taisuke Ishii 0 – Masashi Oiso 1

    You would be laughing, too, if you’d just kicked a Gigantiform
    Even Ishii had to laugh at the manner of his own death. One Gigantiform was probably enough to do him in, but even he could appreciate the rarity of being able to actually kick the rare enchantment. It made the crowd pretty excited, too, as a raucous rumble passed through as Oiso searched through his deck.

    Ishii started down a card in the second game, but, as the Martin Juza Law of Not Losing™ clearly states, if he wanted to win, he had to mulligan.

    His second draw, while keepable, was a little slower than his first game’s opener. He did manage to get the Plated Geopede online early, so it wasn’t like it was that much slower than the first. Oiso had a fairly solid opener as well. Oran-Rief Survivalist came down alongside a River Boa and a Greenweaver Druid. Ishii kept the pressure with his own landwalking Cliff Threaders. He even managed to find a Torch Slingers to kill the Druid. This was important since Oiso had missed a fourth land drop the turn he played it. Oiso’s fast draw had ground to a halt. Without the resources to keep up, the normally lightning-quick Oiso was forced to start really thinking about how to get back into the game. Ultimately, he just added an Adventuring Gear to his side and passed the turn back with Regeneration mana up. The mana was quickly made moot as Ishii played a Hookmaster to lock down the Boa. This forced Oiso to chump the Geopede with his Survivalist to survive. Ishii played his last card after combat: another Geopede. Oiso had an Inferno Trap to deal with the Threaders, but that was it. He left his fate in the hands of Ishii’s deck. The deck chose to provide Ishii with the Plains he needed to trigger both of his Geopedes and even up the match.

    Once again, the Juza Law (not to be confused with more hit-or-miss Jude Law) held up under scrutiny.

    Taisuke Ishii 1 – Masashi Oiso 1

    Oiso, the perceptive player he is, quickly threw away his first hand, realizing that the key to Ishii’s win must have been in his mulligan. Ishii soon followed suit, unwilling to fall behind.

    Oiso began with an Adventuring Gear that was dropped into play alongside a River Boa. Ishii had the first of his Geopedes and a Kazandu Blademaster to be aggressive, b-e aggressive. When Oiso tapped out for a Greenweaver Druid, Ishii aimed a Burst Lightning at the defenseless snake. Oiso got some defense on the board with a 1/4 Joraga Bard and an Oran-Rief Recluse. Despite this surge in defense, what he really needed was a surge in lands. He was stuck on three Forests. While he had the Druid to make more mana, he could probably have used some red mana to help dig him a way out. For the meantime, his lack of Mountains was preventing Ishii’s mountainwalking Cliff Threader from being too big a nuisance. A Teetering Peaks on the Threader gave Oiso the chance to kill it before he drew a Mountain, as well as save some damage, and he blocked it with his Recluse.

    As if on cue, he drew a Mountain and started by aiming an Inferno Trap at Ishii’s Blademaster. That left him with just a Geopede and a Kor Outfitter in play. The Outfitter got some Nimbus Wings, and a Journey to Nowhere pushed the last of Oiso’s true defenders out of the picture. Oiso’s back was really against the wall. After a great deal of thought, brow furrowing, and squinting, Oiso decided to take the four damage. Oiso drew his card, thought for yet another seeming eternity, and attacked with his Druid. After combat, he played an unfortunately unkicked Torch Slinger and passed the turn.

    Ishii can just picture the cup in his hands.
    Ishii drew his card for the turn. It was a Mountain to turn his Geopede on. After playing it, he sent his two three-power creatures on an attack. Oiso took it, dropping to seven. Ishii had a Mark of Mutiny to steal Oiso’s Torch Slinger, sending it in at its former master. This would have forced Oiso to give up his source of extra mana, having to block with the Druid. Instead, Oiso threw an Inferno Trap at the winged Outfitter and took the rest, dropping to one. Now, he sent his Torch Slinger in to attack.

    Ishii was at zero cards in hand, but still held a slightly favorable position for the time being. Rather than wait for things to potentially get worse, he summoned the heart of the cards and plucked a second Mark of Mutiny from the top of his deck to a roar from the crowd. He aimed it at Oiso’s lone blocker, and Oiso extended his hand.

    Taisuke Ishii defeated Masashi Oiso to become your 2009 Grand-Prix Kitakyushu Champion!

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