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Tooth and Nail. Cloudpost. Reap and Sow. Sylvan Scrying.

These are all cards that are barely playable in Limited decks, let alone Constructed. While I did once draft a six Cloudpost deck, I've certainly never been tempted to play any of the others. But, this is the crazy world of sixty card decks, where any land capable of producing more than one mana seems to find its way into something. Temple of the False God, a land that many dismissed almost immediately ("it doesn't produce mana until at least your fifth turn!"), ended up being one of the defining cards of the last block.

Of course, any time you can produce four mana off of two lands, or nine mana off of three, it's worth a second look. Gabriel Nassif, designer of the deck that's coming to be known as TwelvePost, realized that not only could he play four Cloudposts, but there were also eight reasonable ways to search for them in the form of Sylvan Scrying and Reap and Sow.. What do you do with all this mana?

Well, summoning gigantic creatures like Darksteel Colossus is a good start, but you don't want to have to pack your deck full of expensive creatures just so that you'll always have one when you need it. What the deck really needed was a tutoring effect, so that it could play a variety of silver bullets and fetch out the ones that were needed at any given moment.

Enter Tooth and Nail. Not only does this seven mana sorcery allow you to search your deck for two creatures of your choice, but for an extra two you can put them directly into play. Better yet, after searching, you can put any two creatures into play from your hand, meaning that drawing one of the creatures that you wanted to get isn't a problem.

So what's the creature base? Well, a single copy of Darksteel Colossus is a good start. Next, Nassif fit in two copies of Platinum Angel, as a second one is sometimes needed when the first one seems to be in danger. You certainly don't want to be caught without a backup Angel when sitting at zero life. Leonin Abunas makes the cut for sure, since some decks simply cannot handle him in combination with an Angel. He also protects your Darksteel Colossus from the Grab the Reins that some Red decks are running. Finally, Duplicant was also deemed to be good enough for a single copy. It's an answer to every troublesome creature in the format, including Arc-Slogger and even Darksteel Colossus.

Two Viridian Shamans and four Oxidize give the deck a chance in the Affinity matchup, but it certainly seems unfavorable in Game 1. In the sideboard sit four Tel-Jilad Chosens, two more Shamans, and four Chalice of the Void, which can be devastating against Affinity once the initial assault has been weathered. Three Pulse of the Tangle help out against Green decks and a lone Mindslaver comes in against control.

When not summoning creatures, the deck utilizes all the extra mana to abuse both Oblivion Stone and the two main deck Mindslavers. It's nothing like New Orleans, but a number of matches this weekend have been quietly won with "you control target player's next turn."

In fact, quite a few matches have been quietly won by this deck. Raphael Levy is currently sitting in first place at 9-1, while Nassif isn't far behind at 7-3. I never thought I'd see a Block Constructed Pro Tour won by Darksteel Colossus, but the more I see from this deck, the more I'm almost starting to expect it.


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