gpbri13

Justin Robb Triumphant in Brisbane

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The letter L!ocal Hero Justin Robb came to Grand Prix Brisbane a relative unknown with an epic journey ahead of him*.

(*cue epic montage music.)

But like any great Hero worth his salt, it was a journey he'd prepared for. Discovering Magic with New Phyrexia, Robb was hooked. He scoured the internet, devouring videos of people streaming Magic: Online and the live video coverage of Grand Prix events, Pro Tours, and Open Events alike, all the while honing his skills in the local Brisbane Magic scene.

In practicing for this event, he developed an Affinity for the Artifact Aggro deck, and undeterred by his lack of byes, rode it Heroically through the field to the Top 8. There he faced and defeated such legendary Australian Magic foes as Dan Unwin and Justin "Juzza" Cheung to become the Grand Prix Brisbane Champion!

The Naiads shall sing of this Fabled Hero for generations.

And now, an even bigger quest. Along with Unwin, Cheung, and Ben Tudman, together, they will journey to Valencia, Spain in 2014, to compete at Pro Tour Born of the Gods.




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Justin Cheung   Justin Cheung, 2-0        
8 Wee Yuen Khor   Justin Robb, 2-1
       
4 Cameron Harris   Justin Robb, 2-1   Justin Robb, 2-0
5 Justin Robb    
       
2 Garry Wong   Daniel Unwin, 2-1
7 Daniel Unwin   Daniel Unwin, 2-0
       
3 Wilfy Horig   Ben Tudman, 2-1
6 Ben Tudman    










EVENT COVERAGE INFORMATION

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 5 Cards of GP Brisbane 2013

  • by Pip Foweraker
    Finals
    Justin Robb (Affinity) vs. Dan Unwin (B/G Souls)

  • by Ray "blisterguy" Walkinshaw
    Semifinals
    Justin Robb (Affinity) vs. Justin Cheung (Jund)

  • by Pip Foweraker
    Semifinals
    Dan Unwin (BG Souls) vs. Ben Tudman (Kiki-Pod)

  • by Ray "blisterguy" Walkinshaw
    Quarterfinals
    Dan Unwin (GBW Midrange) vs. Garry Wong (GR Tron)

  • by Pip Foweraker
    Quarterfinals
    Ben Tudman (Kiki-Pod) vs. Wilfy Horig (BG Souls)

  • by Pip Foweraker
    Quarterfinals
    Justin Robb (Affinity) vs. Cameron Harris (R/G Tron)

  • by Pip Foweraker
    Quarterfinals
    Justin Cheung (Jund) vs. Wee Yuen Khor (Affinity)

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 8
    Decklists

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 16
    Decklists

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Top 8
    Profiles

  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 2 Blog
  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Day 1 Blog
  • by Event Coverage Staff
    Info: Fact Sheet
 1.  Justin Robb $3,500
 2.  Daniel Unwin $2,300
 3.  Justin Cheung $1,500
 4.  Ben Tudman $1,500
 5.  Garry Wong $1,000
 6.  Wilfy horig $1,000
 7.  Cameron Harris $1,000
 8.  Wee Yuen Khor $1,000
Pairings Results Standings
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  • Top 8 Profiles

    by Event Coverage Staff


  • Garry Wong

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Sydney
    Occupation: Student


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    Tron - it's what was left over!

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    A few PT's, top 50 maybe, 5 or 6 PTQ wins.

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Dez's Playhouse

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    No! Thanks to Cryptic Commando's and my lovely girlfriend.




    Cameron Harris

    Age: 27
    Hometown: Brisvegas!
    Occupation: Student.


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    Tron, it was cheap and Karn rules.

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    Top 8'd a PTQ for Theros.

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Good Games Brisbane.

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    Nope! Shout out to Ashleigh!




    Wilfy Horig

    Age: 18
    Hometown: Melbourne
    Occupation: Student / Ian Chin Impersonator


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    BG Souls

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    Top 8 Nationals 2011

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Games Laboratory

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    Need a greater sample size.




    Dan Unwin

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Melbourne
    Occupation: Baller (Watcher of Ian Chin falling over)


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    BG Souls

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    GP Top 8's, Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Games Laboratory

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    No, I didn't want to anger the Gods.




    Justin Robb

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Gold Coast
    Occupation: Student


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    Affinity, it's consistently tier 1 and has amazing sideboarding options. Also, unban Jitte!

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    This one!

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Comics Plus

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    No.




    Justin Cheung

    Age: 32
    Hometown: Sydney
    Occupation: Legal services at NSW Dept. of Education


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    Jund - very solid and consistent deck, allows me to play interactive games. Jack Ding helped brew and Patrick Kim recommended the Thundermaw as a metagame call.

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    2nd at GP Sydney 2013

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Dez's Playhouse

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    No, but perhaps tonight




    Khor Wee Yuen

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Singapore
    Occupation: Banker


    What Modern deck did you play and why?
    Affinity, Go Big Or Go Home. Less decisions, less mistakes!

    What's your best Magic event finish and where/when?
    This is my best finish so far.

    What is your local Magic gaming store?
    Cardmaster Games Singapore, Games Haven.

    Just testing a theory, did you eat Greek food any time in the last two days?
    Nope, but I'd like to thank Joel, Jacky, Lionel, Rudy, Kian and Lucas for lending me cards and advice, and a shoutout to Teams Apollo and Legacy, and Dennis and Ah Jian for helping me register. Thanks guys!




     

  • Top 16 Decklists

    by Event Coverage Staff


  • Sam Sedgman #10
    Grand Prix Brisbane 2013 Top 16 Decklists










     

  • Top 8 Decklists

    by Event Coverage Staff





  • Justin Robb
    Grand Prix Brisbane 2013 Top 8 Decklists


    Wee Yuen Khor
    Grand Prix Brisbane 2013 Top 8 Decklists


    Garry Wong
    Grand Prix Brisbane 2013 Top 8 Decklists





     

  • Quarterfinals: Justin Cheung (Jund) vs Wee Yuen Khor (Affinity)

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Cheung, a veteran player, came into the match looking to use his Jund deck to contain Khor's hyper-aggressive Affinity deck. His sideboarded matches would let him access even more powerful hate for artifacts, but Khor would be able to fine-tune his performance as well, and perhaps edge out the more mid-range Jund deck.

    Game 1

    Cheung opened with a Deathrite Shaman after Khor mulliganed to 5, with an Inquisition of Kozilek knocking a Cranial Plating out of Khor's hand. Cheung had a Tarmogoyf to add to the pressure, while Khor summoned an Arcbound Ravager to try and battle the Tarmogoyf. Cheung used a Lightning Bolt to force Khor all-in on his Ravager, going landless to keep his robot alive.


    Justin Cheung

    Khor swung back with his Ravager and Cheung let it sail through, then used a Maelstrom Pulse to off the Ravager. Khor had an Inkmoth Nexus which happily took the counters from the Ravager, but Cheung's attacks dropped him too low to stabilise.

    Game 2

    Khor started the second game off with more verge, dropping a Vault Skirge and a Signal Pest. Cheung threw a Lightning Bolt at the Pest, and Khor had a Thoughtseize to strip out an Abrupt Decay from Cheung's hand, still leaving him with powerful all-stars like Deathrite Shaman, Maelstrom Pulse, Dark Confidant and Tarmogoyf to battle with.


    Wee Yuen Khor

    Cheung summoned his Tarmogoyf and Shaman, and an Inquisition of Kozilek was met with a Galvanic Blast from Khor, dropping Cheung to 10. Cheung used his Pulse to take out the Vault Skirge and then summoned a Huntmaster of the Fells, ramping the aggression up against Khor, who was thoroughly overwhelmed.

    Justin Cheung 2 - Wee Yuen Khor 0




     

  • Quaterfinals: Justin Robb (Affinity) vs Cameron Harris (R/G Tron)

    by Pip Foweraker

  • The first round of the Top 8 for Robb was a race, pure and simple - could he punch through enough damage with his aggressive Affinity deck before Harris could bring his incredibly powerful spells online? Not running any maindeck disruption, it may prove a challenge to mount enough pressure before Harris could stabilise.

    Game 1

    Robb came blazing out of the fates with a pair of Signal Pests and a Vault Skirge, who grew even more threatening with a Cranial Plating. Harris used his cantripping artifacts to dig through his library at speed, assembling Urzatron pieces as quickly as he could. Unfortunately, that just wasn't fast enough, with Robb taking the first game with lightning speed.


    Justin Robb & Cameron Harris

    Game 2

    Harris had better luck in the second game, an Ancient Stirrings completing his set of Urza lands and bringing his powerful engine online. He started things off with a Wurmcoil Engine, then liked it so much he played another. Robb, forced to the defensive, dug for an Inkmoth Nexus, but couldn't find anything before the Engines rumbled through to even the scores.

    Game 3

    Robb came out of the gates in fine form, with an Ornithopter, Vault Skirge and a Cranial Plating to make things interesting. Harris had no defensive plays for the first few turns, taking a prodigious amount of damage from the Plating-assisted Vault Skirge. Digging for answers, Harris finally drew a Pyroclasm but was colour-stuck, and he died to the onrushing robo-swarm on the next turn.

    Justin Robb 2 - Cameron Harris 1




     

  • Quarterfinals: Ben Tudman (Kiki-Pod) vs Wilfy Horig (BG Souls)

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Horig entered the Top 8 needing to out-manoeuvre Tudman's tricksy Kiki-Pod deck, which packs a variety of strategic options. The raw power and consistency of the BG shell got him this far, but would it be enough to push him through to the next round?

    Game 1

    Horig opened early with a Dark Confidant after a Thoughtseize took out Tudman's Fiend Hunter. Tudman played a Spellskite and a Kitchen Finks to try and slow him down, but couldn't answer the Dark Confidant early in the game.

    Horig had a Lingering Souls to punch some damage through the air and a Tarmogoyf to bolster his ground offense, while Tudman cast a Deceiver Exarch to try and slow things down apace. Horig flashed back his Lingering Souls, and even though the ground assault was stymied, his fliers began taking large chunks out of Tudman's life total. Tudman had a Chord of Calling for an Izzet Staticaster to take out all of Horig's Spirit tokens.


    Wilfy Horig

    Tudman summoned a Restoration Angel, flickering his Deceiver Exarch and tapping down Horig's Tarmogoyf for a turn. A few more attacks from Horig, though, chewed through what defences Tudman had mustered, with his Kiki-Jiki sitting unsummoned on the top of his library when he died.

    Game 2

    Tudman opened up with a Noble Hierarch and a Kitchen Finks, while Horig had a Tarmogoyf to start his plays. A Restoration Angel on his Finks kept his life total comfortable, and a Spellskite to shore up the ground. Horig used a Dismember to kill Tudman's Restoration Angel, and a Thoughtseize took the Kiki-Jiki from his hand before any shenanigans could commence.

    Tudman found and cast a Birthing Pod, and began ramping up his creatures. Horig, unable to keep pace as his creatures were stolen and killed, fell to Tudman's self-improving army in short order.

    Game 3

    Tudman's Scavenging Ooze faced down against Horig's Tarmogoyf in the final game. When the 'Goyf attacked, Tudman used a Birds of Paradise to shrink Horig's graveyard, killing the Tarmogoyf and earning an annoyed headshake from Horig.

    Horig played his own Ooze, and Tudman summoned a Spellskite and followed up with a Kiki-Jiki. Copying his Scavenging Ooze, he sent both in at Horig, who activated his Treetop Village and double-blocked the Tudman's Ooze, ending the combat step with a squelching noise as both Oozes headed to the graveyard.

    Horig summoned a Liliana of the Veil and made Tudman sacrifice a creature, his Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker hitting the bin. Tudman summoned a Thrun, the Last Troll, and began attacking with his team. Horig played defensively where he could, but scooped up his cards after no answers were forthcoming.

    Ben Tudman 2 - Wilfy Horig 1




     

  • Quarterfinals: Dan Unwin (GBW Midrange) vs. Garry Wong (GR Tron)

    by Ray “blisterguy” Walkinshaw

  • "I don't know anything about Modern, really," Garry Wong admitted. "Everyone else I'm staying with is playing Jund, so I got what was left."

    "That's funny, I actually assumed that was why you were playing Tron," remarked Dan Unwin. "I've played this match 3-4 times this weekend, and I'm X-0, so I'm probably a bit overconfident here."

    "If he says it's good for him, I believe him," Wong laughed.

    Unwin would try to set up a clock with his Green/Black Lingering Souls while disrupting Wong's Green/Red Urzatron deck. Wong will be aiming to get a set of Urza's lands into play and use them to power out some big-hitters like Karn Liberated and Wurmcoil Engine.

    "Is Go for the Throat 'destroy target artifact creature'?" Wong asked as they browsed each other's decklists.

    "It is, it's really good against you," Unwin dead-paned. "Emrakul's not an artifact, though!"

    "Yeah, you could try that," Wong allowed with a chuckle.


    Garry Wong

    Having finished higher in the Swiss rounds of the tournament, Wong got to play first, quickly assembling UrzaTron (Urza's Tower, Urza's Power Plant, and Urza's Mine) and landing a Karn Liberated on the battlefield. Unwin battled back with Tarmogoyfs and Lingering Souls tokens, while trying to keep Wong's mana at bay with Tectonic Edges.

    However, an untimely Thoughtseize caught an Emrakul, Aeon's Torn as the last card in Wong's hand, which shuffled the depleted UrzaTron pieces back into his deck for reuse. Wong continued to keep Unwin's board clean with Oblivion Stones, until he got enough mana in play to be able to search out Emrakul with Eye of Ugin, for which Unwin had no answers.

    Unwin began game two with a Thoughtseize, seeing two Ancient Stirrings, a Chromatic Sphere, and a Relic of Progenitus (leaving Forest, Grove of the Burnwillows, and a Tron piece.) Wong played the Relic, while Unwin summoned a Dark Confidant. Wong untapped and cast a Pyroclasm,


    Daniel Unwin

    "Ugh, you're really good at this game," Unwin bemoaned, before playing a Stony Silence, and then a Liliana of the Veil. Wong struggled to find the right lands as Liliana ate away at both players' hands. It wasn't long before Unwin was able to utilize her ultimate, cutting Wong's board in half. Wong couldn't recover from that, and they were off to game three.

    Unwin mulliganed in the third game, and took the Forbidden Peek.

    "It was the perfect card! I don't know why I do that to myself," Unwin lamented with a laugh.

    Wong played two Urza's Towers, cashing in a Chromatic Star to Sylvan Scrying up a Grove of the Burnwillows. Unwin summoned a Tarmogoyf and followed it up with a Fulminator Mage, which looked to put some very real pressure on Wong's apparently shaky mana.

    Wong played through a Chromatic Sphere and an Ancient Stirrings for a Relic of Progenitus, knocking out both players' graveyards. Unwin attacked back, before destroying 3 of Wong's lands by carefully stacking a pair of Tectonic Edge activations with his Fulminator Mage.

    Unwin summoned some Lingering Souls and played a Treetop Village, successfully clocking out Wong before he could recover from the death of his lands.

    "Finally broke the curse!" Unwin exclaimed, no stranger to Australian Grand Prix Top 8's, but about to play in his first Top 4.

    If Wong was upset, he didn't show it, as he looked over to his friends. "I came here to draft, and they're drafting without me!" Wong complained with a laugh.

    Dan Unwin defeats Garry Wong 2-1




     

  • Semifinals: Dan Unwin (BG Souls) vs Ben Tudman (Kiki-Pod)

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Unwin sat down to his match with the knowledge that Tudman had just beaten an exact 75-card copy of his deck - hardly a fact to inspire confidence. That said, Unwin has one of Australia's most impressive resumes, and is recognised as being an exceptional deck builder, piloting his own creation. Tudman is living the dream in his first GP entry, and is still feeling his way through the complex lines of play that are Kiki-Pod. Both players settled in for what promised to be an interesting match.

    Game 1

    Both players chatted about their testing as they laid out their opening plays, Tudman with a Wall of Roots and Unwin with a Dark Confidant. Tudman accelerated into a Birthing Pod, laughing as Unwin's Dark Confidant revealed a Maelstrom Pulse, which took out his engine in short order.


    Daniel Unwin

    The next turn, both players repeated their plays, with a second Pod and another Pulse from Unwin. Tudman cast a Voice of Resurgence, and Unwin kept pace with a pair of Tarmogoyfs. The unchecked card draw from his Confidant was beginning to show in the players' relative hand sizes, Unwin trimming Tudman's sails with a Thoughtseize, nabbing a Linvala, Keeper of Silence.

    Unwin attacked with his Tarmogoyfs, taking a chunk out of Tudman's life total before casting and flashing back a Lingering Souls. Tudman summoned a Noble Hierarch and a Birds of Paradise, getting in an attack with a Voice of Resurgence token. Unwin's offensive was implacable, though, using his higher land-count to win an Ooze Battle (Both players making little 'Om nom nom' noises as they fought to exile each other's graveyards) and then cycling through multiple Liliana of the Veil's to take the first game.

    Discussing the game over sideboarding, both players pointed to Unwin's early double-Pulse as the tide-turner. "This deck doesn't have that many ways of dealing with a resolved Confidant, either," observed Tudman as they headed for the second game.

    Game 2

    Tudman started the second game with a mulligan. Unwin opened with a Thoughtseize, seeing Thrun, the Last Troll, Domri Rade and Spellskite. Rather than prevaricating over the two powerful cards, Unwin simply cast a second Thoughtseize and took them both, leaving Tudman with a very lonely looking Spellskite.


    Ben Tudman

    A Liliana of the Veil took care of that next, leaving Tudman looking more than a little dispirited. Unwin followed with a Stony Silence and started ramping up his Liliana. Tudman flashed in an Izzet Staticaster, and Unwin went to kill it, checked himself... And decided to kill it anyway.

    Tudman found and summoned a Kitchen Finks. Unwin used his Liliana to cycle through one layer of persist and summoned a Dark Confidant, then followed it with a Tarmogoyf and a Deathrite Shaman. Overwhelmed, Tudman extended his hand.

    Dan Unwin 2 - Ben Tudman 0




     

  • Semifinals: Justin Robb (Affinity) vs. Justin Cheung (Jund)

    by Ray "blisterguy" Walkinshaw

  • "I've played and beat several Jund decks in the Swiss," Justin Robb stated, "including him," nodding across the table to long-time Australian Magic luminary, Justin Cheung.

    "Yup," Cheung nodded, corroborating Robb's story.

    Robb's Artifact Aggro deck – once affectionately known as "Affinity*," but now eschewing almost all of the cards that feature that keyword – is one of the more explosive decks in the format, thanks to the powerful Cranial Plating. Cheung's Jund deck is more predictable, playing monsters to attack, and spells to destroy their things or take away the cards in their hand. Cheung would be the defensive player in this match, looking to keep the explosiveness of Robb's deck in check, while returning fire with Tarmogoyf's and Scavenging Oozes.

    (*my lawn! My precious lawn!)

    Both players mulliganed, Cheung to 6, and Robb down to 5.

    "My first hand was 4 land, 2 zero drops and a Ravager, and with him on the play, that's way too many opportunities for him to get that Ravager with a Thoughtseize or an Inquisition of Kozilek," Robb explained. "My 6 card hand was a single land and a bunch of expensive stuff, but I kept my 5 because if I drew a land, I'd be fine."


    Justin Cheung

    Robb didn't draw a land, and died to Cheung's hordes with a solitary Mox Opal in play.

    "That's not how it's meant to go, no," Robb admitted. "Usually I win game one, and then manage to steal one of the sideboarded games."

    Things went much better in game two for Robb, who managed to ride a Signal Pest and a pair of Inkmoth Nexuses through a storm of removal thanks to a pair of Spellskites.

    In the deciding game, Robb again deployed a flurry of artifacts, surrounding an Arcbound Ravager with a pair of Ornithopters. The Ravager ate one flier, but fell to a Maelstrom Pulse, shedding its counters on the other. Robb summoned a second Ravager and passed back the turn, his board completed by an Inkmoth Nexus and two Blinkmoth Nexuses.

    Cheung summoned an Obstinate Baloth to go with his Deathrite Shaman, putting himself back up to 14 life. Robb played a third Blinkmoth and a Mox Opal. He animated the first 2 Blinkmoths, and attacked Cheung back to 10 with the 2/4 Ornithopter and the lands.


    Justin Robb

    Cheung untapped and gave his predicament some thought. He attacked Robb down to 16 with the Baloth, and played a Dark Confidant, leaving a Blackcleave Cliffs, a Treetop Village, and his Deathrite Shaman open.

    Robb animated all 3 Blinkmoths, and sent them in alongside his Ornithopter. With Cheung on 10 life, Robb could potentially feed most of his board to the Ravager, and then dump it all on whatever flier Cheung didn't deal with. Unwilling to flinch, Cheung took 5 to fall to 5, and then gained 2 life with his Shaman.

    The Confidant stung Cheung for 2, and he attacked with both the Confidant and the Baloth to put Robb to 10. Cheung cast a second Shaman and sent the turn back with Forest, Village, and the Cliffs open, and 2 cards in hand.

    Robb considered his attack. He played a second Inkmoth Nexus and activated the trio of Blinkmoths, before casting another Ornithopter. Robb fed the new Ornithopter to his Ravager, and then tried to move the counters over to the other one, but Cheung had the Abrupt Decay to stymie that plan. Cheung's Shaman put him back to 7, before the rest of Robb's team dropped him to 2.

    Cheung considered the imminent upkeep costs he was about to pay on his Confidant. If he chose to gain life with both Shamen, he could only attack back for 6 with the Baloth and the Confidant, and Robb was on 10. If he gained life with just one Shaman, he still lacked the third green source he needed to activate his Treetop Village to attack back for 10 with the Village, Baloth, and remaining Shaman. Cheung decided his only option was to hope that his Confidant would exact no more than a 1 life toll.

    He untapped with a shrug, and flipping over a Fulminator Mage.

    Justin Robb defeats Justin Cheung 2-1 and advances to the finals to face Dan Unwin.




     

  • Finals: Justin Robb (Affinity) vs. Dan Unwin (B/G Souls)

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Robb had blazed his way through the finals with his hyper-aggressive Affinity deck. Standing between him and the championship trophy is veteran Planeswalker Dan Unwin, lauded deckbuilder, playing a carefully sculpted B/G deck rife with pinpoint removal and a card advantage engine to make blue mages everywhere weep with envy. Would Unwin be able to stave off Robb's assault enough to take the match, or would the mechanoid menaces be too much for him?


    Unwin stares down a robot army.

    Game 1

    Unwin led play with a first-turn Thoughtseize, showing Robb's hand of 2x Mox Opal, Cranial Plating, Galvanic Blast and Etched Champion. Unwin took the Champion and followed up with a Deathrite Shaman, while Robb found a second Inkmoth Nexus and cast his Plating.

    After a Mox Opal, Robb's Galvanic Blast took out the Shaman, and Robb followed up with an Arcbound Ravager and an Ornithopter, while Unwin rebuilt with a Dark Confidant and then a Tarmogoyf.

    After equipping his 'thopter with the Plating and having the Ravager gobble his Mox, Robb attacked with an Inkmoth Nexus and his Ornithopter, then sacrificed all his artifacts to take Unwin out in one fell swoop.


    Robb starts to feel like a Champion

    Game 2

    Unwin opened the second game with an Inquisition of Kozilek, showing a Vault Skirge, Springleaf Drum, Arcbound Ravager, Inkmoth a pair of Inkmoth Nexi, a Thoughtcast and a Cranial Plating. After some deliberation over the powerful hand, he picked the Plating.

    Robb drew another one off the top, raised his eyebrows, and summoned his Vault Skirge. When Unwin flashed a Thoughtseize, he laughed and spread his hand again, moving to bin the Plating.

    "Hang on, things have changed", said Unwin, eventually picking the Thoughtcast.

    Robb went to a cast his Springleaf Drum, and Unwin killed the Skirge in response with a Dismember. He untapped and summoned a Liliana of the Veil, passing without activating her discard ability.

    Robb tried again with an Etched Champion, who got to stick around, but Unwin took out the Plating with an Abrupt Decay. Robb swung at Liliana with his Champion and a pair of Nexi, but Unwin had two Tectonic Edges to take care of the animated lands.

    Both players were drawing off the top of their decks. Unwin found a Lingering Souls, but Robb doubled down with another Champion. Two unblockable attacks sealed the game, the match and the Grand Prix.

    Congratulations to Justin Robb, your Grand Prix: Brisbane Champion!




     

  • Top 5 Cards of GP Brisbane 2013

    by Event Coverage Staff



  • 5. Lingering Souls

    The only thing better than paying 3 mana for 2 1/1 fliers is paying 2 mana, and Lingering Souls lets you do both. Discard-proof, great on offence and defence, Lingering Souls has been frustrating opponents since it was printed. Slotting perfectly into the popular B/G framework, Lingering Souls is a powerful tool for the aggro and control player alike. And discarding it as part of another spell's cost or resolution? That's just icing on the spooky-flavoured cake.





    4. Thoughtcast

    On the other end of the overcosted / undercosted spectrum, Thoughtcast is a blast from the past that just doesn't quit. Drawing cards for practically free in explosively aggressive artifact decks can only be a good thing, right? GP Brisbane champion Justin Robb ran the full set in his winning list, and they served him in good stead throughout the weekend, letting him recover from tit-for-tat exchanges and refill his grip after an accelerated start.





    3. Emrakul, the Aeons Torn

    Quite aside from being the biggest, baddest monster of 'em all, Emrakul makes for quite the win condition. Whether you're cheating it into play with a Through the Breach or a Goryo's Vengeance, or playing 'fair' by assembling a ridiculous amount of mana, Emrakul is a powerful, versatile win condition. Plus, you're fully justified in bellowing its name when you summon it, which is always fun.





    2. Tectonic Edge

    Destroying lands hasn't been so much fun since Erhnamgeddon '99. With juicy targets all over the format, from greedy manabases to aggressive man-lands, there's always going to be an edge to push your opponents over. Dan Unwin formed his mana base around this powerful, versatile card, and he's way better at deckbuilding than you are. Don't think, just play 'em.





    1. Deathrite Shaman

    The workhorse of the format, Deathrite Shaman is the Swiss Army Knife of midrange decks. It slices, dices, and solves all manner of problems. Often found in the company of the other format all-stars, Tarmogoyf, Scavenging Ooze and Dark Confidant in a delicious, crispy B/G shell. Notable performances include 'Getting rid of flashback cards', 'Voiding reanimation strategies' and the smash hit, 'Enabling turn 2 Liliana of the Veil'. If you're not running this shockingly undercosted utility creature, you'd better have a good reason why.






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