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Grand Prix Hong Kong 2013
Day 2 Coverage

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  • Sunday: 9.00am - Drafting with Yuuya Watanabe

    by Chapman Sim

  • Despite dropping a spot on this week's Top 25 Rankings, 5th ranked player Yuuya Watanabe is still the highest ranked player in this tournament. After a decent 7-1-1 finish yesterday, Watanabe is in a good position to make his 20th Grand Prix Top 8.


    Yuuya Watanabe

    Booster One

    Watanable first picked Arbor Colossus over Purphoros's Emissary, and followed that up with Nimbus Naiad over Staunch-Hearted Warrior. Griptide was an easy third pick out of a relatively weak booster.

    It would seem like he was devoted to Blue and Green but when Purphoros's Emissary and Minotaur Skullcleaver tabled, that was a sign that red was very underdrafted and Watanabe was happy to pick those up in case he ever wanted to switch gears.

    Possibly the biggest dude in the format, unless you count Colossus of Akros.

      Yuuya Watanabe's pick
    1 Arbor Colossus
    2 Nimbus Naiad
    3 Griptide
    4 Nylea's Emissary
    5 Divine Verdict
    6 Nylea's Disciple
    7 Fade into Antiquity
    8 Time to Feed
    9 Purphoros's Emissary
    10 Minotaur Skullcleaver
    11 Vanquish the Foul
    12 Fleetfeather Sandals
    13 Commune with the Gods
    14 Yoked Ox

    Booster Two

    Watanabe's seoncd booster wasn't spectacular, but it did have Centaur Battlemaster. Leafcrown Dryad greeted him in the second booster, one of the best commons in the set. Knowing that red was underdrafted from the previous pack, Watanabe was glad to pick up Ill-Tempered Cyclops (forgoing a second copy of Griptide) and Bloodrage Shaman, before bolstering his army with Deathbellow Raider and a second Minotaur Skullcleaver and solidifying himself in red green, expecting more red goodies to come along the way.

      Yuuya Watanabe's pick
    1 Centaur Battlemaster
    2 Leafcrown Dryad
    3 Ill-Tempered Cyclops
    4 Bloodrage Shaman
    5 Deathbellow Raider
    6 Sedge Scorpion
    7 Satyr Hedonist
    8 Minotaur Skullcleaver
    9 Agent of Horizons
    10 Labyrinth Champion
    11 Scourgemark
    12 Setessan Griffin
    13 Peak Eruption
    14 Messenger's Speed

    Booster Three

    The Gods were on his side (rather, the God was) and he was offered Nylea, God of the Hunt in his third booster which would go well with the Arbor Colossus and Centaur Battlemaster he already had. The fourth pick presented him with Anthousa, Setessan Hero versus Leafcrown Dryad, and he eventually decided with the bestow creature since he was low on 2-drops.


    With Agent of Horizons and Griptide in his pool, he contemplated 5th picking Horizon Chimera for a blue splash and eventually decided to go for it, passing a Portent of Betrayal that he would have otherwise taken. Destructive Revelry gave him the full suite of enchantment removal spells, ensuring that he should have no issues with enchantments and artifacts whatsoever.

      Yuuya Watanabe's pick
    1 Nylea, God of the Hunt
    2 Nessian Asp
    3 Artisan's Sorrow
    4 Leafcrown Dryad
    5 Horizon Chimera
    6 Time to Feed
    7 Destuctive Revelry
    8 Staunch-Hearted Warrior
    9 Fanatic of Mogis (table)
    10 Hunt the Hunter
    11 Setessan Griffin
    12 Pheres-Band Centaurs
    13 Witches' Eye
    14 Demolish

    "There was one point I took Ill-Tempered Cyclops over my second Griptide. I think that was the turning point of the draft. If I had grabbed the second Griptide, I would probably be playing blue and end up with an addition two or three more Agent of Horizons."


    Yuuya Watanabe's Draft Deck

    Having said that, he feels that he should have no problems with a 2-1 record, maybe even 3-0. "I have no pumps and no burn. So maybe I'll just try to make a huge guy and try to win with it."




     

  • Sunday, 10:00 a.m. - Czech Republic Draft Reflections

    by Noel Neo

  • "If you draft a slow deck, you leave yourself vulnerable to your opponent's bombs. You can have a very good deck and still simply lose to something like Elspeth, Sun's Champion. A fast deck allows you to close the game before opposing bombs come online. I don't try to force an aggressive build, but I do assign a slightly higher weighting to cards that fit in an aggressive deck prior to being committed to a strategy."

    - Stanislav Cifka, 9th in the Magic Top 25 Pro Rankings

    Both Cifka and (16) Martin Juza say Theros Limited is very much more about deck synergies than absolute power levels. You need to know the archetype you are trying to draft and evaluate draft picks on how they contribute to your deck's strategy.

    That said, efficient removal is at a premium in this format simply because of its scarcity. Cards like Lightning Strike and Voyage's End go up in value owing to the lower removal count in Theros than in other sets. Even when drafting heroic themed decks, Cifka and Juza would pick removal ahead of creature enhancers because the enhancers can be picked up later in the packs.

    Five toughness also becomes the magic number in this format because this brings the creatures out of range of removal like Lash of the Whip and Rage of Purphoros. This is one of the reasons Nessian Asp is so good.

    On specific picks, Juza likes Voyaging Satyr:

    "It is unique in being the cheapest mana ramp in the format and the tempo advantage is hugely important. When you're the first to summon your large beaters and to go monstrous, it is much easier to push damage through."




     

  • Sunday, 10.20 a.m. - A Walk in the Park

    by Chapman Sim

  • Our guest artist might be relatively new to illustrating for Magic but for the past 8 years he has worked as a senior concept artist for such games and film as Guild Wars, Lineage Forever, Battle Los Angeles, Mortal Kombat, and God of War III.


    Jung Park

    After bringing life to Magic for five years, Jung is here at his very first Grand Prix and he was greeted by a bittersweet surprise. "I literally signed over five thousand cards yesterday and my hands are dying," chuckled Jung. But that could only be a testament to the popularity of his artwork, as well as the enthusiasm of rabid fans.


    Jung Park and a Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx playmat.

    "Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx was hands down the most popular card," and it was not difficult to understand why. The fact that the Legendary Land had dominated at recently-concluded Pro Tour Theros probably contributed to it's extreme popularity. In addition, the stunning piece was also used as the backdrop for Grand Prix Hong Kong's exclusive playmat, with a limited print run of only 800 copies worldwide!

    Inkmoth Nexus and Hallowed Fountain were also really popular, as were cycle of full art Zendikar basics. Rumor has it that a player even requested him to autograph a whooping 150 of those. Jung shared with me that his specialty is in landscapes and scenery and enjoys working on them greatly.


    "When I commissioned City of Brass for Wizards of the Coast, I had no idea that it was going to be used as the packaging artwork for Modern Masters." I can only assume that it is a great honor to have your artwork featured on one of the most premium products in the history of the game.


    Modern Masters

    "I've never played the game due to my busy schedule but I really enjoyed my weekend here today. It was a refreshing change and I'm really happy to meet the community." I'm sure the attendees at Grand Prix Hong Kong were real happy to meet Jung Park too!




     

  • Round 10 Feature Match - Classic Attrition
    (5) Yuuya Watanabe vs. Taku Matsumura

    by Noel Neo

  • With both players at 7-1-1, a loss here would leave a spot in the Top 8 very much in the hands of tiebreakers even if all following matches are won.

    Yuuya Watanabe, ranked 5th in the Magic Top 25 Pro Rankings, is piloting a Red Green deck with a dash of minotaurs. He would need to seal the win against Taku's Green Black deck before Taku's card advantage engine grinds him out of the long game.


    Yuuya trying to push damage.

    Taku opened game one with the hallmark of his archetype, deathtouch creatures – Baleful Eidolon and Sedge Scorpion, which traded with Destructive Relvery and Agent of the Horizone. This bought him the time needed to stabilise with Reaper of the Wilds and get his card advantage engine online with Read the Bones and Pharika's Mender.

    Yuuya's next line of attack was to build out Centaur Battlemaster by taking down Pharika's Mender and Vulpine Goliath with consecutive Time to Feed. However, he had taken eight damage in the time needed to build out this game plan and was facing down Reaper of the Wilds and a newly summoned Nemesis of Mortals.

    With Reaper of the Wilds having deathtouch and without a means of giving his Battlemaster evasion, Yuuya's best play at this point was to force the trade by bestowing Purphoros's Emissary on his Battlemaster and attacking into the two creatures.

    However, it was all for naught as Yuuya was spent and Taku simply rebuilt with Nessian Asp and multiple Cavern Lampad to take game one.


    Taku in control of the game.

    In game two, Yuuya stumbled when he missed his fourth land drop and opted to sacrifice Satyr Hedonist to fuel Staunch-Hearted Warrior in a bid to take the game quickly. It would be the first nail in the coffin as Taku simply untapped and played Pharika's Cure.

    By turn five, Taku had Felhide Minotaur and Nessian Asp to a Yuuya's lone Ill Tempered Cyclops. Yuuya tried to stabilise with repeated Leafcrown Dryads that met consecutive Fade into Antiquity, while the Asp proceeded to take chunks out of Yuuya's life total.


    Battlemaster Warcry.

    In the end, the slower development of Yuuya's board proved fatal as he succumbed to a combination of creature mass and Gray Merchant of Asphodel.

    Taku Matsumura attrits (5) Yuuya Watanabe out of round 10 and advances 8-1-1.




     

  • Round 11 Feature Match - Heroic Maneuvers
    (7) Shuhei Nakamura vs. Shouta Yasooka

    by Chapman Sim

  • 7th ranked Shuhei Nakamura is in search of yet another Top 8 appearance but he finds himself paired against fellow countryman Shouta Yasooka, a worthy opponent with an equally scary resume. Both players have a combined 37 Grand Prix Top 8 appearances between them, hot favorites to actually win this event. However, one of them would soon be eliminated from contention, while the victor would need to win out to secure a Top 8 berth. In the end, it was Shuhei Nakamura who emerged victorious, keeping his dreams alive.

    Game One


    Shouta Yasooka

    Shouta Yasooka took game one by breaking past Shuhei Nakamura's Favored Hoplite and Fabled Hero, using a combination of Gods Willing and Ordeal of Purphoros.


    After a quick trip to Paris, Nakamura could only cough up a lone Favored Hoplite to fend off Yasooka's Leonin Snarecaster. Yasooka declined to attack and opted to develop his position with Borderland Minotaur and Bloodrage Shaman.

    Fearing a trick, he held his creatures back temporarily and Nakamura was happy to use the time to bestow Leafcrown Dryad upon the Favored Hoplite. Ordeal of Purphoros allowed Yasooka to attack, before adding Wingsteed Rider and Lagonna-Band Elder to the board, resulting in yet another standstill, both players fearing a blowout.

    That was until Shouta decided to go all in, an attacked back up with Dauntless Onslaught, reducing Nakamura to 10. Nakamura retaliated with Fabled Hero and Yasooka wasted no time pointing Rage of Purphoros at it. Nakamura tried to save it with his own Dauntless Onslaught but a sacrificed Ordeal of Purphoros finished him off. Gods Willing from Yasooka granted Borderland Minotaur (7/6) protection from white, dealing the lethal blow.

    Nakamura 0 – Yasooka 1

    Game Two


    Shuhei Nakamura

    It was a race between a monstrous Fleecemane Lion and a 4/4 firebreathing Wingsteed Rider and Shuhei Nakamura managed to even the score, forcing a third game.


    Nakamura kept a two-land hand but he was able apply pressure with Fleecemane Lion and Traveling Philosopher.

    Having no play of his own, Yasooka was forced to cycle Dragon Mantle on his opponent's creature, prompting Nakamura to read the card momentarily. Luckily, the Dragon Mantle netted him Wingsteed Rider, which he was happy to cast, leaving a white mana open.

    Upon drawing his third land and forth land, Nakamura summoned Agent of Horizons and Cavalry Pegasus and decided against attacking into the Wingsteed Rider with the knowledge that Gods Willing would result in a reversal of board advantage.

    Once he hit his fifth land, Fleecemane Lion transformed into a 4/4 indestructible kitty and started to take violent swipes at Yasooka's life total. Wingsteed Rider stood in its way and picked up a +1/+1 counter from Gods Willing, surviving the impact. On his turn, Yasooka stuck Dragon Mantle on the Wingsteed Rider and started to race but to no avail.

    Nakamura 1 – Yasooka 1

    Game Three

    An exciting game three saw both players cast Dauntless Onslaught on their opponents creatures but in the end, it was Shuhei Nakamura who managed to overcome Shouta Yasooka's Elspeth Sun's Champion to win the match, advancing to a 9-2 record.

    Fleecemane Lion reared its ugly head once again and it would seem that Yasooka was falling behind, with only Favored Hoplite as his lone creature over 4 turns.

    Yasooka declined to budge, so Nakamura was happy to add more creatures to the board, before finding a good opportunity to "monstrosify" Fleecemane Lion and summon Pheres-Band Centaurs.

    Despite being behind, Yasooka continued to feign weakness, until he reached six mana to recruit Elspeth, prompting Nakamura to wail "HUH?" in despair.


    Knowing that he was out of time, Nakamura quickly used Time to Feed to get rid of Favored Hoplite, forcing Yasooka to chump block Pheres-Band Centaurs, Fleecemane Lion and Staunch-Hearted Warrior with his three Soldier tokens. Nakamura summoned the last two cards from his hand, Cavalry Pegasus and Agent of Horizons, hoping to finish of the powerful Planeswalker next turn.


    Shouta then used Dauntless Onslaught on the Agent of Horizons and Pheres-Band Centaurs, before activating Elspeth's second ability. The wave of reckoning reduced Nakamura's board to just a Cavalry Pegasus and the indestructible Fleecemane Lion, versus Yasooka's Deathbellow Raider.

    It would seem that the upset was happening but Last Breath happened to be sitting on top of Nakamura's library. That allowed him to remove Deathbellow Raider, before using the Fleecemane Lion to send Elspeth to the gallows.

    Shouta Yasooka produced Bloodrage Shaman, and struggled to stay alive but Nakamura had yet another Time to Feed at the ready. Shouta could only point Last Breath at his own creature to stay alive but Nakamura deftly denied that plan by pointing Dauntless Onslaught at the minotaur lord, fizzling Last Breath and denying Shouta the 4 life he needed.

    Nakamura 2 – Yasooka 1

    Shuhei Nakamura manages to overcome Elspeth, defeating Shouta Yasooka 2-1.




     

  • Quick Questions #4:
    What do you most want to open in your draft today?

    by Chapman Sim & Noel Neo

  • Huang Hao-Shan: Lightning Strike
    Shouta Yasooka: Hythonia the Cruel
    Yuuya Watanabe: Elspeth, Sun's Champion



     

  • Saturday, 1.15 p.m. - Reports from the Battlefield

    by Chapman Sim

  • We are done with our first Booster Draft and proceeding on to the second! Let's take a quick look at the top four draft pods to see how the Top 8 could possibly look like.


    Tournament Floor

    Pod 1

    Martin Juza (16) is atop the standings, along with "BFF" Shuhei Nakamura (7) and "Master of Faeries" Yuuta Takahashi.

    The trio will be drafting with 3 other players also at 11-1, including Ng Soon Lye of Singapore (Nationals Top 8 competitor), Christopher Tong of Hong Kong and Lu Xiaoshi of China.

    Rounding out are Grand Prix Singapore 2009 Top 8 competitor, Chen Liang and Grand Prix Beijing 2013 Top 8 competitor Wong Wei Quan. This booster pod looks really stacked but only around half of these players will be able to make the Top 8.

    Pod 2

    Pod two is also looking equally daunting and consists of Pro Tour Return to Ravnica Champ, Stanislav Cifka (9), fellow Top 8 competitor Kelvin Chew from Singapore as well as Pro Tour Avacyn Restored Semifinalist Ken Yukuhiro.

    Huang Hao-Shan's three Grand Prix Top 8s indicate he is the next most experienced player in the pod. Everyone in Pod two are at a 10-2 record and would possibly need to win out to break into the Top 8.

    Pod 3

    Shouta Yasooka has slipped into Pod 3 owing to his slightly worse tiebreakers and I can quite safely say he is the most experienced in his pod. Both China Nationals Top 8 competitors (Lei Yu Sheng & Lei Qiang) and former Hong Kong National Champion, Zhang Meng Qiu will not be going down without putting up a fight.

    Pod 4

    It is also possible that a player from Pod 4 could break into the Top 8, provided they win all their matches in the next draft. Chua Chang (three time Grand Prix Top 8 competitor) is the most accomplished veteran from amongst them, but Grand Prix Shanghai 2012 semi-finalist Satou Rei is no slouch either.




     

  • Quick Questions #5:
    What is the most underrated card in Theros booster draft?

    by Chapman Sim & Noel Neo

  • Shuhei Nakamura: Gods Willing or Aqueous Form
    Martin Juza: Triton Tactics
    Li Bo: Nessian Courser. It is good but actually it is way better than what most people think.
    Stanislav Cifka: Savage Surge
    Yuuya Watanabe: Last Breath. It is so good against all the 2 drops and sometimes the life doesn't matter.
    Ken Yukuhiro: Wavecrash Triton



     

  • Round 14 Feature Match - Blue White Removal Showcase
    Martin Juza vs. Chen Liang

    by Noel Neo

  • Chen Liang, a veteran of Grand Prix Singapore 2009's Top 8 and who has already picked up two losses, is playing to remain in contention for the trophy. (16) Juza is 11-1-1 and is looking to secure his top 8 berth.

    Chen Liang is running with Black Green and Juza wields Blue White heroic supported with strong removal spells.


    Chen Liang

    Juza systematically dismantled Chen Liang's game one defence in three stages:


    Martin Juza

    Game two featured a bit more of an early race as Wingsteed Rider and Omenspeaker traded blows with Erebos's Emissary. The Rider took a Sip of Hemlock, but Juza was able to maintain his offence with Silent Artisan and Aqueous Form on Triton Fortune Hunter. He also had Divine Verdict to remove the last of Chen Liang's creatures.

    With all the scry occurring on Juza's side of the table, it wasn't long before Chen Liang was simply overwhelmed by superior card quality.

    (16) Martin Juza wins 2-0 and is nearly a lock for top 8.




     

  • Sunday, 3:00pm - Drafting with Martin Juza

    by Noel Neo

  • Earlier today, we sat down with Juza to glean insight into his Theros Limited thought process. He expressed a distinct preference for a single card – Voyaging Satyr.

    "It is unique in being the cheapest mana ramp in the format and the tempo advantage is hugely important. When you're the first to summon your large beaters and to go monstrous, it is much easier to push damage through."

    Now at 11-1 and first seed, Juza is very favourably placed for a run at the Top 8. Let's see how he puts a deck together from the ground up.

    Booster One

    Juza started the draft by picking up Horizon Scholar, the most efficient threat in the pack. True to form he followed that with Voyaging Satyr over Minotaur Battlemaster and Baleful Eidolon, but subsequently switched to White with Observant Alseid over Agent of Horizons. The choice rewarded him as Blue and Green dried up, indicating that the players to his right were in those colours.

    Below lists the key cards Juza considered in each pack, with his picks depicted as the leftmost card.

    1 Horizon Scholar, Ordeal of Nylea, Pharika's Cure, Rage of Purphoros, Deathbellow Raider
    2 Voyaging Satyr, Blood-Toll Harpy, Centaur Battlemaster, Baleful Eidolon
    3 Observant Alseid, Agent of Horizons, Tymaret, the Murder King
    4 Divine Verdict, Agent of Horizons, Sip of Hemlock
    5 Hopeful Eidolon, Observant Alseid
    6 Ephara's Warden, Setessan Battle Priest, Fleshmad Steed
    7 Battlewise Hoplite, Lagonna-Band Elder
    8 Coastline Chimera, Staunch-Hearted Warrior
    9 Lagonna-Band Elder
    10 Minotaur Skullcleaver
    11 Aqueous Form, Setessan Battle Priest
    12 Steam Augury
    13 Akroan Crusader
    14 Demolish

    Booster Two

    Despite a number of Green cards appearing, Juza stuck to his Blue White guns. He would later explain this is because Green would be cut again in booster three.

    1 Sea God's Revenge, Triton Tactics, Observant Alseid
    2 Omenspeaker, Nessian Asp, Keepsake Gorgon, Mistcutter Hydra
    3 Griptide, Lightning Strike, Hopeful Eidolon, Omenspeaker
    4 Divine Verdict, Sip of Hemlock
    5 Ray of Dissolution, Silent Artisan, Opaline Unicorn
    6 Wavecrash Triton, Battlewise Valor
    7 Setessan Griffin, Nemesis of Mortals, Time to Feed
    8 Triton Fortune Hunter, Leonin Snarecaster
    9 Borderland Minotaur
    10 Silent Artisan
    11 Shredding Winds
    12 Kragma Warcaller
    13 Ephara's Warden
    14 Witches' Eye



    Juza is not a fan of Anvilwrought Raptor

    Booster Three

    During the booster two review, Juza realised while he has some very strong spells, he lacks in actual ways to close out the game. Hence, his focus for booster three was to shore up his offensive capabilities. He managed to pick up a second pick Wingsteed Rider and would come to rue his fourth pick of Anvilwrought Rapter over Cavalry Pegasus as he would come to have quite a number of human creatures.

    1 Heliod's Emissary, Sea God's Revenge, Lash of the Whip, Tymaret, the Murder King
    2 Wingsteed Rider, Triton Tactics
    3 Gods Willing, Lash of the Whip
    4 Anvilwrought Raptor, Cavalry Pegasus, Setessan Battle Priest (Pegasus would have been better)
    5 Daxos of Meletis
    6 Heliod's Emissary, Evangel of Heliod
    7 Traveling Philosopher, Gods Willing
    8 Chosen by Heliod, Mnemonic Wall
    9 Read the Bones, Thassa's Bounty
    10 Omenspeaker
    11 Prowler's Helm
    12 Setessan Battle Priest
    13 Defend the Hearth
    14 Felhide Minotaur

    Deckbuilding

    Overall, Juza thought his draft was okay (not fantastic) with good cards and a fine curve. His game plan is to play a two or three drop and suit it up, all the while disrupting his opponent's offence through removal and bounce. A weakness is a relative dearth of high power and evasion creatures, so his games are likely to be somewhat draw dependent. Juza also noted the removal he had seen, which meant opponents might be able to disrupt his plan as well.

    Despite some late game spells, Juza is running 17 lands because he has sufficient scry to find them. He pondered long and hard about the relative merits of a second Divine Verdict (reactive) relative to Anvilwrought Raptor (cost inefficient) and Ray of Dissolution (narrow scope), and eventually decided to stick with the verdict.


    Good luck, Juza!




     

  • Round 15 Feature Match - Lei Qiang VS Lei Yu Sheng

    by Chapman Sim

  • The pair of Chinese players found themselves in the unfortunate position of being unable to draw and were forced to battle it out in the final Swiss round of the day. Both players are former China Nationals Top 8 competitors, and also happen to be cousins, which is a great explanation for their identical family name.

    While they were not pleased to be in this precadiment, they proceeded on with the match knowing that at least one of them would make it, putting a second Chinese player into the Top 8 this weekend. When the dust settled, it was Lei Yu Sheng who emerged victorious.

    Game One

    That's a lot of cards!

    The first game was all about card advantage. Bident of Thassa and Warriors' Lesson allowed Lei Yu Sheng to defeat Lei Qiang by simply burying him an endless steam of threats and tricks.

    Lei Yu Sheng had a fast start, powering out Omenspeaker, Agent of Horizons and Bident of Thassa. Lei Qiang had no board presence and sought to find some with Read the Bones.

    Lei Qiang wonders how to beat the extra million cards his cousin drew.

    Using this opportunity, Lei Yu Sheng cast Warriors' Lesson on both of his creatures, netting himself a total of four cards. This allowed him to steamroll over Lei Qiang effortlessly with the grip of cards which he gained, including Vaporkin and Nimbus Naiad, which eventually drew him more cards than his cousin could handle.

    Lei Qiang 0 – Lei Yu Sheng 1

    Game Two


    Lei Yu Sheng led with a pair of Vaporkins that promised to end the game quickly if left untouched. Without any quick solutions like Pharika's Cure, Lei Qiang sought to race with a pair of Agent of Horizons.

    A pair of Vaporkins send Lei Yu Sheng into the Top 8!

    When Breaching Hippocamp jumped out for the first time, Lei Qiang used Boon of Erebos to keep one of his agents alive. If you haven't been following the math, the lone Vaporkin came in for 2 damage, and then both swooped in for 4 the next turn. And then 4 more. Boon of Erebos reduced Lei Qiang to just 8 life, which meant that he was facing a pressurizing two-turn clock.

    Lei Yu Sheng didn't even need the Vulpine Goliath to seal the deal. Now that his cousin was down to just 8 life, all he had to do was to swing twice for the win.

    Lei Qiang 0 – Lei Yu Sheng 2

    Lei Yu Sheng

    Lei Yu Sheng defeats his cousin Lei Qiang to advance to the Top 8!




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