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Floch Reins Supreme in Lisbon

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Over 1,300 players came to Lisbon for the last European Grand Prix of the year. Return to Ravnica was the set of the moment, with first sealed deck, then draft testing the skills of those vying for the title of Champion. The field gradually shrank as more competitors fell by the wayside, unable to keep up the winning pace required to lift the trophy. The finals saw Ivan Floch of Slovakia against Elias Watsfeldt of Sweden, with both hungry for victory.

The final verdict was from Ivan Floch – Supreme Verdict punctuating a three game set where his Azorius build splashing red was able to outmanoeuvre Watsfeldt's aggressive Rakdos deck, and secure victory for the former team World Champion.

The top eight, sporting such names as Johan Verhulst and two time GP Lisbon top eight competitor Helder Carvalho, was a powerful one, supported by a top 16 including Matteo Versari, Martin Juza and Shuhei Nakamura.

As the venue closes down here in Lisbon, we look to the final few events of the season in Toronto and Nagoya where no doubt we will see more fantastic Magic. For now though, it is a time to rest, reflect, and celebrate a great victory from our Grand Prix Lisbon 2012 Champion Ivan Floch.




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Helder Coelho   Sveinung Bjørnerud, 2-0        
8 Sveinung Bjørnerud   Ivan Floch, 2-0
       
4 Lasse Nørgaard   Ivan Floch, 2-0   Ivan Floch, 2-1
5 Ivan Floch    
       
2 Elias Watsfeldt   Elias Watsfeldt, 2-1
7 David Calås   Elias Watsfeldt, 2-1
       
3 Pedro Carvalho   Johan Verhulst, 2-1
6 Johan Verhulst    


  Streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Lisbon provided Matej Zatklaj, Simon Görtzen, Rich Hagon, and Steven Leeming at twitch.tv/magicprotour.







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INFORMATION
 1.  Ivan Floch $3,500
 2.  Elias Watsfeldt $2,300
 3.  Sveinung Bjørnerud $1,500
 4.  Johan Verhulst $1,500
 5.  David Calås $1,000
 6.  Pedro Carvalho $1,000
 7.  Lasse Nørgaard $1,000
 8.  Helder Coelho $1,000
Pairings Results Standings
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Blue Bracket
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  • Top 8 – Player Profiles
    by Event Coverage Staff


  • Johan Verhulst

    Age: 32
    Hometown: Antwerp, Belgium
    Occupation: Consultant


    Guild:
    Orzhov

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Top 16 at Grand Prix Brussels and Grand Prix Turin.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Mizzium Mortars, BRg, 8-1.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Common Bond, WG.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Grove of the Guardian, WG.




    Elias Watsfeldt

    Age: 19
    Hometown: Gothenburg, Sweden
    Occupation: Globetrotter (not Martin Jůza level though)


    Guild:
    Boros

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Gold level!

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Skymark Roc or Ethereal Armor. I was Azorius and went 8-1. Lost to Pack Rat!

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Skymark Roc or Knightly Valor. Went 3-0 with Azorius.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Knightly Valor. 2-1, again with Azorius.




    David Calås

    Age: 20
    Hometown: Kalmar, Sweden
    Occupation: Student


    Guild:
    Azorius

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Uhm … 6-3 at Grand Prix Malmö and a PTQ Top 8 earlier this year.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    WGb, Vitu-Ghazi Guildmage. 8-1, only lost to Elias :
    -(

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    My first draft deck was pretty bad, Skymark Roc was huge though. UW, 2-1.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Second draft went better. Played UWR with a bunch of multicolored spells to go with my Lobber Crews. Skymark Roc and Hypersonic Dragon were probably tied for best card. 3-0.




    Lasse Nørgaard

    Age: 27
    Hometown: Aahus, Denmark (Team Rocket)
    Occupation: None/grinder


    Guild:
    Gruul

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Two Grand Prix Top 8s (first and third place), member of Team Rocket.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Lobber Crew, Rakdos, 8-1.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Stab Wound, Rakdos, 3-0.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Rix Maadi Guildmage, Rakdos, 2-0-1.




    Sveinung Bjørnerud

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Dunno. Maybe Sauar, Telemark in Norway
    Occupation: Workling at a consultancy firm


    Guild:
    Dimir, but feeling rather Selesnyan at the moment

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Top 8 at Grand Prix Paris 2011, Worlds team runner-up 2011, Pro Players Club level six.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Angel of Serenity, Selesnya splashing blue, 8-1.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Trostani, Golgari splashing Trostani, 3-0.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Trostani, Selesnya, 2-1.




    Helder Coelho

    Age: 31
    Hometown: Lisbon, Portugal
    Occupation: Supervisor


    Guild:
    Azorius

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Top 8 Grand Prix Lisbon 1998, winner Grand Prix Lisbon 1999, several second days at Grand Prix, several Pro Tours.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    UW, Cyclonic Rift, 8-1.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    UR, Hypersonic Dragon.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    GW, Angel of Serenity.




    Ivan Floch

    Age: 27
    Hometown: Bratislava, Slovak Republic
    Occupation: Tourist


    Guild:
    Golgari

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    Team World Champion, Top 4 Team Grand Prix San Jose 2012.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Niv-Mizzet. I played UR mainly because of the dragon. 7-2.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    Korozda Guildmage. I played GB splashing for Auger Spree after sideboarding. 3-0.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    Korozda Guildmage. I played GBru with nine defenders and Mercurial Chemister as splash card. 3-0.




    Pedro Carvalho

    Age: 19
    Hometown: Lisbon, Portugal
    Occupation: Student


    Guild:
    Izzet

    Previous Magic accomplishments:
    None.

    What was the best card in your Sealed Deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    I played GWb, went 7-2, and my best card was Korozda Guildmage.

    What was the best card in your first draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?
    I played GBw, went 3-0, and my best card was Pack Rat.

    What was the best card in your second draft deck, what color combination did you play, and what was your record?

    I played GB, went 3-0, and my best card was Korozda Guildmage.




     

  • Top 8 – Draft Roundup
    by Tim Willoughby

  • For this final draft of Grand Prix Lisbon 2012, the format was again Return to Ravnica, but the pressure was a little higher. From within the feature match area, the eight players drafted the decks that would ultimately decide who would be the Grand Prix champion.

    In seat one, Johan Verhulst of Belgium. He was passing to Ivan Floch, a former team World Champion and Slovak National Champion. Floch passed to Elias Watsfeldt. Then Sveinu Bjornderud of Norway. Sveinu passed to Pedro Carvalho, who passed to Lasse Norgaard, then David Calas and finally Helder Coelho.

    Of all those in the top eight, Helder Coelho of Portugal is most familiar with the spot he finds himself in now. Of the four instances of a Grand Prix, Coelho has been in the top eight of all but one of them, and a winner once. However, these were in constructed, and draft is quite a different challenge.

    Coelho opened Carnival Hellsteed as his first pick, and was solid in Rakdos for much of the draft. Little did he know that both Norgaard and Watsfeldt had the same idea. When I asked him about his deck at the end of the draft, he seemed unexcited. Its curve was not as quick as many Rakdos decks one might expect to see, but with the high end power of Spawn of Rix Maadi and Carnival Hellsteed, it certainly has the potential to put games away.

    Coelho wasn't directly next to anyone in the same colours, meaning that he had a fair shot at getting a solid deck together. The same couldn't be said of Johan Verhulst. With Azorius, he was in a bit of a fight with Ivan Floch to his left. The Belgian was in the dominant seat feeding Floch, and was able to stay pure Azorius, while Floch had to move in to Izzet to bring his deck together, using cards from both guilds.

    Watsfeldt, in Rakdos, had a little space to make his plan work, and seemed well versed in what he was doing with the archetype. His plan looked to be at the more aggressive end of the spectrum, with a 2nd pick Daggredrome Imp over Explosive Impact signalling that he intended to be one of the faster (and in some senses scarier) versions of the archetype.


    To Watsfeldt's left, Sveinu Bjornerud had quite a lot going on with what was in essence a base Selesnya deck. Looking to broaden out his playables in response to the fact that in at least pack two he was being cut pretty hard, Bjornerud found himself playing cards from Golgari as well as red, making the most of green's mana fixing. Guildgates and Gatecreeper Vine will be pivotal to victories seen for him in the top eight.

    For Pedro Carvalho, the plan was fairly straightforward. A first pick Collective Blessing set him down a path, and he followed it as best he could. Being next to Bjornerud likely hurt both players decks to some extent, and while he described his build as unspectacular, it had some power. Carvalho had three copies of Grisly Salvage in his sideboard, suggesting that had it not been for Bjornerud, he might have welcomed the chance to try Golgari in the mix.

    Lasse Norgaard did not seem to want to fight over Selesnya, and was content to be in Rakdos. While all the Rakdos players were spread out at the table, it seemed that supporting all three would be challenging. Of the three Rakdos decks at the table, his seemed the weakest, though he did have some Stab Wounds to potentially apply pressure.

    David Calas found himself between two Rakdos drafters, and rounded out the draft table with a deck sporting all three other colours. Having started with a Sphinx of the Chimes, soon Calas added a Vitu-Ghazi Guildmage to the mix, and never looked back. While his mana may be a little on the shaky side, he has a number of bombs to cast, meaning that if he can get past the Rakdos assault in the early game, his deck may be a powerful force in this top eight.

    The notable overview of this draft is that Golgari was virtually a non-factor in this top eight, and Izzet only adopted by a single player too. Soon enough we shall see if those who found themselves in crowed guilds are able to claw their way back out.




     

  • Quarterfinals – Roundup
    by Tim Willoughby

  • Helder Coelho (Rakdos) vs. Sveinung Bjørnerud (Selesnya splashing Rakdos)

    Helder Coelho (left) squaring off against Sveinung Bjørnerud (right)

    In game one, Bjørnerud led with Gatecreeper Vine and Axebane Guardian, while Coelho went off to a somewhat rocky but definitely slow start. His Rakdos deck never managed to mount much of an offense. Meanwhile, Bjørnerud's offense was limited to two Eyes in the Skies (= four Birds), but he had sufficient removal to fly to victory.

    A mulligan in game two didn't leave Coelho in any better of a position, and the fact showed that this Top 8 draft may have had one Rakdos drafter too many. Unfortunately, Coelho ended up with the arguably clunkiest of the three Rakdos decks, and also met a deck in this quarterfinal against which he would have needed to be fast.

    Sveinung Bjørnerud 2-0 Helder Coelho

    Lasse Nørgaard (Rakdos) vs. Ivan Floch (Azorius splashing red)

    Lasse Nørgaard (left) facing Ivan Floch (right)

    Floch had to manage without red mana for most of game one, and still he overpowered Nørgaard's Rakdos forces. The game went back and forth for a bit but careful timing and foresighted planning (not to mention fliers and detain creatures) got him the win in the end.

    Of course, with the forces of Azorius and Izzet combined, Nørgaard had much less of chance. It wasn't looking good for Rakdos ...

    Ivan Floch 2-0 Lasse Nørgaard

    Elias Watsfeldt (Rakdos) vs. David Calås (Green-White-Blue)

    David Calås (left) and Elias Watsfeldt (right)

    Game one, Watsfeldt's creatures simply overran Calås, who was stuck on Plains as his only lands.

    In game two, it was Watsfeldt's turn to mulligan, and he was rewarded with the amazing opening of Slitherhead, Thrill-Kill Assassin, Dead Reveler (both unleashed), and Daggerdrome Imp. With the finish line already in sight, however, he ran out of gas, just when a couple of potent roadblocks (Doorkeeper with Knightly Valor and Azor's Elocutors) showed up on Calås's side.

    An anticlimactic game three had Calås once again stumble over mana problems. To be fair though, his was the only real three-colored deck in the Top 8.

    Elias Watsfeldt 2-1 David Calås

    Johan Verhulst (Azorius) vs. Pedro Carvalho (Selesnya)

    Johan Verhulst (left) and Pedro Carvalho (right)

    In game one, Verhulst's fliers put early pressure on his opponent, and against a draw light on creatures, Martial Law sealed the deal.

    For game two, Verhulst raced with Lyev Skyknight and Soulsworn Spirit, and an overloaded Cyclonic Rift looked like it might put this one in the books. But Carvalho clawed his way back into the game and won on the back of Colölective Blessing.

    Carvalho's start of Centaur's Herald, Drudge Beetle, token, and Azorius Arrester did look impressive. However, Verhulst's Hussar Patrol, Voidwielder, and Azor's Elocutors provided the perfect foil. Over time, an incredibly complex board state developed (or put simply: a complete deadlock), and in the end, the game was actually won by Azor's Elocutors upkeep ability.

    Johan Verhulst 2-1 Pedro Carvalho




     

  • Semifinals – Johan Verhulst vs. Elias Watsfeldt
    by Tim Willoughby

  • After the most widely spectated type of PTQ final around (the quarterfinals of a Grand Prix) there was just one goal left – to win the whole shooting match. Elias Watsfeldt, may be the youngest member of the top four players, but he already has quite a bit of experience at the highest level, and was keen to kick things off against Johan Verhulst of Belgium, and start attacking with his aggressive Rakdos deck.

    Tavern Swindler from Watsfeldt matched off badly against Frostburn Weird from Verhulst, who had blue and white mana to work with. An unleashed Dead Revelers would fare little better at getting past four toughness, and when Watsfeldt added a Sunspire Griffin, it seemed he had exactly the blockers he needed.

    Johan Verhulst

    Watsfeldt had other ideas. A Pursuit of Flight made Dead Revelers a 5/6, able to attack in with impunity. Verhulst again had an answer though, in Paralyzing Grasp. Watsfeldt's attacks were being frustrated at every turn, and he played an unleashed Splatter Thug only to see it detained by Soulsworn Spirit.

    It was time for the Rakdos deck to go big, lest it be force to go home. A Golgari Longlegs was the biggest creature on the board, and Watsfeldt seemed pleased to finally have a creature that might get through for appreciable damage. It soon had Verhulst down to 10 life, while Watsfeldt himself was still up at 16. Another swing took Verhulst to five. As Jamie Wakefield once said 'It's the last fatty that kills you'. In this particular game, Golgari Longlegs was both the alpha and omega, finishing things off in brisk fashion.

    Elias Watsfeldt 1 – 0 Johan Verhulst

    For the second game, Watsfeldt was quick to take a mulligan, but equally quick to get damage in once he had done so. An unleashed Gore-House Chainwalker was unphased by a Sunspire Griffin, as with Pursuit of Flight it was a 5/4 attacker on the third turn.

    A Hussar Patrol came down the following turn to attempt the double block, but Watsfeldt was able to make this into a trade with an overloaded Electrickery. Azor's Elocuters came down for Verhulst as the only creature on the board, and they stayed that way as Watsfeldt was a little short on lands. When he finally did get the lands to cast Bloodfray Giant, it was met by Fall of the Gavel. This game seemed far more in the favour of the Belgian, whose Elocutors soon won the game in their own inimitable, way.

    Elias Watsfeldt 1 – 1 Johan Verhulst

    For the rubber game, against Watsfeldt would be playing with less than seven cards in his starting hand. His six was good though, and he started with a Swamp. Neither player had a spell for the first few turns, though each made their lands drops to have all their colours.

    Watsfeldt played a turn three unleashed Dead Reveler, while Verhulst had a Lyev Skyknight to detain it. Unleashed Splatter Thug came next from Watsfeldt, whose six seemed to have a good amount of game.

    Verhulst pondered a little before selecting Martial Law as his next play. It would not immediately deal with either of Watsfeldt's threats, but in the long run it would prove a versatile answer to whatever the biggest threat was on each turn, and would be impossible for the red/black deck to remove. In the short term though, Watsfeldt came in for attacks where he could. Verhulst was at 14 before he could detain anything with the enchantment, and had to settle for trading blows with Lyev Skyknight against Splatter Thug for a few turns.

    Sunspire Griffin and Frostburn Weird came from Verhulst, getting ahead on the board for the first time in the game. Now Watsfeldt stopped to consider his options. He attacked with Splatter Thug, into Frostburn Weird. An overloaded Electrickery took down both the 1/4 and Lyev Skyknight. Dreadbore killed Sunspire Griffin. So much for the Azorius board.

    Verhulst did not seem dismayed though. As his friend Mark Dictus watched on from the bleachers, he cast a Dryad Militant and a Fencing Ace, hoping that these would be enough for him to rebuild with.

    Watsfeldt was now looking to force the issue though. A Tenement Crasher joined his team, and both it and Splatter Thug came in. A double block on the thug, plus Downsize, was enough to take out the 3/3, but Verhulst still went to 6 on the swing.

    Elias Watsfeldt

    As Verhulst drew and passed without a play (other than selecting to detain Tenement Crasher with Marshall Law) Watsfeldt frowned. What tricks did the Azorius deck have in store for him? Watsfeldt traded his one creature for both of Verhulst's and it seemed that the Belgian had just the right follow up, with Azor's Elocutors on a functionally empty board.


    Watsfeldt seemed ready for this new 3/5 though. Now that Verhulst was tapped low enough not to be able to counter, he had both Treacherous Instinct, and Pursuit of Flight, in order to get in all the remaining damage he needed through.

    Elias Watsfeldt defeats Johan Verhulst 2-1, advancing to the Grand Prix Lisbon finals!




     

  • Top 8 Decklists
    by Event Coverage Staff











  •  

  • Finals – Ivan Floch vs. Elias Watsfeldt
    by Tobi Henke

  • Elias Watsfeldt ran the tables whole weekend long, going from Azorius in Sealed to Azorius in the first draft to Azorius in the second draft. Then he surprised everyone when he went Rakdos in the Top 8. Ivan Floch had drafted Golgari all day, so obviously he was blue-white-red now.

    Game 1

    Watsfeldt started on Slitherhead and Gore-House Chainwalker, then had the perfect answer for Floch's Frostburn Weird in Dreadbore as well as a Bellows Lizard, all on turn three. All Floch had for turn three was a measly Azorius Keyrune. He took another hit of 5 damage and Watsfeldt unleashed Dead Reveler for yet more pressure. Floch looked genuinely impressed.

    Elias Watsfeldt

    "Supreme Verdict?" Watsfeldt joked. But lo! Just as he said it, Floch did indeed rip Supreme Verdict from the top of his deck.

    Watsfeldt never recovered from this blow. The game ended a couple of turns later with Lyev Skyknight, Precinct Captain enchanted with Knightly Valor, Vassal Soul, and various tokens on Floch's side to Watsfeldt's lonely Thrill-Kill Assassin.

    Ivan Floch 1-0 Elias Watsfeldt

    Game 2

    Watsfeldt openend on Tavern Swindler, Dead Reveler, and Bloodfray Giant, Floch had Lyev Skyknight and Azorius Justiciar. All of this detaining allowed him to actually race, and Knightly Valor on Azorius Justiciar brought Watsfeldt down to 10 already.

    With most of his creatures unable to block in any case, Watsfeldt needed to regain the initiative. He put Deviant Glee on Dead Reveler, then attacked with the 5/4 Bloodfray Giant and 5/5 Dead Reveler. While the Giant got Floch down to 9, the Reveler was double-blocked, dying along with Floch's 4/4 Azorius Justriciar, and was then replaced with another unleashed Dead Reveler.

    Lyev Skyknight got Watsfeldt down to 7, and Azorius Keyrune plus Tower Drake threatened lethal damage on the very next turn. Before any of that could happen, however, Watsfeldt attacked with all of his creatures and shot Floch dead with Explosive Impact.

    Ivan Floch 1-1 Elias Watsfeldt

    Game 3

    For the first time in the match, Floch had the first play, Keening Apparition, and also drew first blood when Watsfeldt failed to drop a creature on turn two. He did have Dead Reveler for turn three, but this time it was very firmly kept on the leash, as Floch had just summoned Precinct Captain.

    Floch cast Azorius Keyrune and passed the turn. Watsfeldt thought long and hard, cast a second Dead Reveler, leashed as well, and passed too. He was forced to play the long game here, something his deck wasn't well equipped for, whereas Floch's deck, it seemed, was particularly aiming for that.

    Similar thoughts must have crossed Watsfeldt's mind, because finally some action came about when he put Deviant Glee on one of his Revelers and attacked. Floch's freshly-summoned Keening Apparition simply blocked and killed the enchantment, though. Watsfeldt made Cobblebrute, but on his turn, Floch had Voidwielder for Watsfeldt's untapped Reveler, allowing him to get in with Precinct Capatin and Runewing—for 4 damage and a free 1/1 Soldier.

    Ivan Floch

    Watsfeldt retaliated with Stab Wound on Voidwielder and also made a Daggerdrome Imp. But the Voidwielder was returned via Dramatic Rescue and Floch's fliers (Azorius Keyrune, meanwhile joined by Runewing) were too large for the Imp. All changed, however, when the Keyrune died to Launch Party and the sacrificed Slitherhead pushed Daggerdrome Imp to 2/2, forcing a trade with Watsfeldt's brand-new Tower Drake.

    Next, Lyev Skyknight met Explosive Impact, but Floch still had more. Knightly Valor on Runewing was finally too much for Watsfeldt.

    Ivan Floch 2-1 Elias Watsfeldt

    Congratulations to Ivan Floch, champion of Grand Prix Lisbon 2012!




     

  • Top 5 Cards of Grand Prix Lisbon 2012
    by Tim Willoughby and Tobi Henke



  • 5. Drudge Beetle

    Drudge Beetle is not the most flashy card out there, and in fact, it's more of a placeholder for a group of cards characterized by their two-mana casting cost, power 2, and toughness 2. One could have just as easily picked Keening Apparition for example. Even in a format full of crazy multicolor brews such as Return to Ravnica Sealed Deck the proverbial "Bear" (of Grizzly Bears fame) played an important role. Here, almost all succesful decks at least have the ability to start impacting the board on turn two.







    4. Electrickery

    For a low, low price, this little instant has caused more than its fair share of blowouts over the course of Grand Prix Lisbon. Whether it is answering a turn two Pack Rat, combining neatly with the first strike of a Splatter Thug, or decimating a collection of carefully set up blocks, Electrickery has shown itself to be a trick that is well worth considering in a format where one difference in toughness is enough to produce a road-block, and instant speed removal is comparatively scarce.







    3. Axebane Guardian

    A cornerstone of both sealed deck and its own special draft archetype, Axebane Guardian opens up a whole world of splash opportunities, as well as accelerating players to levels of mana where board dominating guildmages can do just about everything their little hearts could desire. We saw Ivan Floch using a collection of Axebane Guardians and Gatecreeper Vines to support Mercurial Chemister in his base Golgari deck, and even as far as the top eight, this was one of the draft archetypes that seems to be gaining momentum from players looking to have it all when it comes to big splashy effects.





    2. Daggerdrome Imp

    As a 1/1 flyer for two with lifelink, it is surprising what a big impact this little imp can have. Be it through creature enchantments, pump spells or simply the scavenge mechanic, it is easy for Daggerdrome Imp to become a virtual Baneslayer Angel, making racing next to impossible, and allowing decks like the Golgari deck to buy the time they need to grind their powerful late game inevitability.









    1. Supreme Verdict

    While in constructed the uncounterability of Supreme Verdict is part of what makes it a format defining card, Ivan Floch demonstrated throughout the top eight that if killing all of your opponent's creatures is good in constructed, it's even better in limited. From start to finish, it allowed him to craft game plans where his opponents would expend a lot of resources, only for the Azorius guild to pass judgement and set them back to square one. Pivotal in Floch's success in this top eight it turned an already good deck into a great one to allow him to take the title of Grand Prix Lisbon champion.






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