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Owen Smashes First-ever Super Sunday Series!

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The letter T!he first ever Super Sunday Series Championship is in the books, and inveterate face-smasher No. 12 Owen Turtenwald is your champion. We watched Owen battle through Born of the Gods-Theros-Theros draft, six rounds of Born of the Gods Standard, and a Modern Masters Top 8, topping it all off by beating No. 13 Makihito Mihara in the finals in spectacular fashion. Owen raised his plaque high here at the Wizards of the Coast headquarters—the Magic mecca—and he ticked another notch into his well-worn belt.

We saw some amazing things this weekend. The entrance of Born of the Gods certainly shakes up the Standard format considerably. There was nary a Mono-Blue Devotion deck in sight! The draft format has some new wrinkles added (as some of the pros have been saying, it makes red a truly playable color outside of the White-Red 15-land Aggro deck). We were also reminded that Modern Masters is awesome.

This may have been the first time for this awesome event—with all travel, hotel, food, and Wizards of the Coast–tour provided by the tournament organizers—but it is likely far from the last. In fact, an exit poll of the combatants showed that a full third of the players here would rather qualify for this again next year than a Pro Tour!

So if you scrub out on the first day of a Grand Prix, don't fret—qualifiers for the 2015 Super Sunday Series Championship are already being held at a Grand Prix near you. So suit up, and take down.

Good night from a snowy Renton, Washington!




Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals Champion
6 Manuel Mayer (12) Owen Turtenwald,
2-1
5 (12) Owen Turtenwald (12) Owen Turtenwald,
2-0
2 Chi Hoi Yim Andrew Robdrup, 2-1 (12) Owen Turtenwald,
2-1
1 Andrew Robdrup, 2-1
7 Javier Luna (13) Makihito Mihara, 2-0
8 (13) Makihito Mihara (13) Makihito Mihara, 2-0
3 Tan Gao Klaas Gruber, 2-0
4 Klaas Gruber









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  Streaming video coverage of the Super Sunday Series provided by Marshall Sutcliffe, Pro Tour Hall of Famer Randy Buehler, Rashad Miller, and Garth Avery. For a complete playlist of all the matches, visit ggslive's YouTube page.


EVENT COVERAGE INFORMATION
 1.  Owen Turtenwald $6,000
 2.  Makihito Mihara $3,000
 3.  Andrew Robdrup $1,500
 4.  Klaas Gruber $1,500
 5.  Chi Hoi Yim $1,000
 6.  Tan Gao $1,000
 7.  Manuel Mayer $1,000
 8.  Javier Luna $1,000
Pairings Results Standings
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  • Top 8 Profiles

    by Marc Calderaro


  • Top 8 Players!


    Andrew Robdrup

    Age:
    Hometown/Occupation: Kingston, Ontario Canada – I'm a grinder


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Detroit

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    World Magic Cup 2013

    Super Sunday Series record:
    7-1-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    3-0 Red-White Heroic

    Constructed archetype and record:
    4-1-1 Black-White Control




    Owen Turtenwald

    Hometown/Occupation: Milwaukee/Magician


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Atlantic City

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    Back-to-back Grand Prix wins

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-2-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    2-1 Jund

    Constructed archetype and record:
    4-1-1 Excalibur




    Javier Luna

    Hometown/Occupation: Buenos Aires, Argentina/Lawyer


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Santiago

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    Played some Pro Tours, Worlds and Nationals Teams

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-3

    Draft archetype and record:
    Blue-Red Tempo, 2-1

    Constructed archetype and record:
    White-Black Midrange, 4-2




    Manuel Mayer

    Hometown/Occupation: Tübingen, Germany/Blood Baron


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Prague

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    Two Grand Prix Top 8; losing Super Sunday Series finals at Grand Prix Rimini only to win one month later.

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-2-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    Orzhov Midrange, 2-1

    Constructed archetype and record:
    Orzhov Midrange, obv., 4-1-1




    Gao Tan

    Hometown/Occupation: Dalian, China/Half-professional Tourist


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Hong Kong

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    Nationals 2011 Top 8

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-2-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    White-Black Midrange, 3-0

    Constructed archetype and record:
    Bant Control, 4-2-1 (with one concession)




    Chi Hoi Yim

    Hometown/Occupation: Alabama, USA/Grinder


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Indianapolis

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    Pro Tour Dragon's Maze Top 25

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-2-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    Blue-Black, 2-1

    Constructed archetype and record:
    Azorius Control, 4-1-1




    Klaas Grüber

    Hometown/Occupation: Bremen, Germany/Student


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Gothenburg

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    This.

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-2-1

    Draft archetype and record:
    Blue-Green Fatties, 2-1

    Constructed archetype and record:
    Mono-Black Aggro, 4-1-1




    Makihito Mihara

    Hometown/Occupation: Chiba-Ken, Japan/SE


    Where did you qualify:
    Grand Prix Beijing

    Biggest Magic Accomplishment:
    World Champion 2006

    Super Sunday Series record:
    6-3

    Draft archetype and record:
    Blue-Black+Elspeth, 2-1

    Constructed archetype and record:
    Esper Gods, made by cardshophamaya.com, 4-2




     

  • More Decks By Popular Demand

    by Marc Calderaro

  • There were many interesting, innovative, and perhaps prescient decks that showed up today, but their pilots weren't able to get into the Top 8.

    Here's a look at just a few of the neat decks that showed up this weekend:

    Jesse Thompson – Golgari Midrange
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Standard



    Yoshikazu Okada Dimir Control
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Standard


    Daniel Wielgorski Junk Reanimator
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Standard


    Chong Kin Leong Orzhov Aggro
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Standard


    Ipank Aziz Riphat – Gruul Monsters
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Standard




     

  • Standard Decklists Played by Top 8 Competitors

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Here are the Standard decks played by the Top 8 competitors in the six rounds of Standard during Swiss play.

    Javier Luna – Orzhov Control
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist


    Andrew Robdrup – Orzhov Control
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist




    Chi Hoi Yim – Azorius Control
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist


    Tan Gao – Azorius Control with Kiora
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist


    Klaas Grüber – Mono-Black Aggro
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist

    Main Deck

    60 cards

    Mutavault
    20  Swamp

    24 lands

    Herald of Torment
    Lifebane Zombie
    Mogis's Marauder
    Pack Rat
    Pain Seer
    Rakdos Cackler
    Tormented Hero

    24 creatures

    Bile Blight
    Hero's Downfall
    Thoughtseize
    Ultimate Price

    12 other spells

    Sideboard
    Bile Blight
    Dark Betrayal
    Devour Flesh
    Duress
    Erebos, God of the Dead
    Lifebane Zombie

    15 sideboard cards



    Owen Turtenwald (12) – Mono-Black Devotion
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist


    Manuel Meyer – Orzhov Control
    Super Sunday Series Standard Decklist





     

  • Top 8 Modern Masters Draft Decklists

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Javier Luna Blue-White Faeries
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Makihito Mihara Gwr Saprolings
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Manuel Mayer 4 color goodstuff
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Owen Turtenwald Blue-Black Faeries/Control
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Chi Hoi Yim 5-color Good Stuff
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Tan Gao GWb Rebels
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Klaas Gruber White-Red Giants
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft


    Andrew Robdrup Sunburst Artifacts
    Super Series Sunday Championship 2014 - Modern Masters Draft




     

  • Quarterfinals Round-Up

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Manuel Mayer vs. (12) Owen Turtenwald

    No. 12 Owen Turtenwald was sporting a solid blue and black tempo deck that packed a big, can-be-tempo surprise—Death Cloud. He was going up against Manuel Mayer's strong White-Green deck with some Meloku, the Clouded Mirror.

    Both Games 2 and 3 were broadcast on the Magic Twitch channel. Make sure to check it out to see these two battle it out in video form. I will admit, of the four matches, these drag-out, knock-down games are best seen in video.

    Mayer's deck was just fast enough to stop the quick, tempo-based threats of Turtenwald's deck—but not over-the-top enough to finish out the game in short order. There were many calculated attacks and blocks and lots of thinking that went on during the three-set match.

    The first game was elementary enough for Mayer. He started with turn-one and turn-two suspended Durkwood Baloth and when they resolved, Turtenwald just couldn't get out from under the ten power of creatures. But the second and third were tough.


    The third match-up was amazing. The big turn came after Turtenwald discarded his first Take Possession. Mayer said this was what made him overextended his Meloku, the Clouded Mirror. "I thought, 'He can't possibly have two Take Possession.'"

    Then Turtenwald held out his second Take Possession for the Meloku, the Clouded Mirror, whenever it was to come. Turtenwald knew there was little chance for him to beat that if it resolved on a stalled board state. The split second card completely changed the game when it came down, and the tenor of the match was never the same.

    "And I sided out my maindeck Krosan Grip!" Mayer lamented.

    Mayer was running on empty. He had no cards left in his hand, and he was hiding his left arm under the table, because it was slightly shaking. The twelfth-ranked player in the world was showing his characteristic prowess. Turtenwald took the match.

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 2 – 1 Manuel Mayer



    Chi Hoi Yim vs. Andrew Robdrup

    I would call Alabama native, Chi Hoi Yim's deck "Five(?)-ish, maybe?" It's got power for sure—some big giants, a Sword of Light and Shadow—but it certainly didn't look like a tuned masterpiece. While Canadian was playing an Affinity-Sunburst contraption starring Oona, Queen of the Fae. When I asked him about the deck, he said, "I just tried to draft what Alex Hayne told me to force. It looks weird; we'll see how it works."

    The first game was a long, drawn-out slug fest. Robdrup started strong with a Bonesplitter, Errant Ephemeron, Myr Enforcer and Etherium Sculptor. Once it looked like he was ahead, Yim was able to scrap back with the Sword of Light and Shadow—gaining just enough life to keep himself in it.

    Then, the tables shifted when Yim was able to muster and Thundercloud Giant for more than enough to wipe the smile off Robdrup's face. He had previously joked, "No more creatures?" In the hopes that his previously creature-starved opponent would quit drawing late-game gas, but it was in vein. Robdrup tried to muster a comeback, but he lost the first one.


    In the second game, Robdrup again got off to a pretty fast start, and Yim just watched as Arcbound Stinger, Sanctum Gargoyle and Errant Ephemeron came in and beat face. Yim, still on the back foot, threw out Thundering Giant, Durkwood Baloth, Electrolyze, and Rift Bolt to stabilize the best he could. He sunk to two life very quickly, but held for a turn or two.

    Once Robdrup played a 3/3 Skyreach Manta and then another flier after that, Yim had to fold them up.

    The third game, Yim kept the big threats off the table the best he could. Executioner's Capsule took out the Myr Enforcer before it could get started. Though the Alabama player was still taking plinks from a Myr Retriever and an Arcbound Stinger, it wasn't the gigantic beatstick the 4/5 was. But it was the 5/5 Skyreach Manta that couldn't be answered.

    The Lightning Helix in his hand could answer many threats, but not the Fifth Dawn standout.

    After three good games, Andrew Robdrup advances to the semifinals over Chi Hoi Yim.

    Andrew Robdrup 2 – 1 Cho Hoi Yim



    Javier Luna vs. (13) Makihito Mihara

    Unlike many other players here, Argentine Javier Luna was pretty happy with his deck. A solid white and blue Faeries-based deck featuring Cloudgoat Ranger. Contrasted to that, most people were able to see the streamed mediocre draft deck Makihito Mihara was playing. There were four green drafters at the table, and Mihara mostly got the table scraps. But these games taught us, as we are often reminded—consistency is king.

    In the first game, Luna kept a hand that was missing one of his colors. Mihara cast some dorks, expecting them to be parried. Oddly enough, they never were. Luna never drew what he needed and went to the second game.

    And then sadly for Luna, as went the second. At least this time, Mihara dramatically smashed his Argentine opponent with a Rude Awakening for the win. A sweeping, grand gesture that was at least an appropriate ending to a match. Luna extended his hand and exited the Top 8.

    I told him many players would kill to be mana-screwed in the Top 8 against Makihito Mihara. Javier Luna smiled and agreed.

    (13) Makihito Mihara 2 – 0 Javier Luna



    Tan Gao vs. Klaas Grüber

    Klaas Grüber had aggression on his side. His deck was sporting three Brute Force. I'll repeat that: THREE BRUTE FORCE! It was a red and white Giant onslaught. He wasn't a big fan of it, giving he head shakes when I talked to him; but when he was turning his creatures sideways in the first game, it seemed quite fine to me.

    Granted, his opponent, Tan Gao, was not very happy with his deck either. He had a concoction that was trying to be Rebels, but ended up with some overly influential green cards. And in the first game, he was stuck on four lands. Grüber must have remembered there is a great value in drafting a deck that doesn't allow your opponents to stumble.

    The first game saw Grüber go Kithkin Greatheart into Stinkdrinker Daredevil, into Hillcomber Giant and War-Spike Changeling. He started suiciding his team in every turn after that, and when a Pardic Dragon came down and a Bound in Silence nabbed the only blocker for the Dragon, Giant Dustwasp, Gao had to pack it in for the second game.


    Then in the second game, the German player again went with the same turn one and turn two play. "Yeah, that's my deck," Grüber said in response to Gao's sigh. This game, much to the Chinese player's chagrin, was all too similar to the first. Grüber just mashed his palm onto the battlefield, turning all his dudes sideways, turn after turn after turn, and ripped his opponent to shreds.

    Klaas Grüber 2 – 0 Tan Gao




     

  • Semifinals Round-Up

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Both these match-ups were streamed with Randy Buehler and Marshall Sutcliffe announcing. If you head over to the archives, you can check out all the action in video format!


    Semifinalists

    Andrew Robdrup vs. (12) Owen Turtenwald

    In the first game, there was one huge turn. It was a stunner. When Owen Turtenwald cast a Logic Knot on Andrew Robdrup's turn-five Arcbound Wanderer, then cast a Death Cloud for two (removing Robdrup's hand) the turn before his Errant Ephemeron resolved, everything that had happened before was moot.

    That was a mouthful of a sentence, sure, but that's exactly how Robdrup must have felt when all that stuff happened. There was so much that occurred within, like, thirty seconds and it fundamentally shifted the game. Turtenwald had jumped on the see-saw of the game and launched Robdrup into the future.

    "I've never seen Death Cloud be such a big blowout before," Robdrup said as he shuffled for game two.


    Andrew Robdrup

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 1 – 0 Andrew Robdrup

    On about the fifth turn of the second game, with a Perilous Research on the stack, Turtenwald cast a Slaughter Pact with a Dreamspoiler Witches out. This wiped out both of Robdrup's creatures leaving him alone with his land and his thoughts. His Arcbound Stinger sadly put a counter on a Frogmite one second before the Slaughter Pact took that out as well.

    Owen might have been behind on life, but that was the only area of the game he was behind. With three more land than his opponent and a Death Cloud on deck, Owen was awaiting the moment to strip is opponent off all his land and his hand. Or he could just win by less dramatic means (although that's less fun for me, really),


    (12) Owen Turtenwald

    With Logic Knot and Vedalken Dismisser making sure that Robdrup was always behind, Owen was easily able to plinkity-plink away his Canadian opponent's life total with whatever dorky Faerie of his choosing. The Death Cloud was used merely as a Fireball to taken out the remaining life two life points.

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 2 – 0 Andrew Robdrup



    (13) Makihito Mihara vs. Klaas Grüber

    Klaas Grüber's opening in the first game was slower than either of his quarterfinals games. He started with a Stinkdrinker Daredevil into a Hillcomber Giant. Without the Kithkin Greatheart, his deck was much less explosive, and much less scary. When Makihito Mihara went Thallid into Pallid Mycoderm and basically blunted all the aggression from the German, the game grinded to a halt.

    It wasn't until Thundercloud Shaman and a Brute Force reared their heads was Grüber able to start knocking the Japanese player for some damage. But even then, we must all never underestimate the power of the Saproling tokens. Mihara somehow survived the first Giant wave (with thanks to Pallid Mycoderm) and when the second wave came in (via Thundering Giant), Mihara still had enough left over to chump block and preserve his life total at 12.

    And then he cast Sporoloth Ancient, for the first time leading the creature-power total on the board.


    (13) Makihito Mihara

    Mihara was more than happy to block and trade forever to whittle down Grüber's threats. And whittle down the threats he did. Mihara exhausted the questions from Grüber, then the Japanese player provided his own big ol' answers: a 5/5 Imperiosaur became answer enough.

    (13) Makihito Mihara 1 – 0 Klaas Grüber

    In the second game, a Suspended Pardic Dragon is something you don't often see, if ever. Grüber took a gamble suspending it on his second turn. And Mihara's turn-three Kodama's Reach pretty much told the German player, "Yeah, your Dragon is never, ever going to resolve."

    Every turn, Grüber was resigned to remove the second-to-last suspend counter from his Dragon, only to watch it go back up when the Japanese player got the turn back. It looked like Grüber had done that because it was his best chance at some offense. Because for the first five or six turns, moving that dice was about the only thing he did.

    He slumped again. Again he cast nothing.


    Klaas Grüber

    That Pardic Dragon served as an apt metaphor for Grüber this round. His deck was always threatening to be something big, but it just never materialized.

    Makihito Mihara easily took the second game.

    (13) Makihito Mihara 2 – 0 Klaas Grüber




     

  • Super Sunday Series Finals
    (13) Makihito Mihara vs. (12) Owen Turtenwald

    by Marc Calderaro

  • There are two giants in the finals—No. 12 Owen Turtenwald up against No. 13 Makihito Mihara. This matchup was something just about anyone could have predicted coming into this weekend. However, if you had followed the coverage yesterday, this finals was rather unexpected. Both players finished the first day at 4-2—having to mount an impressive run today to get here today.

    Further, even into the Top 8, Mihara's draft was far from the best deck he's drafted. Taking an Esperzoa then immediately abandoning his plan, he had to settle for a Red-Green Midrange deck that relies heavily on two Rude Awakening to finish out the game. Granted, that's exactly what he did in both of the previous match-ups, but still.


    (13) Makihito Mihara vs. (12) Owen Turtenwald

    Owen Turtenwald's deck was more overtly powerful. Seemingly one of the only blue or black drafters, Owen crafted a near-perfect tempo deck that topped out with a big, fat, Death Cloud. The card helped him win the game out of nowhere, and close out games that were threatening to drag on and on and on.

    The two sat down for the whole enchilada—$6,000 and the pride of being the first ever Super Sunday Series Champion ever!

    Game One

    Owen Turtenwald started by suspending an Errant Ephemeron, then lining its suspend counters with a Riftwing Cloudskate. Makihito Mihara ramped into Imperiosaur off the back of Search for Tomorrow. The Japanese pro (and likely front-runner for the Hall of Fame ballot coming soon) drew the first blood dealing five damage to Owen's face. Then, when he used Torrent of Stone to take out the Ephemeron, it looked like Mihara might have been in the lead.

    I mean, "might have been" in the sense that if you overlooked the fact that the dinosaur was bounced by Cloudskate, and the Marsh Flitter and Rathi Trapper were given free reign to get on in there from Owen. So really, Mihara "wasn't" in the lead.


    (12) Owen Turtenwald

    The game went like this for a couple of turns, losing a few life a turn, and Mihara was running out of ways to win the game. His stuff kept getting bounced and the blue and black little winged beasts were just nibbling him to death.

    Mihara cast a Rude Awakening and took Turtenwald down to three, but it looked like his master plan had ended there. Turtenwald's removal was just enough to halt Mihara from winning, even though it didn't look like he could win himself.

    But although Turtenwald never had anything bigger than a 2/2 on the field for over a turn, he was able to win the game convincingly at a very, very low life total by tempo-ing Mihara's deck out.

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 1 – 0 (13) Makihito Mihara



    Game Two

    Mihara could only laugh when the correct reveal to Owen's Thieving Sprite for one was a Rude Awakening. He desperately needed the early creatures to stop the quick beats of Owen's deck, even though it was the Rude Awakening that would likely actually close out the game. And Mihara could only cross his arms and slap his remaining two cards on the table, when on the next turn Owen cast a second Sprite—taking one of those early creatures he was so valuing.

    Owen only had two power of creatures against Mihara's eight, but Owen sure didn't seem like he was losing, even when he sunk to 10 life (against Owen's 18) on an attack from a Pallid Mycoderm, Riftsweeper, Thallid, and some tokens (with a Thallid Germinator waiting in the wings). Turtenwald kept threatening to swing the game in his favor, but like Mihara last game, he seemed to keep falling shy.


    (13) Makihito Mihara

    Turtenwald's life total kept slipping away—soon it was 6-17. But he was just on the cusp—that was when Mihara cast Sandsower with a litany of creatures on the battlefield. With more than enough extra creatures on the board, Mihara was able to push through the final few bits of damage he needed—and right when Owen had thought he was going to turn the game around.

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 1 – 1 (13) Makihito Mihara



    Game Three

    So it all comes down to this—Giant on Giant (granted, with no Giants in either players' deck).

    In the third game, Owen Turtenwald was the aggressor as usual—I mean, kinda. If you call a dead Marsh Flitter's tokens and a Stinkweed Imp "aggression," then yes, he was the aggressor. Mihara mustered a barely kicked Verdeloth the Ancient to combat this aggro force, but it just traded for the Stinkweed Imp. The 1/2 that has been stellar for Owen throughout this entire Top 8.

    After Mihara's follow-up Durkwood Baloth was countered, it seemed the two Goblin tokens were actually the best thing since sliced bread, stealing Mihara's life in little bits.

    As per usual with Mihara's deck it was using an entwined Rude Awakening to get back into it. He used it, along with a Path to Exile to wipe away the threats and take Owen to 7. He had two cards left in his hand, and one was the second Rude Awakening to close out the game. The writing was on the wall. We all knew it.

    Then, seemingly like clockwork himself, Owen cast a Death Cloud to nab the remaining two cards out of Mihara's hand, including the finishing Rude Awakening. The totals were 15-5 in Mihara's favor—but I can tell you from the floor, nothing else was.

    Mihara picked up Death Cloud from Turtenwald's graveyard, "Good card," he said.

    As Turtenwald had a Warren Pilferers remaining in his grip, it was only a few turns before he would take the game. The Japanese player perked back up when he topdecked a Citanul Woodreaders and drew into some more gas. His Torrent of Stone took out Owen's Warren Pilferers and then he cast an Imperiosaur.

    Owen had no answer. Was Mihara going to do it?! Anyone who played during original Mirrodin block can tell you the horror stories of the Death Cloud that seemingly closed up the game, only to have the opponent draw the exact sequence of cards necessary to worm his way out of it. Was this going to be how the finals of the Super Sunday Series was to end?

    Not if Owen had anything to say about it. Drawing like a champ, he tapped out and slammed a Take Possession onto the 5/5 dinosaur and Mihara let out a huge sigh. This was followed up with another tap out for an Errant Ephemeron. It was 11-9. Mihara had already snuck out a win in Game Two; could he do it again?

    Nope. No he could not.

    (12) Owen Turtenwald 2 – 1 (13) Makihito Mihara

    Owen Turtenwald is your Super Sunday Series Champion! Who knew? The man's pretty good at Magic. Congratulations, Owen!




     

  • Top 5 Cards

    by Marc Calderaro



  • 5. Rude Awakening

    One of the standouts from Fifth Dawn, this gigantic spell was the centerpiece of No. 13 Makihito Mihara's deck. Well, really it had two copies of this centerpiece, if that analogy works. Mihara drafted an unconventional deck, which the Twitch chat and Twitter replete with criticism, but Mihara proved the haters wrong by smashing face with this green land-based monster again and again in the Top 8 Modern Masters draft—tapping, then untapping, then retapping his land again and going from a seemingly unwinnable position to utter opponent decimation.





    4. Ephara, God of the Polis

    Spotlighting finalist Mihara again, his off-the-wall Standard deck (we're calling "Ephara & Friends"), featured the Born of the Gods multi-colored God as a consistent card-drawer of the highest order. Vaulting Mihara into the Top 8, this indestructible enchantment did everything it needed to do. And teamed with the new hotness, Brimaz, King of Oreskos (more on this later), you can even draw extra cards off your opponents' turns as well. Nice, nice, kids.





    3. Bile Blight

    If there was one card that shook up the format merely by existing it was Bile Blight. Though unlikely representative of the format to come, a grand total of zero Mono-Blue Devotion decks showed up here today because of this instant-speed, Echoing Decay–looking menace. Why play a deck that folds to the combination of this a Drown in Sorrow.

    In fact, this card has warped the format so much, player Andre Girard had metagamed the metagame by cutting back on copies he played because he expected that no Mono-Blue Devotion would show up. This card is really good for Black Devotion, Orzhov Midrange, and Top 8 finisher Klaas Grüber's Mono-Black Aggro deck alike.





    2. Brimaz, King of Oreskos

    What is there to be said about this card that hasn't already been said?: (Brimaz, King of White)

    There were 30 copies of this legend here today and there were in white decks of all stripes: Aggro, Midrange and full-on Control. As many, many people reiterated, this card gives people a "reason to play white again."

    Expect a lot more white in you LGS's future—and expect it at Pro Tour Born of the Gods coming real soon.





    1. Death Cloud

    It makes me so happy to have my favorite card from Darksteel as the number one card of this tournament. And there's no favoritism here—this card is rightfully number one. No. 12 Owen Turtenwald drafted an incredible blue and black tempo deck in the Modern Masters Top 8 draft portion of the tournament with this and a Take Possession as the marquee bombs.

    Death Cloud crushed his semi-final opponent, Andrew Robdrup and finalist Makihito Mihara by casting the card for just enough to strip the entire hand away and grinding out the win over the next couple turns.

    The most memorable moment from this first Super Sunday Series Championship will be the rubber game from the finals where Owen stripped the second Rude Awakening from Mihara's hand the turn before it was going to take his life away.

    Much like Pox and Balance before it, Death Cloud affects so many resources, it's almost guaranteed that it will do exactly what you need it to, and the other stuff it does is all bonus. Oh how I miss Death Cloud, my dear, dear friend.






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