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1999 Magic: The Gathering World Championships
Team Finals Recap

The US only needed to win two of the four games in order to be champion, thanks to the tiebreaker system.

On table one, US National Champion Kyle Rose faced German National Champion Marco Blume.
On table two, John Hunka's Forbidden Magpie deck went up against Rosario Maij's Covetous Dargon deck.
On table three, Zvi Mowshowitz's Bargain deck faced David Brucker's Living Death deck.
On table four, Charles Kornblith, playing the same deck as Mowshowitz, faced Patrick Mello, who was playing the same deck as Blume and Maij.

On paper, Marco Blume's Covetous Dragon deck should probably have beaten Kyle Rose's Stompy deck. However, on the Worlds Stage, in fron of the ESPN cameras, things worked out differently.

In game 1, Marco Blume cast a Covetous Dragon with no artifacts in play. Not only did the Dragon immediately go to the graveyard, but Blume took two damage while casting it in the first place, thanks to his Ancient Tomb. Kyle Rose reacted noticeably, a rarity for the normally taciturn US Champion. Blume lost on the next turn, and may well have been demoralized by his play error.

On the next table over, John Hunka's Forbidden Magpie deck managed to keep Rosario Maij in check during game 2, as Maij had to Mulligan, had his early artifacts countered, and had only one land in play as late as turn six. By that point, Hunka had out a Thieving Magpie and a Morphling. With Hunka filling his hand from the Magpie and administering severe tire damage with the Morphling, Maij had no choice but to concede, tying the match at one duel apiece.

Back at the Champions' table, Rose was up by two games at the start of game three. Blume had two Cursed Scrolls, a Grim Monolith, and a Covetous Dragon on the table by turn three. Having disposed of Rose's Pouncing Jaguar and River Boa, he played another Covetous Dragon. Rose tried an all-out attack, but couldn't quite afford an Overrun, and could only do 11 points of damage. Blume won the next turn with two Dragons and an active Scroll.

At this point, Maij had beaten Hunka, 3-1. Zvi Mowshowitz and Charles Kornblith were both leading their matches, two games to none.

In game four of the Rose-Blume matchup, Blume didn't have enough red mana to Wildfire after Rose targeted a Fire Diamond instead of a Cursed Scroll with his Uktabi Orangutan. This proved to be the difference in the game, as Blume had no way to stop the onslaught of creatures.

Rose 3 - Blume 1

On table three, Zvi Mowshowitz was starting his third game against Brucker. On Brucker's first turn, he played a Forest and a Birds of Paradise. On Mowshowitz's first turn, he played an Underground River, Mox Diamond (discarding a City of Brass), Grim Monolith, and a Voltaic Key. Brucker played a Spike Feeder, causing Mowshowitz to remark "The target is now 24."

On Mowshowitz's second turn, he untapped, played Vampiric Tutor during his Upkeep, got a Yawgmoth's Bargain, played it (casting it with mana, since he didn't have a Show and Tell handy), drew 19 cards, going down to 1 life, played Delusions of Mediocrity, drew a lot more cards, played more mana-producing artifacts, used Scroll Rack, played more Mox Diamonds, played Turnabout (to untap his artifacts, which by this time included four Grim Monoliths, three Voltaic Keys, four Mox Diamonds, and a Scroll Rack), got a lot of mana, played Turnabout again for even more mana, used Scroll Rack for four cards, explaining that he left the Blaze on top of his deck, and Blazed Brucker for 27 points of damage to win the game on turn two.

The United States wins the National Team Competition.

Mowshowitz 3 -Brucker 0

USA 2 - Germany 1



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